Blog Entry

NFLPA memo details nearly 2 years of CBA talks

Posted on: May 17, 2011 5:40 pm
Edited on: May 17, 2011 5:41 pm
 
Posted by Will Brinson

The NFLPA's negotiations and collective bargaining with the NFL during the past four years has centered squarely around avoiding a lockout through the implementation of a "pegged cap," according to a five-page NFLPA memo obtained by CBSSports.com.

This document sheds perhaps the most light to date on the specifics of back-and-forth -- formal or otherwise -- between the two sides through the current labor negotiations.

According to the document, the NFLPA and NFL discussed -- either in a bargaining session, meeting or via telephone -- the "pegged cap" issue nine times from June 2010 through March of 2011.

A September 2010 meeting with Commissioner Roger Goodell and NFL lead counsel Jeff Pash is specifically detailed, in which the pair reviewed "in writing" the pegged cap concept.

The document also notes that during a Super Bowl bargaining session the NFL stated a need to "examine the pegged cap concept in more detail" and later respond. The Super Bowl bargaining sessions were cut short; per the memo the "NFL walked out, claiming a fundamental misunderstanding."

It was later reported that the now-infamous exchange between Panthers owner Jerry Richardson and Drew Brees/Peyton Manning may have caused the split.

The document, recently distributed to players to simplify the chain of labor-related events over the past years, also focuses on the inability of the NFLPA to procure financial details from the NFL.
NFL Labor

According to the document, the NFLPA requested "audited financial statements and other financial information from the clubs and the League" at least a dozen times between May 2009 and November 2010.

The NFL responded, per the memo, by sending one page of "limited cost data" in November of 2009, and four pages of "League-wide cost information" from 2007 and 2008. In contrast, Pash said in March 2011 that the union had received unprecedented financial data from the league.

During the November 2009 session in which the NFL provided the single sheet of financial information, they also introduced the rookie wage scale and "18% rollback" of the salary cap, per the memo.

This 18% rollback was deemed necessary again at the Super Bowl negotiating meetings -- based on the document, the owners deemed such a rollback necessary to give "additional incentive" to invest in their teams.

Among all these discussions, however, the biggest issue at hand seems to be the difference in the split of revenue. The NFL repeatedly claimed a "70/30" split, while the NFLPA reiterated, according to the memo, that "it is closer to 50/50 after [the] $1 billion deduction."

It also seems that the "pegged cap" issue provided the most movement of any issue within the realm of labor negotiations. Several back-and-forths occurred, per the memo, and multiple proposals were exchanged, before the decision from Special Master Stephen Burbank that awarded the players damages in the television contracts case.

Whether or not the television contracts became the actual breaking point in negotiations can't be completely ascertained. The only thing that's clear from the document is that there was a chance -- at one point in time -- to avoid a lockout and the situation all parties, including fans, are in now: without football.
Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 8, 2012 6:27 pm
 

NFLPA memo details nearly 2 years of CBA talks

In addition, thank you for that particular posting online site.Market attempting to find up front to endure forces considerably more. Awesome.


hgtrerte
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 3, 2011 10:45 am
This comment has been removed.

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Since: Feb 28, 2008
Posted on: May 19, 2011 9:16 am
 

NFLPA memo details nearly 2 years of CBA talks

That will never happen due to supply and demand, the best players will always be hot commoditites and get the big bucks because there will always be a Jerry Jones, Al Davies type that will pay stupid money to get the best players. The CBA protects the Jacksonville Jaguars and other small market teams of the League, preventing league domination by few teams.



Since: May 19, 2011
Posted on: May 19, 2011 7:43 am
 

NFLPA memo details nearly 2 years of CBA talks

If the union decertified, why do we need a CBA?   Why don't the owners just say this is what we are going to do and if you don't like it go to the CFL.   Set a wage scale based on years of experience with bonuses for good play and tell the players to take it or leave it.   Take the extra money and donate it the school systems.



Since: May 18, 2011
Posted on: May 18, 2011 6:16 pm
 

NFLPA memo details nearly 2 years of CBA talks

Irregardless is not a word.  Would people stop using it, please?



Since: Mar 3, 2008
Posted on: May 18, 2011 8:34 am
 

NFLPA memo details nearly 2 years of CBA talks

Agreed. What a stupid post! You shouldn't be on here insulting anyone with your ignorant responses.



Since: Oct 20, 2006
Posted on: May 17, 2011 11:35 pm
 

NFLPA memo details nearly 2 years of CBA talks

irregardless.....what a stupid post by you.



Since: Apr 14, 2007
Posted on: May 17, 2011 7:56 pm
 

NFLPA memo details nearly 2 years of CBA talks

But it is cute he linked to his other shoddy "reports."



Since: Apr 14, 2007
Posted on: May 17, 2011 7:54 pm
 

NFLPA memo details nearly 2 years of CBA talks

And because it's from the NFLPA, we know it is not true.


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