Blog Entry

Report: Eagles assistants had to be separated

Posted on: November 28, 2011 10:05 am
 
Posted by Josh Katzowitz

As if things couldn’t get any worse in Philadelphia, there were reports after the Eagles 38-20 loss to the Patriots that assistant coaches Marty Mornhinweg and Jim Washburn got into a verbal confrontation on the sideline and actually had to be separated before it got physical.

Week 12 in review
And it actually occurred when Philadelphia was still leading New England.

According to CSN Philly, the two have not had problems with each other before, and while there’s been no official word on why the two went after each other on the sideline Sunday, the Philadelphia Daily News speculated that Washburn -- the defensive line coach -- didn’t appreciate the play-calling of Mornhinweg, the offensive coordinator.

Particularly during the second quarter when the Patriots were in the middle of a 17-point spree and Mornhinweg continued calling for pass after pass (you’ll note that Vince Young threw for 400 yards but LeSean McCoy only recorded 10 carries). At one point, the Eagles went three-and-out on three incomplete passes, not giving Philadelphia’s defense enough time to rest.

Which might have contributed to a terrible second quarter for the Eagles defense. Not to mention an upset Washburn.

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Comments

Since: Mar 13, 2008
Posted on: November 29, 2011 11:32 am
 

Report: Eagles assistants had to be separated

You're only half right. Yes, a passing play takes up the same amount of real time as a running play.  However, the reason to run against a team like the Pats is to use up game clock so Brady has less possessions and runs fewer plays. This in turn gives the defense more rest. Another benefit, running plays also tire out the opposing team's defensive line more quickly. And when you have a top three running back, it's a waste not to utilize him to the max especially when you have a second stringer at QB.



Since: Mar 13, 2008
Posted on: November 29, 2011 11:32 am
 

Report: Eagles assistants had to be separated

You're only half right. Yes, a passing play takes up the same amount of real time as a running play.  However, the reason to run against a team like the Pats is to use up game clock so Brady has less possessions and runs fewer plays. This in turn gives the defense more rest. Another benefit, running plays also tire out the opposing team's defensive line more quickly. And when you have a top three running back, it's a waste not to utilize him to the max especially when you have s second stringer at QB.



Since: Oct 27, 2011
Posted on: November 29, 2011 11:24 am
 

Report: Eagles assistants had to be separated

It's a similar problem in Dallas, but the owner and GM are one and the same.  We have a great owner and an absolutely clueless GM.



Since: Jan 20, 2009
Posted on: November 29, 2011 10:21 am
 

Report: Eagles assistants had to be separated

I'm not an Eagles fan, but it seems there are two kinds of coaches. One plays to their strengths, are able to adapt to changes in personnel and get the most out of a 53-man roster. The other, the Andy Reid-archetype, believes in a system, and is inflexible in his game planning as he desperately tries to mold the players into his ideal of what he's convinced is the winning strategy. The latter must necessarily rely heavily on free-agency, while the former tend to build a team around successful drafts.
For instance, the Steelers were always a running team, but Bruce Arians, who is mostly disliked in Pittsburgh, finally developed an offense based on his personnel: Big Ben, Heath Miller, Hines Ward and a stable of three young stallions basically demanded they go with a pass-first style. Mendenhall and a patchwork and mediocre (at best) O-Line left them no choice. Kudos for making the change.
Reid has always had a pass-first mentality even when he had excellent running backs. He was fortunate with Brian Westbrook in that he was such great receiver, too. LeSean McCoy's skill-set is just not being utilized. He's a dynamic player who scored touchdowns in nine of 11 games this year. He only has 38 yards receiving, but is averaging 5.3 yard per carry and has 11 TD's and no fumbles. Total touches on Sunday: 14. Are you kidding me? Reminded me of the Titans philosophy with CJ0K early this year.
And with Vince Young's foot-in-mouth "Dream Team" talk early this season, I decided to research team payrolls, considering how much the Eagles seemed to be spending on Free Agents. Man, was I surprised. 2011 estimated payrolls...Check it out:
Arizona $83 million, Atlanta $102.1 million, Baltimore $101.3 million, Buffalo $96.4 million, Carolina $73 million, Chicago $104.9 million, Cincinnati $90.7 million, Cleveland $99.2 million, Dallas $136.6 million, Denver $125 million, Detroit $113.8 million, Green Bay $129.8 million, Houston $118.4 million, Indianapolis $115.5 million, Jacksonville $78.1 million, Kansas City $74.7 million, Miami $103.1 million, Minnesota $108.4 million, New England $102.3 million, New Orleans $105.2 million, New York Giants $126.3 million, New York Jets $128.5 million, Oakland $85.8 million, Philadelphia $80.8 million, Pittsburgh $116 million, San Diego $85.8 million, San Francisco $100.9 million, Seattle $81.1 million, St. Louis $102.4 million, Tampa Bay $59.7 million, Tennessee $107.4 million and Washington $115.2 million. I can't wrap my head around this. I thought Philly went all-in this year, but the numbers say otherwise.
Anyway, my point is Reid has been blessed with players who fit his narrow-minded strategy for many years. But this is a different team with new strengths and weaknesses. And in my opinion, Reid is now part of the problem, not the solution. And lastly, if he can't keep his own unruly kids off drugs and out of jail, then how in the world is he going to manage a locker room full of immature grown men who have huge egos like Jackson? I almost feel bad for the guy. 



Since: Feb 8, 2008
Posted on: November 29, 2011 9:49 am
 

Report: Eagles assistants had to be separated

Biggest problem is the owner!  Roseman, the GM, has no say whatsoever and has to defer to Reid on matters concerning the team.  What sort of GM is that?  Lurie needs to get his butt out of Hollywood long enough to put some teeth into the GM position and get rid of Reid and several of his players whilel he's at it.  This entire organization needs to be re-vamped before they kill each other!



Since: Aug 19, 2006
Posted on: November 29, 2011 9:05 am
 

Report: Eagles assistants had to be separated

Well, the Pats do have statistically the worst pass defense in the NFL, so trying to throw it around isn't a bad idea.  Of course, a little balance does help.  The thing is, the Eagles just stink this year.....the playcalling doesn't matter, whatever they try to do, they are going to fail.  This isn't a team that is made up of winners.  Too much style, not enough substance.



Since: Dec 21, 2006
Posted on: November 29, 2011 7:58 am
 

Report: Eagles assistants had to be separated

thanks for the lesson professor! Who gives a crap about mispelled words on a cbs blog
no one asked you for your fn grading. Take your marker and head over to yahoo were you belong.
.  



Since: Dec 21, 2006
Posted on: November 29, 2011 7:55 am
 

Report: Eagles assistants had to be separated

reids a top coach on this league, apparently its slipping in philly. When philly does dump him
Reid will be the next teams savior. Jacksonville anyone? 



Since: Nov 7, 2010
Posted on: November 29, 2011 6:14 am
 

Report: Bye Bye Andy

Time for Reid to leave...
he failed on every aspect...Eagles giving him every oppurtunities(payroll always at the top...)...this year..no excuse..



Since: Aug 20, 2006
Posted on: November 29, 2011 4:01 am
 

Report: Eagles assistants had to be separated

Gotta lvoe "sports" writers who don't understand the different between TOP and real time rest.  Three incomplete passes give the D the same amount of rest as three failed running plays.


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