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Blog Entry

Is it 3 1/2 years or is it six?

Posted on: April 21, 2011 4:28 pm
 
Posted by Josh Katzowitz

It’s been a given that, when talking about the average length of an NFL player’s career, about 3 ½ years is considered the correct number. Since the lockout began – and in the leadup to the lockout – the NFLPA has made sure to get those figures out there to convince the public that the owners’ desire for a new CBA is unfair (that’s an oversimplification, but you get my drift).

In a recent conference call with Chargers season ticket holders, commissioner Roger Goodell said those numbers weren’t accurate and, instead, claimed that the average was closer to six years for a player who “makes an opening day roster (as a rookie)” and closer to nine years for a first-round draft choice.

That’s quite a disparity, eh?

Steph Stradley, who writes a fan blog for the Houston Chronicle, did some exploring to figure out how there could be such a difference, and she got the NFLPA to provide her with the handy chart you can see below.

"The NFLPA ran a report on the average number of accrued seasons (6 games on a roster in a season) for NFL players as of the first game of the 2010 regular season, and the average is 3.54 accrued seasons. Here is the report:



Obviously, the two sides aren’t measuring the average using the same parameters. So, it’s still hard to tell exactly what the average is. Much like everything else in the NFL, the two sides aren’t exactly meshing and their disagreements continue to leave us a little bit confused.

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Category: NFL
Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 8, 2012 5:09 pm
 

Is it 3 1/2 years or is it six?

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hgtrerte
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 3, 2011 9:25 am
This comment has been removed.

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Since: Jan 7, 2007
Posted on: April 21, 2011 9:56 pm
 

Is it 3 1/2 years or is it six?

How can they add players who haven't even played yet.  That's an extra 368 players that should not even be included in the totals.



Since: Jun 25, 2009
Posted on: April 21, 2011 5:00 pm
 

Is it 3 1/2 years or is it six?

THE NFLPA IS THE BIGGEST JOKE AROUND THESE DAYS.  Are you kidding me?  I've been saying for years their numbers are way off and that chart above proves everything I said to be true.  About 20 percent of the NFLPA's number includes players that never made it at all... as in ZERO SEASONS....  They include 900 players that didn't make it through 2 seasons in the NFL which is ridiculous.  Take those 900 players out and the average goes up to around 7.5 which is much closer to the real number then 3.5 is.   The only players that didn't make it through 2 seasons I would count in their average is players that did or would have made it but suffered a career ending injury anywhere from their first training camp through their 2nd season.  That would at least make some sense.... but to include players in an average that weren't good enough to play in the NFL just proves what a huge joke the NFLPA has become.... 
Second of all there are only 32 teams with 53 man rosters.  Multiply those 2 numbers together and you get 1696, not 1888.  The NFLPA is including an extra 192 players in their calculations teams aren't even allowed to carry.  Sorry, don't tell me players on the practice squad count now for God sakes.  Every number the NFLPA puts out there is bogus... a lie... garbage to say the least.  How can ANYBODY out there take the unions side in this fight and believe a thing the NFLPA says???  Unless you are severely mathematically challenged you can't possibly agree with the union on this one.  


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