Blog Entry

Coaching changes on the horizon in Miami?

Posted on: December 22, 2010 10:57 am
 
Posted by Andy Benoit

There have been whispers about Tony Sparano’s job security in Miami. With all due respect…doesn’t that seem insane? This is the same Tony Sparano who took over a 1-15 club and immediately went 11-5 en route to a division title in 2008.

Yes, Sparano’s Dolphins are just 7-7. And thanks in part to a rash of injuries, they finished 7-9 a year ago. But, given the somewhat surprising inconsistency of quarterback Chad Henne, you could arguT. Sparano (US Presswire)e that the Dolphins have 7-7 type talent. They certainly don’t have the resources of the Patriots or Jets.

However, owner Stephen Ross has not publicly endorsed his head coach, leading many in South Florida to believe that Sparano could be headed out. Ross has put a great deal of focus on bringing star power to the organization – we’ve all seen the celebrity minority owners of the Dolphins walking down the orange carpet lined by paparazzi before primetime home games. Perhaps Ross thinks he can get a headline-grabbing head coach like Jon Gruden or, more likely, Bill Cowher.

Sparano isn’t the only name being whispered about in Miami. With the Dolphins ranking 22nd in total offense this season, many believe that offensive coordinator Dan Henning’s time has passed. Henning, a longtime Bill Parcells confidant, joined the Fins as part of the Big Tuna regime change three years ago (Sparano, of course, was part of that regime change, as well).

There will be no need to fire Henning, however; multiple sources have said the 68-year-old plans to retire after the season. (To Dolphins brass, this must be like finding out that the girlfriend you haven’t had the guts to dump is taking a new job two time zones away.)

This, according to Jeff Darlington of the Miami Herald, is why Sparano has had no problem saying things like, “I think that Dan Henning for Tony Sparano has been tremendous, and I think that the guy has done a wonderful job here in my time here. I look at the entire body of work.''

Keep in mind, it’s entirely possible that Sparano’s praise for Henning is genuine. Henning is the same guy who coordinated a Dolphins offense that, though short in playmakers, managed to finish 12th in total yards in 2008. Everyone lauded him for his making due with the innovative wildcat two years ago.

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Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 12, 2012 12:31 pm
 

Coaching changes on the horizon in Miami?

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Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 6, 2012 11:29 am
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Since: Sep 1, 2006
Posted on: December 23, 2010 1:17 pm
 

Coaching changes on the horizon in Miami?

Think about how good this team could be if tuna drafted Matt Ryan instead of Jake Long. As a Jets' fan, I am glad they passed on
the franchise QB, which is something you should never do when you need a QB.



Since: Jul 24, 2008
Posted on: December 22, 2010 3:14 pm
 

Coaching changes on the horizon in Miami?

There is SO much wrong with the Dolphins, it is impossible to be able to blame any one person. 

However, we do know it has been well over 10 years since Dan Marino retired, and in all that time Miami still has not been able to come up with a decent QB they can build around...much less find a deep receiver to throw it to. 

They sat on their hands or made wrong decisions when it came to free agents like Drew Brees, Kurt Warner, Michael Vick, etc.  It's even worse when it comes to drafting...with a trail of failed/wasted high picks like John Beck, Pat White, Chad Henne, and others. 

To make it even more puzzling Miami even has some advantages that most other teams don't.  Specifically, they play in nice weather, on one of the best natural surfaces, and there is NO STATE INCOME TAX. 
Meanwhile, every year Miami passes up guys like Aaron Rogers, Matt Schaub, and Joe Flacco in the early rounds.  Even Ryan Fitspatrick or Matt Cassell look pretty good and they were both SEVENTH round picks.

Why is it that Miami cannot find a QB or deep WR?  

Meanwhile, the stadium 'experience' has become more of a circus than a football game.  With an owner that puts more emphasis on having celebrity partners and concerts, it wouldn't surprise me to see clowns handing out balloon animals during timeouts.   

Are the Dolphins cursed?  Is there any hope this team will ever put a serious contending team on the field again? 



Since: Dec 17, 2009
Posted on: December 22, 2010 12:46 pm
 

Coaching changes on the horizon in Miami?

The Tuna apparently can't stand to keep a GM/VP job any longer than he used to keep a coaching job. He picked Chad Henne and obviously he is not the answer, so I guess he figured it was time to bail.... I hear he may end up with VP job with the Vikings next.

As for Sparano, he seems like a good coach, but will now need another couple years to groom a new QB. If he does get canned by Miami, maybe he follows along with Parcells and they can start the cycle over again...



Since: Aug 7, 2009
Posted on: December 22, 2010 12:32 pm
 

Sporano deserves a chance ...

1) Next year he'll actually really truly be the coach (rather than Parcell's mouthpiece). You have a to give a coach one year, eh?

2) Maybe he can finally prove that for once Parcell's hasn't danced away right before a team collapses ... like the Giants, Pats, Jets, and Cowboys have done (yes, I know we can argue the ink isn't dry on the Cowboys)
3) With a few more celebrity co-owners, the sky the stars the limit.

4) No one from the team made Dancin' with the Stars this year ... the team has nothing but upside.

5) Can you imagine combining HBO's Hard Knocks with the Sporanos Sopranos? You really don't want to be the draft pick that doesn't make the team.


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