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Blog Entry

Film Room: Giants vs. Falcons wild-card preview

Posted on: January 5, 2012 10:37 am
 
Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit


Both of these teams seem to be peaking at the right time. The Falcons are looking for their first playoff win in the Matt Ryan-Mike Smith-Thomas Dimitroff era; the Giants are looking for a second improbable Super Bowl surge in five years. Here’s the breakdown:


1. Falcons offensive approach
The Falcons spent most of the season trying to figure out if they would remain the two tight end/two-back run-oriented offense that has defined them since Mike Smith and his offensive coordinator Mike Mularkey arrived, or if they’d go ahead and assume the pass-first identity that Thomas Dimitroff committed them to when he traded a bounty for the chance to draft Julio Jones.

In the end, the pass-first approach won out. After fullback Ovie Mughelli went down with a Week 7 knee injury and Jones’ iffy hamstring strengthened, the Falcons drifted to more three-receiver sets and wound up finishing fourth in the league in pass attempts.

They also expanded Ryan’s presnap freedoms. The fourth-year quarterback has considerable power when it comes to audibling and changing protections at the line of scrimmage. In fact, it’s not unheard of for the Falcons to eschew huddling for an entire half. There have been some rough patches – Jones, in particular, was prone to mental mistakes early on – but the Falcons are finally clear about being a passing team.

By working out of three-receiver sets, Atlanta makes it tougher for defenses to double both White and Jones, as doubling both all but ensures Tony Gonzalez gets matched up on a linebacker:

Gonzalez has made a living feasting on zone defenses with an option route. With an option after Gonzalez gets over the top of a linebacker’s coverage, he runs his route based on how the safety plays. A lot of times the safety’s actions are determined by how he’s reading other receivers’ routes. This illustration shows the concept in its simplest terms. Gonzo and his QB must diagnose the defense the same way. That’s never been a problem for Matt Ryan and the veteran TE.

Also, what people don’t think about is how the three-receiver sets can actually help Atlanta’s power run game. Yes, there are fewer lead-blockers or offensive linemen for Michael Turner to run behind, but if Turner can get to the perimeter, he’s more likely to meet a defensive back than linebacker.

Not many defensive backs can’t tackle the 244-pounder one-on-one. This season Turner rushed for 459 yards on 93 attempts (4.9 average) out of three receiver sets.

The Falcons have not completely abandoned their heavy run game (they constantly used a fullback or extra tight end last week, likely to assure that Tampa Bay’s atrocious middle linebacker, Mason Foster, stayed on the field). If they don’t go no-huddle, they’ll be more inclined to bring in Michael Palmer, Reggie Kelly or Mike Cox, rather than stay exclusively in the three-wide spread.

That said, no-huddle would be an excellent tactic for them Sunday, as it could help quell the Meadowlands crowd and slow down that Giants’ pass-rush.

2. New York’s big nickel package
After rookie nickel corner Prince Amukamara got torched for the umpteenth time in early/mid-December, the Giants reverted back to their “big nickel” defensive package, with Antrel Rolle sliding down to slot corner/outside linebacker and either Deon Grant or Tyler Sash coming in to fill Rolle’s safety spot.

Rolle, whom the Cardinals drafted in the first round as a cornerback out of Miami, has the skills to cover slot receivers, and he also happens to be a superb run-defender. In fact, he’s so good that the Giants often used their “big nickel” package against base offensive personnel last season. Rolle doesn’t just offer solidity against the run; he’s also a shrewd blitzer and help-defender in zone coverage. In short, he’s a poor man’s Charles Woodson.

Obviously, though, if the Giants were overwhelmingly better with Rolle at slot corner, they wouldn’t have moved him back to safety to begin this season. Rolle being in the slot does leave the secondary a bit more vulnerable in downfield coverage. Cornerback Corey Webster’s terrific work in solo coverage ameliorates this somewhat, but Aaron Ross is a bit of a concern on the other side.

3. Atlanta’s approach
If Webster defends Julio Jones, Matt Ryan will look for the mismatch with Roddy White. If Webster defends White, Ryan will look for Jones. The Giants may want to give Ryan one more presnap read to dissect by having Webster alternate between defending Jones and White.

Regardless of where Webster lines up, a big focus of Ryan’s will be on getting the ball out quickly. He’s more inclined to find his rhythm with three-and five-step-drops, just as Tony Romo did in the second half Sunday night (it was a mistake for the Cowboys to not go with this approach earlier in that game).

Matt Ryan will be celebrating if he can get the ball out quickly. (Getty Images)

Even if Ryan’s rhythm is not a concern – and maybe it isn’t; the guy is a cerebral, fundamentally sound passer – Atlanta’s pass protection IS. The Falcons’ front five is a mauling, power-based group that is below the NFL’s athletic median.

It holds up because the five cogs are cohesive and familiar to Ryan. But that isn’t enough when facing a technician like Justin Tuck, a lightning bolt like Osi Umenyiora or a freak like Jason Pierre-Paul.

The only way the Falcons can give Ryan enough time to take a shot downfield is if they go max protect. Thus, when the Falcons do get away from their three-wide personnel, they won’t just be looking to pound the rock – they’ll be looking to go deep. The Giants secondary should be on high alert for play-action.

4. Stopping Eli and the passing game
Cris Collinsworth mentioned early in last Sunday night’s broadcast that Cowboys defensive coordinator Rob Ryan regretted not blitzing Eli Manning more when they met back in Week 14. But in the rematch, Ryan quickly found out that even his most creative blitzes couldn’t faze Manning.

The eighth-year veteran has reached that level where he himself can’t be beat. He simply has too much intelligence, poise and arm strength. Instead, the way to beat Manning is to beat his receivers and hope that leads to Giants mistakes.

Thus, don’t expect the Falcons to do anything more with their pass-rush than the occasional zone blitzes that they’ve used all season. They’re better off focusing on Hakeem Nicks and Victor Cruz. The Redskins discombobulated the Giants in Week 15 by bracketing the top receivers with corners underneath and safeties over the top. Defensive coordinator Jim Haslett was betting that Manning would get impatient and force some balls into those coverages. He was correct.

Stifling the receivers outside is a great approach because it forces Manning to work to his third and fourth reads. He’s more than capable of that….as long as his protection holds up. The Falcons have only a good-but-not-great pass-rush (free agent pickup Ray Edwards has been a disappointment), but it’s a pass-rush that’s capable of exploding at any moment thanks to the supple speed of John Abraham. When Manning’s primary reads are covered, this offense goes from being big-play oriented to dink and dunk. That bodes well for the Falcons (see item 5).

5. Atlanta’s speed
The emergence of Sean Weatherspoon has been huge for Atlanta’s defense. The second-year linebacker is a swift, powerful three-down player who attacks the run and can patrol sideline-to-sideline in underneath coverage. The Falcons have a second player of this ilk in Curtis Lofton, a sound fourth-year pro who lacks Weatherspoon’s elite athletic prowess but compensates with decisive diagnostic skills.

With these two working behind vociferous, quick defensive tackles like Jonathan Babineaux and Corey Peters, it’s not only tough to run on the Falcons, it’s tough to execute screens, dumpoffs and shallow crosses. The intended receiver might catch the pass, but he’s not going far. If he does get away, he still has to get by William Moore and Thomas DeCoud, two of the game’s faster downhill safeties.
 
Overall, this speedy zone defense will be a problem for the Giants, a team that compensated for its bad run game this season by totaling 138 completions to Jake Ballard, Bear Pascoe, Henry Hynoski, D.J. Ware, Ahmad Bradshaw and Brandon Jacobs.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all the wild-card games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Comments
Ada1231
Since: Jan 10, 2012
Posted on: January 30, 2012 3:59 am
This comment has been removed.

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Since: Oct 19, 2006
Posted on: January 8, 2012 12:58 pm
 

Film Room: Giants vs. Falcons wild-card preview

Thanks for all the extra picks!

-The Cleveland Browns



Since: Oct 12, 2006
Posted on: January 8, 2012 12:20 pm
 

Film Room: Giants vs. Falcons wild-card preview

I would take White and Jones over Nicks and Cruz.
With Cruz's numbers this year, he'd be the #1 wr on the Falcons. I really think the big difference in the pass game is whether the TE's have big games. Gonzalez can catch the ball every game, the Giants TE, he drops a lot of them. The running game, I like Turner, but I still give the edge in that to the Giants offensive line and RB's. Defense, slight edge to the Giants too. If both teams show up, this will be a shootout, Matt Ryan & the Falcons are going to need 35+ to beat the Giants. At QB, Eli can win on the last drive, regular season and playoffs. Ryan did in the 13-3 season, but that's regular season and he has yet to win a playoff game. Falcons are defintely due to perform and win their 1st playoff under Matt Ryan era. Do they get it today ?



Since: Oct 25, 2010
Posted on: January 8, 2012 11:47 am
 

Film Room: Giants vs. Falcons wild-card preview

Falcons don't have JPP but they definately have Abraham. lol. I think it comes down to 4th quarter and which QB makes less mistakes.




Since: Jan 5, 2012
Posted on: January 6, 2012 10:22 am
 

Film Room: Giants vs. Falcons wild-card preview

@

It's going to be 45 & sunny!  Weather isn't a concern with me for Matty, he's a Philly boy & played at Boston college as I'm sure you know! 



Since: Aug 31, 2008
Posted on: January 6, 2012 8:52 am
 

Film Room: Giants vs. Falcons wild-card preview

I know what you mean debo9apo1.  I mean, why isn't every article about the NY Giants?  Why do we have to write articles about the other team?  It's not fair!  I only want to read NY Giant articles!!! WAAAHHHHAAAHHHAHHAHAH!!!



Since: Jul 14, 2008
Posted on: January 5, 2012 5:19 pm
 

Film Room: Giants vs. Falcons wild-card preview

I would take White and Jones over Nicks and Cruz. Not just because im a Falcons fan but from a numbers stand point. Cruz and Jones equal out because Cruz has been in the league longer and this is the first year he has done anything and i give the edge to White just from the numbers and not beng injured. We have Abraham who has better numbers then JPP just cause he's been in the league longer. I live in Tampa and watched Paul play at USF and knew he would be a beast. This game i believe will come down to the running game and turnover battle just like most games do. It should be a good one



Since: Aug 24, 2008
Posted on: January 5, 2012 3:46 pm
 

Film Room: Giants vs. Falcons wild-card preview

Are White and Jones anymore explosive then Nicks and Cruz?  I would take Manningham over Douglas but we don't have Tony Gonzalez, but you don't have J.P.P.  I have to give the Gmen a slight edge.



Since: Jul 14, 2008
Posted on: January 5, 2012 2:49 pm
 

Film Room: Giants vs. Falcons wild-card preview

I wasn't born in NYC but i was born in upstate N.Y and i'm a Falcons fan. I wish i could be at the game but its a pretty good trip from Tampa where i live now(and to cold up there). Anyways it should be a pretty close game coming down to turnovers and ball possesion. Weather could play a factor. Im not sure what its supposed to like on Sunday up there.

And to the d-bag with the fashion bull ish on every comment section.... This is sports not fashion take that sh!!!t else where


finghoot
Since: Jan 5, 2012
Posted on: January 5, 2012 2:07 pm
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator



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