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Blog Entry

Break from CBA talks needs to become a gut check

Posted on: July 1, 2011 10:31 pm
Edited on: July 1, 2011 10:43 pm
 
Posted by Will Brinson

The NFL and NFLPA are taking the holiday weekend off from negotiating a new CBA. Some folks might see this as a problem, because it means a break from negotiations and continued progress.

However, there's reason to think that this weekend could be a gamechanger, provided that both sides remember exactly what "negotiating" means.

As CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman reported over the past few days, the owners are presenting scenarios that don't fit in line with what they'd previously offered, and the NFLPA lawyers are refusing to budge on the issue of retired-player benefits. That, folks, is not negotiating, unless the word suddenly became a synonym for "being stubborn."

This weekend shouldn't be a time to sit around and gripe about who said what in which room, and whether this or that proposal was insulting. This is a weekend to realize that America is sitting around enjoying the summer, not really complaining about the lack of football, and patiently waiting for the two sides to strike a deal.

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This weekend needs to be the two sides talking apart from one another and understanding that now is a time for a negotiation gut check.

The NFL needs to understand that it HAS to give in on certain areas, and the NFLPA needs to understand that it HAS to find some leeway on others.

That might sound silly and obvious, but it's -- plainly -- exactly what comprises negotiating.

We've constantly heard leaders from both sides preach about dialogue and the need for bargaining during this process. And we've constantly been told that there's ample reason for optimism despite the fact that there's not any football on the horizon.

But there's no concrete proof of any actual negotiating; there's no guarantee that either one of the sides can willingly find some room for concessions that will forward the progress of the best sport in the country.

And that's why a break is critical -- everyone involved in the negotiations of a new CBA for the NFL needs to take this time off to realize just how close we are to the beginning of the football season, to assess the goals of these negotiations, to figure out what the respective breaking points of each side on each issue are, and to find a way to hammer out a deal when negotiations resume on Tuesday.

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fghdfre
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 2, 2012 3:41 pm
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hgtrerte
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 2, 2011 9:50 pm
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tomlye
Since: Nov 28, 2011
Posted on: November 30, 2011 4:40 pm
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Since: Oct 16, 2009
Posted on: July 3, 2011 12:20 am
 

Break from CBA talks needs to become a gut check

This break is time for both sides to realize that fans are getting more and more serious about hating both sides of this thing, and every day they don't get something done they are literally losing more fans...the ones who create the revenue they're discussing how to divy up.

What's a higher pecent of zero? I'm no math genius, but even I can see that a lower pecent of a bigger number is better for both sides, and if the fans are left to grow their disinterest in these idiots, they'll end up splitting a much smaller pot.



Since: Mar 25, 2011
Posted on: July 2, 2011 10:01 pm
 

Break from CBA talks needs to become a gut check

The owners are starting to look really bad, if their deal breaker is about retired players!!
 



Since: Mar 29, 2010
Posted on: July 2, 2011 3:24 pm
 

Break from CBA talks needs to become a gut check

The players didn't call for a lockout, they were satisfied with the most successful professional league in the world.  The owners are the ones that called for this-insisting the players "compromise" by giving them more of the revenue, more control and a longers season.   For a "compromise"-don't both sides have to give something?


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com