Blog Entry

New drug punishment system could help Williams

Posted on: August 23, 2011 7:20 pm
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K. Williams could be facing a two-game suspension rather than a four-game suspension (US Presswire).Posted by Josh Katzowitz

It looks like the fallout from the StarCaps case* finally will end, and it might have given way to a completely new way to punish those who test positive for drugs.

The St. Paul Pioneer Press is reporting that Kevin Williams will have his original four-game suspension for violating the league’s substance abuse policy reduced to two games, because, in this new (still hypothetical) system of punishment, the NFL could suspend those players either for two games or for six games.

*Which gave reporters a tiny intro into legal reporting before the lockout hit and made us all reach for our law review books.

In April, a Minnesota court ruled that the NFL could proceed with the suspension of Williams (and former Vikings defensive tackle Pat Williams and Saints defensive end Will Smith), who had tested positive for a banned diuretic that was not listed in the ingredients of the StarCaps weight loss supplement he had been taking.

Which, at this point, should be OK with Williams.

In May, he claimed he was at peace with the court’s decision, saying, “With all this (lockout stuff) going on, maybe (the NFL will) forget about it and we can go on with our regular work. If it happens, it happens. I found a great place to work out in Little Rock. I'll be there getting ready and see you in Week 5, if that's the case."

Funny thing, the NFL didn’t forget it, but it sounds like the league is willing to go a little lighter on his suspension as well.

The reason for that, writes the Pioneer Press, is because, while the NFL and NFLPA meet to figure out if the union will accept HGH testing, the two sides would implement that new punishment system for positive drug tests -- two-game suspensions for diuretics and six games for steroids.

Since Williams fits into the former category, he automatically would go from four to two.

-In other Kevin Williams news, the Pioneer Press writes that he has plantar fasciitis and will miss the final two preseason games.

"Everything's good, though," Williams said. "Just trying to take some precautions, find out exactly what's going on. I'll be ready for the season. It's nothing bad."

Asked if he’d be ready to play in the season-opener against the Chargers, he said, “I’ll be there.”

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Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 16, 2012 9:04 pm
 

New drug punishment system could help Williams



hgtrerte
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 26, 2011 9:44 am
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tomlye
Since: Nov 28, 2011
Posted on: November 29, 2011 5:23 am
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Since: Sep 2, 2011
Posted on: September 2, 2011 11:36 pm
 

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Since: Aug 20, 2007
Posted on: August 23, 2011 9:37 pm
 

New drug punishment system could help Williams

"if the union will accept HGH testing" Why is this even a question? HGH is a PED. Period. It should be an automatic 6 game suspension for a first offense, like steroids. Unless, of course, a doctor prescribes it for a valid medical condition where it is the best course of treatment and it is independently verifiable by league retained physicians (not team doctors). Same for steroids - they can be medically relevant and they shouldn't be banned from using them for appropriate conditions if that is the best course. Of course, that "best course" would probably not occur while a player is active, so generally only someone on IR would be using them under a doctor's care for healing injuries.


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