Blog Entry

Goodell: Lockout 'clearly had an impact' on fans

Posted on: May 25, 2011 12:33 pm
Edited on: May 26, 2011 6:26 am
 
Posted by Will Brinson

The NFL wrapped its spring owners meetings in Indianapolis on Wednesday, and afterward, as is customary, Roger Goodell took the stage to talk about rule changes, the state of football and this lockout thing.

Though Goodell sidestepped a couple of issues -- the window needed for free agency, most notably -- he was refreshingly candid about the damage done by the lockout

"I think it's clearly had an impact on our fans," Goodell said. "You can see that in the various metrics that we have -- whether it's ratings or for traffic on NFL.com. We see that.

"And that is a reflection on the uncertainty and frustration of our fans. And we all understand that. There are also financial consequences because of that, but clearly -- if we're not successful, that's clearly to come."

Asked as a follow-up if the lockout had affected season-ticket sales, Goodell didn't hesitate to point out that the respective clubs were all suffering when it came to locking down ticket sales.

"It clearly has an impact [on season ticket sales]," Goodell said. "Fans want certainty. I don't think you can ever underestimate -- fans are still going through challenges, just in the general economy. And those challenges continue to impact on their decisions. And rightfully so.
Owners Meetings/Labor News

And that's something they have to balance when they want to put down money for a season ticket or a club seat or whatever else. And so we have to keep that in mind. The ownership has been reminded of that during the past couple of days, and they don't need reminding, because they're on the front line."

Most interesting was Goodell's response to a request for "specific data" about the impact of the lockout. He seemed absolutely amenable to providing the requested information, if only because it clearly showed the problems that the lockout is causing around the league, from the standpoint of keeping fans interested and generating revenue.

"It's a noticeable change," Goodell said. "I think you guys are aware of it -- our ratings were down in the draft for example. Roughly four million people -- that's a noticeable decrease ... about a 10 percent decrease as I recall."

While no fans want to hear about the revenue that the league, its teams and the players are currently losing, it is a significant point of interest, because money that gets thrown out the window during a labor impasse directly correlates to the difficulty in finding an agreement down the road.

"The longer it goes the more damage is done to the game and the more revenue's down and that means less money that can be divided between the parties," Goodell said.

Owners were presented the full range of plans for opening weekend, from the first game on Thursday night at Lambeau Field to commemorations of the Sept. 11 attacks on the first full Sunday of games. Those dates are not in jeopardy yet, but the longer the impasse, the more in danger they would become, particularly with the league's marketing partners, sponsors and advertisers who must commit dollars to those events well in advance.

"We're not at an Armageddon date," Eric Grubman, executive vice president of business operations for the NFL, told the Associated Press. "We're not staring that in the face this week."

But like any event looming on the horizon, the theoretically non-existent drop-dead date isn't actually that far off. But, apparently, it won't impact the way Goodell and the NFL head into the next season.

"We're approaching 2011," Goodell added, "as we would any other season."

The Associated Press contributed to this report. For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 8, 2012 3:25 pm
 

Goodell: Lockout 'clearly had an impact' on fans

That would be really compelling acquire the utilization executed you might have accumulated composed for us. Most people would will be aware that most a lot of tasks could very well get here planning no more almost anyone. You got acknowledged with me some polished future now.


fghdfre
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 3, 2012 2:25 am
This comment has been removed.

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hgtrerte
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 3, 2011 7:37 am
This comment has been removed.

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tomlye
Since: Nov 28, 2011
Posted on: December 1, 2011 11:14 am
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Since: Jan 15, 2008
Posted on: June 26, 2011 9:10 pm
 

Goodell: Lockout 'clearly had an impact' on fans

I am done with frickin football if we lose 1 game to this lockout! The one from years ago sucked with the scrub players. Hopefully the NFL wouldnt do that again!!!



Since: Apr 25, 2008
Posted on: May 27, 2011 9:13 am
 

Goodell: Lockout 'clearly had an impact' on fans

Davido - you make very valid points and I can agree with you to some degree.  The league is not run as a normal business and the restrictions on players is not normal in most working situations.  With that said, maybe they should get rid of salary caps, collective bargining, anti-trust laws etc, let the players demand what they want salary wise, let the teams that want to pay that amount do so, let the ticket prices soar and then let the fans decide what everyone is worth like a true free market.  Maybe after an initial increase in salaries and ticket prices and no one shows up tickets prices, player salaries and owner profits will decrease.



Since: Sep 13, 2007
Posted on: May 26, 2011 6:12 pm
 

Goodell: Lockout 'clearly had an impact' on fans

Davido - If the players don't like the money they are making for job they are asked to do, they can walk away and work like the rest of us have to.  Sounds as though you are on team Socialism, take from the rich and give to the poor with your nonsense response. Pretty sure the owners have assistants to get them drinks and shine their shoes, they don't ask the players to do that stuff.  The owners pay the players to play the game and they all get paid quite nicely to run around and play a game. 
dcn - I agree that the players are paid quite nicely. However, they are free to pursue more money if they can get just like you and me. The owners are the ones on team Socialism - they are not running a regular business. First, the NFL owners are protected from anti-trust laws that regular businesses do not enjoy. The anti-trust immunity has been granted in large part to the special relationship between the teams and the players. This was represented by the collective bargaining agreem,ent that the owners chose to walk away from. The owners are also not like regular businesses becaue most businesses depend on ttheir own revenues or business loans to make capital expenditures such as buildings. The NFL owners have been using the tax payers to use public money to build stadiums that they then make money from.

Another point is that the players are not regular employees like the accountants and the assistants that are fetching the owner's drinks and shining their shoes. The players negotiate contracts (that are subject to salary caps which in most industries would be considered illegal collusion). However, the players are not free to offer their services to the highest bidder (also an infringment on basci free emterprise) due to the free agency rules. The players have talents that most otjers do not have, even the "scrubs" who are fortunate enough to make an NFL roster have skills that are way beyond the vast majority of people that play the sport.

The owners are not using their money to pay the players - most of the revenue comes from television contracts that the league has negotiated. That money is then given to the franchises in order to maintain parity among the franchises. This issue much more complicated than a simple - the player is an employee and has no right to demand money from the business owners who have risked everything to build a business. The NFL and the 32 franchises are one of the most protected industries in the country and little risk has been taken by those owners who have come along since the advent of the television contracts which has made them (owners and players) richer than anyone could have ever anticipated.



Since: Dec 7, 2007
Posted on: May 26, 2011 4:52 pm
 

Goodell: Lockout 'clearly had an impact' on fans

someone please fire this idiot Roger Goodell



Since: Apr 25, 2008
Posted on: May 26, 2011 3:42 pm
 

Goodell: Lockout 'clearly had an impact' on fans

Davido - If the players don't like the money they are making for job they are asked to do, they can walk away and work like the rest of us have to.  Sounds as though you are on team Socialism, take from the rich and give to the poor with your nonsense response. Pretty sure the owners have assistants to get them drinks and shine their shoes, they don't ask the players to do that stuff.  The owners pay the players to play the game and they all get paid quite nicely to run around and play a game.  




Since: Sep 13, 2007
Posted on: May 26, 2011 3:20 pm
 

Goodell: Lockout 'clearly had an impact' on fans

I am tired of guys that are much wealthier than me bickering over money.  I want anyone who works a regualr job like me to go to their boss, demand to see their books, then demand more money and see how long you stay employed.  The players should be grateful that they are able to play a sport as their job and make pretty good money doing so, even the scrubs are pulling down a couple hundred thousand a year.  The players are employees, the owners are the bosses.  Bosses do what they want when they want, if you don't like it, go get another job.  I don't feel sorry for the owners either though, they cry poor, but give me a break, most of these guys have private jets, yachts etc.  Don't feel sorry for any of them, but I side with the owners.  If you as a player do not like your deal, go find another job or by the team and pay yourself what you want to.
Yas suh Boss!  Kin I shine your shoos and get you a drink too?


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