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Baseball is not a typical business

Posted on: December 19, 2008 9:11 pm
 

For years I've heard agents sound the horn of the "free market" or "capitalism" at is best when they describe the sky rocketing salaries of their clients.

Does anybody else have a problem with this line of bizarre thinking?

Your typical business is run for profit.  Although the world is starting to recognize the efforts of business' that regard the environment with respect but typically money talks. 

Baseball on the other hand always seems to stray off the beaten path of Capitalism or Free Market economics usually onto the path of Stupidity!  WHY I ASK?  The answer is simple.

The half wit (in baseball terms) billionaire owners of too many franchises view the sporting world as a forum to boost their own inflated egos.  If these same owners ran their REAL business the way they run their teams then they'd be lined up for a meal at the local soup kitchen.

The agents of the baseball world prey on these helpless egomaniacs.  One against the other - $10 million here another 20 mill their - it's sickening.  

The real losers are the fans who take it on the chin - get up - bring their kids to the game buy a hot dog and a pop - to watch Manny or Barry or Alex saunter down to first base on a ground ball to the pitcher.  The fans who now are worried about their jobs - worried about putting apresent or two under the tree for Christmas - worried that they might be lining up at the soup kitchen.

All the while Manny threatens to retire because no ones showing him the love he deserves - Furcal's agent is so slippery next week he's entering one of those county catch the pig contests - but he's the pig - Hank and Hal think America's pastime is watching the Yankee's spend money so their dishing out faster than Congress can bail out the next fat Wall Street Tycoon.

The next time someone says something stupid like baseball salaries are free market economics at work - point the finger at one of the idiot owners in the news that week - make sure it's the middle one! 

 

Comments

Since: Feb 8, 2007
Posted on: December 21, 2008 11:43 am
 

Baseball is not a typical business

BK,

"Not only is this rant unoriginal and cliche, it is also a blatant and frustrated whine of some small market fan from the middle of the country..."

First off, I'm a Dodger fan.  I've been a Dodger fan since the mid 70's.  Last time I checked they're not a small market team. 

"You bring up the Yankees and their seemingly economically careless shopping spree, but the last time I checked not a single Steinbrenner is going to be lining up at the soup kitchen any time soon...."

Point well taken but I must confess that my rant as you put it was reeking of sarcasm.....we all know that these powerful owners have way too many friends in high places to be lining up for food.......However, it might not stop them from holding their hands out for a couple billion to tie them over for a few months.  Not for their baseball operations of course, but for their REAL business.

Your argument about the small market teams is a legitimate one.  I agree that the luxury tax can pad the pockets of some owners that seem to care little about the product on the field.  I think the system lends itself to failure.  I strongly believe that a reasonable salary floor needs to be established.   That will never happen unless a salary cap is also established.  The chances of that happening in my life time are slim to none.

I also believe for too many owners baseball decisons are made based on anything but rational business principals.  The economics of the game can be turned upside down when 4 or 5 wealthy teams can bid on the cream of the crop while the others cannot afford to do the same.  Not only does it eliminate the opportunity for those other teams to fill their roster with those players but it inflates the salaries of the next tier of players.  Like it or not, the Yankees, Dodgers, Red Sox, Angels, et all need the other 20 + teams to survive.  Eliminate those smaller markets and the game suffers.  There are a hell of a lot of Yankee caps sold outside of N.Y. 

"There are many, many people in this country who need those necesities, and I would be much more concerned about them than about someone who can't afford a baseball ticket."

Your argument about the importance of the necessities in life is ridiculous.   On one hand you proudly pronounce the $4 billion dollar enterprise the Steinbrenner's run and on the other you're scolding me about the financial facts of life.  Should the average family give up the thought of going to a ball park a couple times a year?  Should they stop "whining" (as you graciously put it) about the rising cost of tickets and just take it in stride?  Baseball put a lot of smiles on my face when I was a kid.  I continue to love the pure game of baseball and will always enjoy the experience.  I'm lucky enough to be able to bring my family whenever the sun is shining to watch a game.  Not everyone is that lucky.   I might be crazy but I don't think it's too much to ask for 3 meals a day and 4 bleacher seats a couple times a year?

This is exactly what baseball needs more of - the world needs more of....The USA wasn't built upon the foundation of a Monarchy but it was and will continue to prosper on the backs of the middle class - the  AVERAGE JOE.  It's never a bad time to stick up for those that have kept quiet - you call them whiners or maybe it's just me that you're talking about - but the only whining that seems to hit the news is the whining from millionaires that work for billionaires or from billionaires that employ millionaires.




Since: Dec 22, 2006
Posted on: December 20, 2008 6:53 pm
 

Baseball is not a typical business

Not only is this rant unoriginal and cliche, it is also a blatant and frustrated whine of some small market fan from the middle of the country whose greedy owners consistently take money from the multi-million dollar luxury tax pot provided by the likes of the Yankees, Red Sox and Mets, and put it in their pockets instead of into bettering their teams.

While you are right in that some owners care more about winning than others, I can bet you that not a single one would pay an extra penny if it would prove detrimental to business.  You bring up the Yankees and their seemingly economically careless shopping spree, but the last time I checked not a single Steinbrenner is going to be lining up at the soup kitchen any time soon.  The Yankees and their TV network (YES) is a $4 billion entity whose equity only stands to increase in value if Sabathia, Burnett and whatever other free agent they choose to sign turn into championships.  It is not an egomaniacal power trip but a calculated business risk.

As to your poor Joe the Fan who shells out money to bring his kids to the stadium, it is a sad and unfortunate reality of economics that not everyone in society will have equal access to entertainment and various amenities.  But a baseball ticket is not a birthright.  It is not food and it is not water and it is not a roof over your head.  There are many, many people in this country who need those necesities, and I would be much more concerned about them than about someone who can't afford a baseball ticket.

So to recap, I understand that many fans in the middle of the country are frustrated, but instead of pointing the finger at the big market teams or greedy athletes and agents, how about looking at your own owners who care more about collecting luxury tax revenue every year and then crying poor, than about their teams' success. 



Since: Feb 8, 2007
Posted on: December 20, 2008 6:10 pm
 

Baseball is not a typical business

Hey Reubin,

Thanks for the lesson.   However you may want to double check your assessment.  I hope you're not teaching young impressionable children.  I understand that they're our future and to think that their teacher might be cutting their education short seems criminal. 

Of course I'm assuming that this criticism comes from an intelligent source instead of an insecure masochistic schmuck.   

Happy Holidays




Since: Feb 8, 2007
Posted on: December 20, 2008 5:49 pm
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator




Since: Oct 1, 2007
Posted on: December 20, 2008 5:36 pm
 

Baseball is not a typical business

Welcome to the internet Reubin



Since: Dec 20, 2008
Posted on: December 20, 2008 3:07 pm
 

Baseball is not a typical business

Owners may be half-wits and you make some good points, but it's hard to take you seriously when you don't know the difference between their and they're.



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