Blog Entry

Dan Pastorini feels let down by NFL, NFLPA

Posted on: August 31, 2011 8:26 am
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Dan Pastorini is upset with the way he feels been treated by the NFL and the NFLPA (US Presswire).Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Dan Pastorini is mad. He’s mad at the NFL owners. He’s mad at the NFL Players Association. And he’s mad at Drew Brees.

“F--- Drew Brees,” Pastorini said.

Pastorini is mad at the way he feels he and his former NFL compatriots have been treated, and though Brees isn’t the true villain in this movie, he’s also an easy target for something he said two years ago.

Pastorini looks at the new CBA deal and figures out how much more money he’ll receive as a player who retired before 1993. He remembers how much he made when he was playing quarterback for the Oilers, Rams, Raiders and Eagles from 1971-82. Then, he thinks about the NFL Players Association and the NFL owners -- and the labor fight for which he couldn’t participate -- and his blood boils.

He gets mad, really mad, and he lets loose on a rant in which he places blame on both sides who he believes simply doesn’t care about the men who helped build the NFL into what it is today.

The $620 million “Legacy Fund” added to the new CBA for the players who retired before 1993 that will be used to increase pensions? And the $300 million in other benefits, including those for health? It’s simply not good enough for Pastorini. Not good enough for how much he says he sacrificed.

“I’m going to get an extra $1,000 a month. Big f------ deal,” the 62-year-old Pastorini told CBSSports.com recently. “I think it’s a travesty the way they treat the older players. I’m part of that group. They’re throwing us a bone with the $620 million. By the time they get to a new CBA after 10 years, they won’t have to worry about us pre-93er’s. It’s sad, but it’s their M.O. They want to wait for us to die.

“What they’re talking about now is to give us a bone and to shut us up. It’s just wrong. It’s damn wrong. And the players association is just as greedy as the owners are, if not more so. The players don’t go to bat for us, which makes us ashamed.”

And what Brees said in 2009 when discussing retired players who complained about their benefits -- as recounted here by CBSSports.com’s Mike Freeman -- really upsets Pastorini.

“There's some guys out there that have made bad business decisions,” Brees said then. “They took their pensions early because they never went out and got a job. They've had a couple divorces and they're making payments to this place and that place. And that's why they don't have money. And they're coming to us to basically say, 'Please make up for my bad judgment.' In that case, that's not our fault as players."

It might have seemed Brees was talking directly to Pastorini, who’s had to declare bankruptcy twice and has been divorced after ending his one-time Pro Bowl career. Clearly, Pastorini feels that Brees -- who is making $7.4 million this year and could be the next quarterback to win a $90 million contract -- made it personal.

“My first year’s salary was $25,000, then $30,000, then $35,000,” Pastorini said. “These guys make my first contract in a game. Look at (former NFLPA executive director) Gene Upshaw and what he left his wife when he died? How did he leave her $15 million? They’ve been screwing us from day one. My pension was $1,100 a month, then $1,200, then $1,400, and now it’ll be $1,750. No medical, no disability -- $1700 doesn’t even pay for my rent.”

Not surprisingly, the NFL has a slightly different opinion.

Said NFL spokesman Greg Aiello in a statement to CBSSports.com: “We respectfully disagree with Dan.” The NFLPA declined comment on the issue.

But let’s look at the other side of the story. Before the newest CBA, the Legacy Fund didn’t exist. The NFL and the NFLPA are both contributing at least $300 million over the next 10 years to add more money for former players. If it’s $1,000 more a month for a retiree, that’s $1,000 more than that former player had before.

And though Brees’ statement continues to backfire on him and the union, those close to Brees says he was one of the retired players’ biggest advocates in trying to give back to the players who came before him -- and to get everybody to understand the importance of doing so. Witness a radio interview he gave last April to XX 1090 in San Diego.

“I know that I’m fighting for so many people here, for former players in the form of improving their pensions and disability benefits to take care of those guys that built this game for us and future players too,” he said. “To be honest with you, this is one of those things that when a settlement is reached, that settlement is something that I’m probably never going to benefit from. It’s guys before me, it’s guys that are going to come after me. So for me, there’s so many guys that made sacrifices before us to make this game better.”

Dan Pastorini with Bum Phillips, Wade Phillips and Bob McNair (Getty). Pastorini (second from the left in the photo to the left) has good reason to want better medical benefits as well. With so much newly emerging information about chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Pastorini is worried that he’s going to be suffering from the dementia-like condition if he lives long enough.

“I’ve been to clinics. I’ve been put on vitamin regimens. I find myself not remembering people’s names,” said Pastorini, who said he sustained at least a dozen concussions when he played. “I’ll go to the kitchen for a cup of coffee, and I can’t remember why I went in there. It’s possible I have that. I won’t know until they cut my brain open.”

Pastorini isn’t alone in his thoughts. During Super Bowl week in Dallas, the NFL Alumni held a press conference that featured former players who were fighting -- and outspoken in their demand -- for better pension benefits and long-term health care.

But in reality, what can the NFL and the NFLPA say to fully satisfy the league’s alumni? Probably nothing, and to their credit, both sides feel like they’ve tried to improve the conditions for the retirees. But to Pastorini, it’s just not good enough.

“There’s a lot of greed in this business,” Pastorini said. “We’re the guys on the outside looking in, and we’re never going to be compensated for what we do. We built the game, and these guys should be kissing our ass now. But they’re not.”

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Comments

Since: Feb 24, 2007
Posted on: September 6, 2011 9:38 am
 

Dan Pastorini feels let down by NFL, NFLPA

What Pastorini fails to realize or aknowledge is when he was in the NFL he was part of "the show". HIS generation failed to help legacy players and themselves by not providing a product the viewing public was buying in numbers equal to today.  IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PLAYERS to provide a product the general public will buy. HE AND HIS ILK FAILED TO DO THIS....the NBA realized this when Magic and Byrd "saved" the NBA.  Pro athletes today are 24/7/365,  not six weeks of Training Camp, Six Preseason Games and 12 Regular Season Games.  MOST, not all, of today's players treat the NFL as a business, not pot-bellied drunks who only quit partying long enough to sober-up by game time. As far as Pastorini's comments toward Drew Brees...I am sure Drew will let Dan come over and do some of his lawn work/gardening if he needs few bucks for another pint of gin and a pound of bolagna.



Since: Dec 21, 2008
Posted on: September 6, 2011 9:30 am
 

Dan Pastorini feels let down by NFL, NFLPA

"Really. You are turning this into a political point. LOL. So what you are saying is, if you help someone make more money, you don't dererve any of it. Good to now. It's people like you who have no clue that allow CEO's to make 353 times more than their lowest paid employee. Yeah, how's that for entitlement, but that's okay to you. What a joke."

epchargers....come on man.  Pastorini retired in 1983.  The NFL was NOT the money making machine it is today.  I'm sure he is getting his percentage comperable to what he contributed to the league and its funds during his time as an active player.

He hasnt contributed one ounce of sweat or blood compated to what the current players have towards what the NFL is earning today.   I support the current players for wanting more because the NFL would be nothing without them.

Pastorini should "STFU" (to quote Chris Johnson) and enjoy what he's getting.  What stopped him from working post his NFL career?  Its not like he retired at 65 from football.




Since: Jul 18, 2007
Posted on: September 6, 2011 7:43 am
 

Dan Pastorini feels let down by NFL, NFLPA

What an idiot..

Here is why.... 

“I’m going to get an extra $1,000 a month. Big f------ deal,” 
Fine give it to me.  An extra 12k a year is lot for most people in this country.

 “I think it’s a travesty the way they treat the older players. I’m part of that group. They’re throwing us a bone with the $620 million. By the time they get to a new CBA after 10 years, they won’t have to worry about us pre-93er’s. It’s sad, but it’s their M.O. They want to wait for us to die. 

That is HUGE bone.  620,000,000!!!!!  Who#s the greedy b@sterd?


“What they’re talking about now is to give us a bone and to shut us up. It’s just wrong. It’s damn wrong. And the players association is just as greedy as the owners are, if not more so. The players don’t go to bat for us, which makes us ashamed.”
And you had the chance as a player a couple times to secure higher benifits for yourselves and those players retired at the time.  What did you achieve, nothing!


“My first year’s salary was $25,000, then $30,000, then $35,000,” Pastorini said. “These guys make my first contract in a game. Look at (former NFLPA executive director) Gene Upshaw and what he left his wife when he died? How did he leave her $15 million? They’ve been screwing us from day one. My pension was $1,100 a month, then $1,200, then $1,400, and now it’ll be $1,750. No medical, no disability -- $1700 doesn’t even pay for my rent.”
That salary was for 1971. That was really big money at the time. You should have invested it wisely like many other players did. Now, because you mis-managed you are whining about it and blaming others.


Pastorini (second from the left in the photo to the left) has good reason to want better medical benefits as well. With so much newly emerging information about , Pastorini is worried that he’s going to be suffering from the dementia-like condition if he lives long enough.
Obviously it has set ine.  


“There’s a lot of greed in this business,” Pastorini said. “We’re the guys on the outside looking in, and we’re never going to be compensated for what we do. We built the game, and these guys should be kissing our ass now. But they’re not.”
Did you kiss the ass of your predecessors? No. 

Shut the F- up you hypocrite!



 



Since: May 31, 2009
Posted on: September 5, 2011 11:45 pm
 

Dan Pastorini feels let down by NFL, NFLPA

In response to your response...

1)  EVERYONE deserves to get paid what they can.  If your boss offers you more money because you are very good at your job you should take it and I congratulate you.  If another company is willing to double your salary you should take it and again I would congratulate you.  If you go back to school at night, get additional education, develop leadership skills, prove yourself worthy of leading a company and are then offered 350 times your previous salary then you should take it and again I would congratulate you. 

2)  You make a distinction between a publicly traded company and a privately held company and in my opinion there is no difference in this regard; In both instances there is an entity that owns the company.  In both instances the decsions are made by the shareholders.  It just so happens that in a private company there is only one sharehoilder and in a public company there are many.  Since you are willing to concecde that a private owner of a company has the right to set their wage scale why won't you concede multiple owners the same rights? 

3)  The combination of my last two points then begs the following question...

Is it your opinion that the CEO's should turn the money down, or is it your opinion that you have the right to tell shareholders how they may spend their money?

4) What you seem to be losing sight of is that workers accept these wages.

5)  This has nothing to do with Ayn Rand and her vision of the world. 

6) While it is obvious that we see the world very diffrently I appreciate the conversation and thanks.

Have a good day.




Since: Jan 16, 2007
Posted on: September 5, 2011 10:49 pm
 

Dan Pastorini feels let down by NFL, NFLPA

In regards to the comments on CEO's .... that they "deserve it." They deserve 350% more than their average workers??? What you seem to be losing site of is CEO's, on a de facto basis, control the pay scale. There are boards, etc. that set the pay, but their all in on the game ... the more the CEP's get, the more they get, and on down the line. If it's a private company and the owner wants to set his pay scale high, terrific. Those people can make 1,000 times their average workers salary if they can handle it. The public company grift has gotten to be crazy. This is not what Ayn Rand had in mind my conservative friends!

Also, Patorini seems like a cry baby. This is not entitlement (which is also an issue ... big money corporate greed and entitlement mony can both be issues simultabeously. It does not have to be a one-or-the-other deal) on Pastorini's part. He wants to be paid ad infitum for his past work ... don't we all Dan! But that's not the reality. 



Since: Aug 11, 2010
Posted on: September 5, 2011 10:06 pm
 

Dan Pastorini feels let down by NFL, NFLPA

 Dear Dan Pastorini its hard to feel sorry for guys like you.Ive been paying ss since 1981 I'm now 47 I will probably not see a penny. So please don't complian just make better descions with your cash. Like drag racing how much money did you lose on that. Ihear if you want to make a small fortion in racing start out with a big one.



Since: May 31, 2009
Posted on: September 5, 2011 8:31 pm
 

Dan Pastorini feels let down by NFL, NFLPA

"Really. You are turning this into a political point. LOL. So what you are saying is, if you help someone make more money, you don't dererve any of it. Good to now. It's people like you who have no clue that allow CEO's to make 353 times more than their lowest paid employee. Yeah, how's that for entitlement, but that's okay to you. What a joke."



Dan Pastorini is an example of the entitlement nation regardless of your red herring about CEO's.  The guy made his money and was entitled to a certain retirement; now he thinks he deserves more than the deal HE played under allowed.  That is the epitome of entitlement. 

Now as far as CEO's go... CEO's are deserving of the money because they have found someone willing to pay them that amount.  If you find someone to pay you 353 times more than the a CEO congratulations.  If you can't find that someone to pay you that much then improve your skill set and find someone to hire you for that amount.  If you don't want to take the time and effort to gain the skills that will allow you to earn more that is OK; just stop being so jealous of those that have earned it.

 

PS:  Spelling is a good place to start if you decide that you would like to improve your lot in life.







Since: Sep 12, 2007
Posted on: September 5, 2011 4:29 pm
 

Dan Pastorini feels let down by NFL, NFLPA

"Dan Pastorini is a case study in our entitlement nation."

Really. You are turning this into a political point. LOL. So what you are saying is, if you help someone make more money, you don't dererve any of it. Good to now. It's people like you who have no clue that allow CEO's to make 353 times more than their lowest paid employee. Yeah, how's that for entitlement, but that's okay to you. What a joke.



Since: Sep 27, 2006
Posted on: September 5, 2011 4:22 pm
 

Dan Pastorini feels let down by NFL, NFLPA

I think it's a little harsh to say Pastorini was below average. The Oilers under Bum Phillips had a decent defense, with one great year. On offense, they were a team that ran the ball, none too well, by committee, and had no real receiver threat (besides the modest numbers of Ken Burrough).  Billy "White Shoes" Johnson provided spark for the offense on punt and kick returns but was pedestrian as a wideout. By the time Earl Campbell arrived, for Pastorini's last two seasons, Earl was the offense and Pastorini was on his way out.


On the Non-football stuff:

From the National Conference of State Legislatures, which I think we can fairly say is not a blatantly pro-union or pro-labor entity.

http://www.ncsl.org/?tabid=13344

I.  The At-Will Presumption

Employment relationships are presumed to be “at-will” in all U.S. states except Montana.  The U.S. is one of a handful of countries where employment is predominantly at-will.  Most countries throughout the world allow employers to dismiss employees only for cause.   Some reasons given for our retention of the at-will presumption include respect for freedom of contract, employer deference, and the belief that both employers and employees favor an at-will employment relationship over job security.   

A.  At-Will Defined

At-will means that an employer can terminate an employee at any time for any reason, except an illegal one, or for no reason without incurring legal liability.  Likewise, an employee is free to leave a job at any time for any or no reason with no adverse legal consequences.

At-will also means that an employer can change the terms of the employment relationship with no notice and no consequences.  For example, an employer can alter wages, terminate benefits, or reduce paid time off.  In its unadulterated form, the U.S. at-will rule leaves employees vulnerable to arbitrary and sudden dismissal, a limited or on-call work schedule depending on the employer’s needs, and unannounced cuts in pay and benefits.  (more)





Since: May 23, 2008
Posted on: September 5, 2011 3:41 pm
 

Dan Pastorini feels let down by NFL, NFLPA

Well, so what about his post-NFL investments?  The players then didn't get compensated adequately for what they did, period

You are incorrect.


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com