Blog Entry

Tebow suffered rib, chest injuries in Pats game

Posted on: January 18, 2012 9:43 am
Edited on: January 18, 2012 11:01 am
 
Tebow suffered some serious injuries against the Pats on Saturday. (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

Tim Tebow, the newly proclaimed starter for Denver's 2012 training camp, is tougher than you all think. The Broncos quarterback played the second half against the Patriots on Saturday after sustaining some pretty severe injuries in Denver's 45-10 loss.

Tebowmania

Broncos spokesman Patrick Smyth didn't detail the exact nature of Tebow's injuries, but did confirm an earlier report from ESPN that Tebow was in considerable pain when he finished Saturday night's game.

Tebow reportedly tore some rib cartilage and bruised his lung but continued to play. this resulted in a a build-up of fluid on his chest (during the game and afterwards).

After Tebow had struggled to sleep on Saturday and Sunday night, he reportedly underwent an MRI on Monday.

The injury occurred when Vince Wilfork and Rob Ninkovich hit Tebow; backup Brady Quinn began to warm up on the sideline following the injury, but Tebow stayed in.

It really shouldn't be a surprise that Tebow eventually suffered an injury: he's one of two NFL players to attempt at least 100 rushes and take at least 30 sacks in the 2011 season (Cam Newton's the other). Tebow also ranked 40th in the NFL in rushing attempts.

These are the sort of things that expose the body to viscous shots from defenders. The irony is that Tebow reportedly suffered the injury after throwing a pass.

Tebow would reportedly be almost doubtful -- and certainly questionable -- to play this Sunday if the Broncos had advanced to the AFC Championship Game. As it is, Tebow is expected to make a full recovery and the injuries are not expected to interfere with his offseason training program.

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Comments

Since: Aug 22, 2006
Posted on: January 22, 2012 7:01 pm
 

Tebow suffered rib, chest injuries in Pats game

Made up stats are made up.  No single Denver receiver was in the top 10 for dropped passes this season.  In order to make it into the top 10, you had to drop 7 passes.  Going into December, the Browns, Eagles, Giants, and Buccaneers were all tied for the league lead in dropped passes with.....23.  Stop using fictitious statistics to back up your opinion.

Going into December

Talk about cherry- picking stats.  What the hell does "going into December" have to do with "going into January" and the playoffs?

I don't know where you get your stats- I watch the games.  There were at least 4 passes good for first downs that clanged off receivers' hands in the Pats/Broncos game.  If a pro receiver gets his hands on a ball, he should catch it.  Whether the Broncos compare as the team who drops the most balls total, I don't care.  The also don't compare as the team that throws the most- not even close.  If you drop 4/20 passes- you're only throwing 20.  As a percentage of the total, that's 20%.  What's hard to understand about that? 

Talk percentages, or talk total yards, or talk productivity, but don't twist stats like that.  We were talking completion percentages.  For a team that only passes twenty times per game, four drops in huge.  For a team like many do these days, that passes fifty times, four drops is insignificant. 

Another knock on Tebow is three and outs.  Well, four dropped passes that end drives and gives N.E. the ball, resulting in momentum and points is also huge. 

Did I watch all the Bronos games- yes.  And I criticized the play calling as many Broncos fans did as too predictable.  Run on first, run of second, and throw on third and long is a prescription for failure.  Third down conversions for third and long are 20-30% in the NFL- about what Tebows were, when forced to pass in those situations- frequently.  Third and short is more manageable.  So, what was the difference in the Steelers' game?  They were throwing on first and second down- surely this isn't too complex for you to grasp? 


That stat doesn't tell you jack.  I could throw 5 passes, complete 1 for 100 yards, 4 for interceptions, and my yards per completion would be 100.  Stupid stats are stupid.   Yards per attempt is used and Tebow's 6.4 was good enough for 29th out of 34 qualifiers.  And all it really tells you is if that player has big play ability. 


Thanks for your stupid stats.  What I was referring to was the play selection which was not Tebow's but McCoy's.  The Bronco tendency has been to run 2/3 of the time, and to throw long- often on third and long when the defenses are in prevent and rushing.  Despite that, his completions were long and significant enough to win seven games in twelve starts.  A per pass completion average over 30 yards is significant, particularly when totalling over 200 yards against the league's #1 defense. 

If you had to choose a 50% completion percentage, or over 200 yards and several scoring drives, or a 6 yard per completion, and 20 compeltions, for 120 yards, and dink and dunk coma, anybody but an idiot would take the big plays.  Of course, it would be better if the play calling was more diverse, but that is not the QBs prerogative.  As for not bompleting deep out patterns, that's just ignorant.  Tim does that very well.  Everybody in Denver well knows that he has been instructed to throw the ball away by giving it grass burns of the plays not there.  The rationale is to limit turnovers.  It has worked very well for the most part. 

Tim has a very good completion to interception ratio.  Some of your pass happy hotshots have nearly as many picks as TDs.   




Since: Nov 12, 2006
Posted on: January 20, 2012 9:48 pm
 

Tebow suffered rib, chest injuries in Pats game

Those numbers don't say much at all for Tebow, considering the mark of a quarterback's arm strength has long been the out pattern.  If he's missing the quick out, that's a mechanical flaw (footwork) that should have been worked out this far into his career.

All quarterbacks throw a lot of passes away, but I do give Tebow credit for limiting his turnovers in general throughout the year.  It helps that his team retrieved an enormous percentage of his many fumbles, but in general he did do a good job of not forcing it.  That goes along with the one and done mentality though.  He reads one receiver and if he isn't open, tends to try to do something with his feet.  Sometimes he'll throw a pass away, but it seems like his mentality goes "Receiver, feet, incomplete" and where he needs to get to is "receiver, receiver, receiver, feet, incomplete".



Since: Sep 15, 2009
Posted on: January 20, 2012 6:37 pm
 

Tebow suffered rib, chest injuries in Pats game

Here's a breakdown of Tebow's passes this year in the regular season.

left sideline
36-89, 527 yards 40.4% 2 TD 2 INT

Left Side
27-47, 393 yards 57.4% 2 TD 1 INT

Middle
21-32, 244 yards 65.6% 2 TD 0 INT

Right side
15-25, 134 yards 60.0% 3 TDs 1 INT

Right Sideline
27-78, 431 yards 34.6% 3 TD 2 INT

He really struggled with the quick out to the sideline. Those passes were often in the dirt or too high.

I also know a lot of those sideline misses were balls he threw away. He did a good job for a young QB to throw it away many times. 





Since: Sep 15, 2009
Posted on: January 20, 2012 6:31 pm
 

Tebow suffered rib, chest injuries in Pats game

Here's a breakdown of Tebow's passes this year in the regular season.

left sideline
36-89, 527 yards 40.4% 2 TD 2 INT

Left Side
27-47, 393 yards 57.4% 2 TD 1 INT

Middle
21-32, 244 yards 65.6% 2 TD 0 INT

Right side
15-25, 134 yards 60.0% 3 TDs 1 INT

Right Sideline
27-78, 431 yards 34.6% 3 TD 2 INT


Very accurate except on sideline passes which some have been very long attempts. Tebow attempted more passes of 25+ yards percentage-wise than any other QB in the league.



Since: Nov 12, 2006
Posted on: January 20, 2012 6:20 pm
 

Tebow suffered rib, chest injuries in Pats game

No improvement? Did none of you critics watch the Steelers' game?
Yes, I saw it.  And I saw the same Tebow I see in every other game.  I think you saw what you wanted to see and are blissfully happy to ignore the entire season's "progress".  I saw a few nice throws in that game, but none that required anything more than chucking it to the number one option.  I saw him miss a wide-open receiver that likely would have ended the game in regulation.   No defender between him and the receiver, the receiver running open, and no pressure on Tebow.  Just missed him by more than 5 yards.  It was the same pass in the other direction that Thomas caught and ran 70 yards with.  Ever notice how those YAC makes a qb's YPC look better?  Fortunately for Denver, Troy Polamalu takes himself out of position so often it left their backup safety trying to make up for it all day.  Polamalu reminds of Junior Seau in the late stages of his Chargers career - gambling constantly, still making some big plays that made fans and sportscasters go "oooh", but hurting his team with increasing frequency. 

But it's funny how you ignore that he was a turnover machine during the losing streak, that he's 1-4 in his last 5 starts, that he is a grossly inaccurate passer, and that he cannot move through progressions. 



Since: Aug 16, 2006
Posted on: January 20, 2012 5:27 pm
 

Tebow suffered rib, chest injuries in Pats game

there were at least 4 first down catches per game that clanked off the receivers' hands.
Made up stats are made up.  No single Denver receiver was in the top 10 for dropped passes this season.  In order to make it into the top 10, you had to drop 7 passes.  Going into December, the Browns, Eagles, Giants, and Buccaneers were all tied for the league lead in dropped passes with.....23.  Stop using fictitious statistics to back up your opinion.

Did none of you critics watch the Steelers' game?
Did you watch either Pats game, or the Bills game, or the Chiefs game?  Obviously not.  Good job at cherry picking 1 game out of 5 where he performed well.

Tim's yards per completion despite the completion percentages was near the top of the league- something lamebrain critics refuse to see. 
That stat doesn't tell you jack.  I could throw 5 passes, complete 1 for 100 yards, 4 for interceptions, and my yards per completion would be 100.  Stupid stats are stupid.   Yards per attempt is used and Tebow's 6.4 was good enough for 29th out of 34 qualifiers.  And all it really tells you is if that player has big play ability. 



Since: Aug 22, 2006
Posted on: January 20, 2012 4:16 pm
 

Tebow suffered rib, chest injuries in Pats game

Tebow was the guy people wanted to see, so that's who we got.  Personally, I'm not a fan and would like to see a different QB starting for us, but I'm going to have to wait.Here's the thing.  Tebow is likely going to get one more year, maybe less.  If he can't learn to complete better than 50% of his passes, he'll probably be replaced.




Yeah, you can talk about the compeltion percentages, but how many drops per game did the WRs have?  there were at least 4 first down catches per game that clanked off the receivers' hands.  Now, it doesn't take a mathmetician to figure that 4/20 equates to about 20% of your passes.  If you're throwing 40% and you add 20%, what's that yield.  Right- NFL average.  Morons who want to harp on Tebow should at least be honest enough to look at that glaring fact.  The guy throws a clunker and the whole world goes apoplectic.  Any other QB does it, and it's no big deal, because he's going to throw 50 times a game. 

Everybody drools over Scam Newton, but he's allowed to do what he does, the OC calls plays that feature him passing, and he gets stats.  He also throws more picks, and his share of duds, but hey, he gets a pass.  And, he's sitting at home during the playoffs. 

I don't disagree with the Broncos throwing a third of the time, and running two thirds of the time.  It's what they do best- better than the rest of the league statistically.  With the young offensive line we got, that's not going to change.  Maybe they can draft a power back to follow McGahee when he wears out.  They also need to address the need for a consistent veteran WR to complement the young, talented WRs they have who are inconsistent (one that isn't a clubhouse cancer).  What will happen is that they will probably go with less max protect and get more of a short passing game going, which will easily increase completion percentages and allow fewer three and outs than always running on first and second down and throwing deep on third.  Tim's yards per completion despite the completion percentages was near the top of the league- something lamebrain critics refuse to see. 

No improvement?  Did none of you critics watch the Steelers' game?  He looked off safeties, threw backshoulder, threw several passes in the air beyond thirty yards on the money.  His per pass yardage was over thirty, and his QB rating was 125.  Those weren't dink and dunk passes most of the league favors and YAC, but deep ball, beautifully thrown.  Who cares if they wobble or spiral- they were on time and in the right location.  Style points are for losers. 




Since: Aug 16, 2006
Posted on: January 20, 2012 3:16 pm
 

Tebow suffered rib, chest injuries in Pats game

I'm not trying to be mean spirited towards Tebow, but many NFL quarterbacks have been given up on as possible starters in the league for needing less work than Tebow requires. Teams want NFL ready quarterbacks. I can't recall a team every putting this much work into making a player capable of playing in the league.
The problem isn't Tebow as opposed to what McDaniels gave up to draft him, the spot where he was drafted, and the clamor from the wacko Tebow fanatics for him to start.  Tebow was always considered a project, but when you draft a QB in the 1st round, unless you're preparing for the future (GB and Rodgers), that QB is expected to take over some time soon.  If Tebow had been drafted in the 3rd or 4th round, he'd likely still be learning and sitting on the bench, but it didn't work out like that.  Orton was ineffective with an offense that wasn't effective for him and he needed to be replaced.  Tebow was the guy people wanted to see, so that's who we got.  Personally, I'm not a fan and would like to see a different QB starting for us, but I'm going to have to wait.

Here's the thing.  Tebow is likely going to get one more year, maybe less.  If he can't learn to complete better than 50% of his passes, he'll probably be replaced.



Since: Aug 16, 2006
Posted on: January 20, 2012 3:02 pm
 

Tebow suffered rib, chest injuries in Pats game

Heismans mean exactly squat.  They're part of a publicity contest usually won by the university with the most aggressive PR department and the timing of a couple of hot games at the right time.  Look up Heisman trophy winnes in the last 20 years and think about how many were actually the best player in the country that year.
That wasn't the point I was getting at.  Cuda said that Tebow's resume was no different than any other 1st round QBs resume heading into the draft and I was saying that it was MUCH different.  Most 1st round QBs don't have Heismans and National Championships.  It wasn't a barometer of Tebow's future as an NFL QB.



Since: Nov 12, 2006
Posted on: January 20, 2012 1:20 pm
 

Tebow suffered rib, chest injuries in Pats game

Warnertoholt, you can't really be as big an idiot as you pretend to be.  TRY to think in context.  Heismans mean exactly squat when morons hold them up as some indicator of a player's NFL prospects.  Get real.  National champions mean the same - in context.  Get your head out of your butt and stop being such a clown.  Your argument is like that of a six year old.

No, the Broncos were not contenders.  Just like the Seahawks were not contenders when they beat the Saints last year.  They had no chance of winning.  Not enough talent.  But it that "sounds like a contender" to you, there's no helping you.

What progress did you personally see Tebow make?  Did he go through progressions?  Did he recognize defenses and audible out when necessary?  Of course not.  No progress.


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