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Blog Entry

NFLPA files decertification paperwork

Posted on: March 11, 2011 5:06 pm
Edited on: March 11, 2011 9:07 pm
 
Posted by Will Brinson

At 4:45 p.m., DeMaurice Smith announced to reporters the NFLPA had rejected the owners' most recent offer on a new CBA and the union was demanding 10 years of audited team financial statements by 5 p.m. Friday in order to agree to an extension of the CBA.

The league apparently didn't blink, and Smith and the union followed through with their plan to apply for decertification, having faxed the paperwork to Judge David Doty's office in Minnesota.

"The NFL Players Association it has informed the NFL, NFL clubs and other necessary parties that it has renounced its status as the exclusive collective bargaining representative of the players of the National Football League," the NFLPA said in a statement. "The NFLPA will move forward as a professional trade association with the interest of protecting the current and former professional football players."

The union also faxed a letter to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell , informing him of the decision. In addition, NFLPlayers.com and NFLPA.org were shut down, their home pages set to "404 Error" messages that featured a new URL -- www.nfllockout.com.

This is relatively interesting, as the NFL hasn't actually decided to lock out the players yet, though they purportedly need to make a decision before midnight to either impose the last set of rules or lock the players out, the former which might result in free agency beginning right away .

Either way, mediation, for now, has ended.

"The parties have not achieved an overall agreement, nor have they been able to resolve the strongly held competing positions that separated them on core issues," mediator George Cohen said. "No useful purpose would be served by requesting the parties to continue the mediation process at this time."

This means the NFLPA is no longer a union, but rather a trade association made up of many individuals. And it also means there's a strong likelihood the players will file an antitrust suit against the league. In fact, reports are beginning to leak out that the players have already filed suit against the NFL, and included some pretty big names as plaintiffs.

The NFL carried some pretty hefty public relation's spin in a lengthy statement of its own .

NFL Labor

No one is happy where we are now," NFL lead negotiator Jeff Pash said. "I think we know where the commitment was. It was a commitment to litigate all along."

A league statement added: "The union left a very good deal on the table."

It said the offer included splitting the difference in the dispute over how much money owners should be given off the top of the league's revenues. Under the expiring CBA, the owners immediately got about $1 billion before dividing the remainder with the players; the owners originally were asking to roughly double that by getting an additional $1 billion up front.

Also in the NFL's offer, according to the league:
  • Maintaining the 16 regular-season games and four preseason games for at least two years, with any changes negotiable. 
  • Instituting a rookie wage scale through which money saved would be paid to veterans and retired players.
  • Creating new year-round health and safety rules.  
  • Establishing a fund for retired players, with $82 million contributed by the owners over the next two years.  
  • Financial disclosure of audited league and club profitability information that is not even shared with the NFL clubs.
As you can see, the NFL didn't pull any punches when it came to laying its full proposal (or purported proposal, at least) on the table for the media and the fans. Purported is important, too, because shortly after Pash addressed the media and said many of the same thing, a players' lawyer called him a "liar." 

Pash also said, surprisingly, that there has been no decision made on whether the league will lock the players out yet or not.

That's interesting from the perspective that no lockout would dramatically change the landscape of what we expect to see come down the pipe, but it also seems unlikely that the owners wouldn't take that stance.

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Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 8, 2012 4:57 pm
 

NFLPA files decertification paperwork

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hgtrerte
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 3, 2011 9:13 am
This comment has been removed.

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Since: Oct 31, 2009
Posted on: March 15, 2011 2:15 pm
 

NFLPA files decertification paperwork

What gets me about this whole situation is that the billion dollars that the owner's get off the top was granted to them when profits were about 5 billion a year which equates to 20%. In the new deal they started out asking for another billion which would put them at 22% of the supposed profits of 9 billion. 2% increase unreasonable? I think not, but then they went down to 800 million which would put them right back at 20% and the Player's Union still balked at it and demanded records to prove the need. So truthfully that shows that the majority of the greed is on the side of the players. All the owner's did was say ok we get 20% off the top now so we want to keep that 20% to get to a new deal. Under the old CBA the split after the money off the top was 60/40 for the owner's which if it stayed the same would bump player's cuts of the profits from 2 billion to around 2.9 billion actually 2,880,000,000. That is almost another billion dollars to the players and the players union. How is this not enough? The players want 82 million put into a special acount for retired players healthcare. Why can't this 82 million come out of that extra 880 million they would get if the CBA has the same split with the owners getting there extra 800 million, it's not an unreasonable question 82 million is less than 10% of the added 880 million. I do think the owner's should pay for the healthcare, but I was really just trying to show how petty the player's union is being about this need for financial records. It is a joke and I hope that the players lose their whole season, and even though I doubt they will I hope they lose out in court as well.

On the note of the NFLPA demanding that future players miss the NFL draft to disrupt the league's tradition, I say this to the college athletes that are going into the draft: There is only one NFL, there is only one draft day, you will only get one chance to walk up on that stage after your name is called and shake hands with the owner/gm of the team that drafted you and hold that jersey up and put on that hat on ESPN in front of millions. Yes eventually you will be able to play in front of millions, if you are actually good enough and not a flop, but to miss a once in a life time experience because you were asked to by a union that no longer exists of former players who have participated in this same ritual would be sad. Are you willing to give up your moment to try and hurt a league that you want to employee you?



Since: Jun 25, 2009
Posted on: March 12, 2011 7:48 pm
 

NFLPA files decertification paperwork

I know there should be retirement benefits for players but within reason. If you make millions of dollars in your maybe short career you should be able to make it to death just okay. You may have sacrificed your health and body but you did it by choice and were compensated very well for it. I will be working until past midnight tonight and probably most nights until tax season is over. Can I demand that my company pay better retirement benefits if I get a bad back from 17 hour days.

If these players gave a crap about their union "brothers" and especially the retirees that made far less money back in the day they would do something about it.  And I'm not talking about demanding today's NFL owners take care of everybody's health benefits for life...... they can take care of things themselves.   This union of NFL players grossed well over 3 billion dollars last year as a group.... 3 BILLION DOLLARS....  if they were truly a union and if they truly cared about each other the solution is simple....  agree to put away 5 percent of every NFL players check for as long as they play football in the NFL... for last year alone that's 150 million dollars.... do the math.  If they do that for 7 years, they'll have over a billion dollars plus interest somewhere....... how many NFL players and their families does 150 million dollars per year take care of?   
But that's too easy.... the players will never go for that because they believe 100 percent of their money should remain their money and some of the owner's money should be their money as well...  not fair.   A player making 500 grand can afford 25 grand a year to go towards benefits for themselves and their union.  A player making a million dollars can more then afford 50 grand and a player making 10 million dollars per year should be able to survive on 9.5 million per season..... once again, it's not that hard... simple numbers.
Of course there would have to be some rules or players to qualify and how much they qualify for.  A player that plays one season for 500 grand and contributes 25 grand and then gets cut would probably be entitled to less then somebody that played 10 years.  But that's not for a sales guy like me to figure out... they've got unlimited resources and funds to figure out who to get that done if they wanted to get it done.
Then again we're talking about idiots that can't figure out how to split 9 billion dollars per year in revenue in the most successful league in the world..... so maybe I'm wrong.



Since: Sep 16, 2009
Posted on: March 11, 2011 11:12 pm
 

NFLPA files decertification paperwork

This will seem very utopianistic but I have a hard time stomaching any of this right now. Asking for an extra billion dollars when we have a country that is sinking beneath our feet.

Really, I know that is not a realistic thought but when I read other news and then turn to the war between millionaires and billionaires, I get a little dizzy.

In all honesty I have to side with the owners. The companies are theirs to do what they want with. Look at the Clippers in the NBA, they make a great profit ever year with bad teams because the owner chooses to run it like a business. "You want how much? How about you take your talents somewhere else." Then he brings in a young guy who doesn’t cost too much.

I know there should be retirement benefits for players but within reason. If you make millions of dollars in your maybe short career you should be able to make it to death just okay. You may have sacrificed your health and body but you did it by choice and were compensated very well for it. I will be working until past midnight tonight and probably most nights until tax season is over. Can I demand that my company pay better retirement benefits if I get a bad back from 17 hour days.

And the rookies need to have a cap. I understand that it will be bad if a very talented guy shreds his knee before the first contract is up and he never gets that big payday (relative, more $ then most of us will make in a lifetime). But guess what, that is life. Just the same as a smart kid going through college and getting a degree, doing everything they tell you you need to do. Then he graduates and sorry no jobs. Does he get compensated for all his "work" to get there?




Since: Nov 15, 2010
Posted on: March 11, 2011 11:02 pm
 

NFLPA files decertification paperwork

So you have been lucky to never work for a company who put on hiring freeze or asked for more work and same pay.

The owners do pay, but every time they had tried to keep salaries in check with low offers or no offers to free agents they were sued for collusion.  They were damned if they do or damned if they dont.  Plus, they were asking for 10 years of books, including cash and assests of family menbers.  Complete BS.  




Since: Dec 3, 2007
Posted on: March 11, 2011 10:33 pm
 

NFLPA files decertification paperwork

Actually employees tell bosses what they are going to do all the time. It is called collective bargaining and the major reason why GM, Ford and Chrysler nearly went out of business. This is not the 1960's, unions are worthless today. See NFLPA.



Since: Sep 1, 2006
Posted on: March 11, 2011 10:33 pm
 

NFLPA files decertification paperwork

A union for millionaires with a lawyer in charge ??????????? looks like not much will get done until someone can't afford to buy a new Ferrari, or go clubbin. it won't be the lawyer 



Since: Dec 30, 2008
Posted on: March 11, 2011 9:45 pm
 

NFLPA files decertification paperwork

Amen to that... they should be taking care of the fans with all that money!!!!!



Since: Jun 25, 2009
Posted on: March 11, 2011 9:43 pm
 

NFLPA files decertification paperwork

Most of the comments I see so far are siding with the owners. Most of the reasons are because the players are either overpaid or paid a lot to do what ever the owners want. Let’s get one thing straight, the players don’t get money if the owners don’t won’t to give it. So don’t blame the players for million dollar contracts and then don’t cry about losing money. Simply don’t pay players the millions if you’re gonna whine about it.

You are wrong because you don't understand how this works. The owners CAN'T and aren't allowed to get together and make a decision like that.  If as little as 2 owners get together over a coffee at a starbucks and decide to pay less, they'll be charged with collusion and losing millions more then they would have paid....   the only time the owners can legally get together and do this is right now.... when the CBA is up for renewal or expired... that's why the owners are holding their ground, it's the only chance they'll get to do so for the next 4 or 5 years.



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