Play Fantasy The Most Award Winning Fantasy game with real time scoring, top expert analysis, custom settings, and more. Play Now
Blog Entry

Crisis averted: NFLPA gives Smith his bonus

Posted on: December 21, 2011 2:12 pm
 
The NFLPA executive committee voted to give DeMaurice Smith his $1 million bonus.

"The Executive Committee of the NFLPA stands firmly united behind Executive Director DeMaurice Smith and what has been accomplished under his leadership," read an NFLPA statement obtained by me. "Today, we made an affirmative decision on his discretionary compensation. We look forward to having him serve our membership long into the future."

There was some concern among some NFLPA leaders that Smith might not receive the bonus and he could depart.

But that is no longer the case. Smith is now the leader of the union for the long haul.

Category: NFL
Tags: NFL, NFLPA
 
Comments

Since: Aug 23, 2010
Posted on: December 22, 2011 12:53 pm
 

Crisis averted: NFLPA gives Smith his bonus

Bottom line is Smith got an agreement done.  After dividing up over 900m between 2 parties a 1m bounus should not be an issue.Cool



Since: Nov 19, 2010
Posted on: December 22, 2011 2:00 am
 

Crisis averted: NFLPA gives Smith his bonus

Had to log in for first time in few years, since I've always accepted that this site is for humor and bad opinions, but right now Freeman is really annoying me. Prisco and Freeman are not what you call talented reporters or journalists or whatever, but having to endure Freemans non-stories about Smiths bonus and the HGH is just a waste of time. Seems to me that Freeman was trying to make a claim to be "first to report" by using his "sources" (magic 8-ball anyone?). Freeman should stick to racist comments and completely off-the-wall opinions and leave the scoops for guys who can get them, like Schefter (not sure about the spelling, being from non-english speaking country) and King. So come on Mike, nice try, but once we get to postseason, time to step up your game and just go with what you do best, opinions that are based on nothing and get people riled up.



Since: Sep 25, 2009
Posted on: December 22, 2011 1:00 am
 

Crisis averted: NFLPA gives Smith his bonus

It's about time.  Sadly, though, the cynical part of me can't help but think that the players found a way to steal the money from NFLPA alumni who need it.  The players really don't deserve more than about 20 percent.  Most businesses find even thirty percent of revenue to be an unacceptable labor cost, and twenty percent is a reasonable starting point target for most buisnesses.  
 
When most of the people who buy tickets to NFL games and support the sponsors are being paid less than thirty percent of the revenue their companies generate, why do players think they are entitied to fifty percent or more?  I don't even bother to watch or attend nearly as many professional sports events as I used to, becuase I feel a major disconnect between players and their fanbases. 
The NFL doesn't produce and sell widgets. They sell entertainment. The players are the product and thus they are the research and development, the "production" and "manufacturing" cost.  It's the same as any service that doesn't actually sell you a product.

When you hire a plumber or a contractor or a mechanic they generally set out a "labor" cost.  For contractors you have to buy the materials for them, and then they just build whatever it is.  They all take pretty much the entire labor cost as profits.

I assume you also don't watch TV or movies, listen to music or even read books. Actors, singers and writers all make more money than the average person that watches them/reads them. They, and the producters, all also take more than 20%.



Since: Dec 1, 2009
Posted on: December 21, 2011 4:39 pm
 

Crisis averted: NFLPA gives Smith his bonus

"... the cynical part of me can't help but think that the players found a way to steal the money from NFLPA alumni who need it."  --Teres Minor

There are OTHER parts of you? No evidence here.

"The players really don't deserve more than about 20 percent.  Most businesses find even thirty percent of revenue to be an unacceptable labor cost, and twenty percent is a reasonable starting point target for most buisnesses."  --Teres Minor

Most businesses pay almost every last one of their employees as little as they think (hope) they can get away with. I'm thinking one of the differences between most people and professional athletes is that they AREN'T "most people." Just as the Lords of the Universe who nearly brought down the world economy aren't most people. You might want to check the percentage of THAT industry's revenues that go to its employees. I'm guessing it's on the order of 70%-80%, MINIMUM. Personally, MY bile is reserved for the clowns on Wall Street who SHOULD be swinging from lamp posts, every one, rather than for guys who provide me quality entertainment, most of them at the cost of years of debilitating pain, sometimes severely limited mobility, and sometimes premature dementia or death or both.

"...most of the people who buy tickets to NFL games and support the sponsors are being paid less than thirty percent of the revenue their companies generate..."  --Teres Minor

Other than flea-bitten envy, what could possibly motivate you to give a rat's *ss, one way or the other, how another man is compensated? Honestly, I'm genuinely curious as to whether there might be some other explanation. Now, some might take your opportunity to blather about "social justice," but I'd wager that you're a either a mid-level corporate manager or a small businessman, given some of the things at which your missive hints, so you're unlikely to be a fan of John Rawls. Please, enlighten me, if there is, in fact, something not ignoble at the root of your discontent. (Perhaps it might even offer useful insight into the legions of malcontents on the internet (and talk radio) who so brighten our days with their dyspepsia.)




Since: Jun 22, 2009
Posted on: December 21, 2011 4:39 pm
 

Crisis averted: NFLPA gives Smith his bonus

Teres Minor, characterizing the NFLPA as "stealing" money from NFL alumni is a little over the top.  The alumni never had it, so how can it be stealing?  I do hope that someday the current players decide to throw these old guys a bone, but that's exactly what it would be, a gift, and therein lies the problem.  These ex-players don't see it as a gift.  They see it as a birthright.  While we look back today on what players in the 70s and 80s made at the time, it appears small, but I'm sure it was quite lucrative by standards of those time.  Hence, my dad was an electrical engineer during that time and earned a nice middle class living, but I'm sure it wasn't anywhere near the same realm as what NFL players earned.  So, they should have invested their money, but evidently many didn't.  That's fine, that's their prerogative, but they shouldn't come poor mouthing now.  For those guys to act like they knew nothing about the risks that come with the game is absolute nonsense.  Guys were playing the game decades before that, with leather helmets, no less.  One can only imagine that the rate of concussion-related problems was a lot higher then than it is now, and players of the 70s and 80s should have been and probably in most cases were aware of it.  Whatever the players and owners decide to give these players is more than they rightfully have coming, so if it eventually happens, I hope it is met with appreciation and not a begrudging, self-righteous attitude.



Since: Dec 1, 2009
Posted on: December 21, 2011 4:38 pm
 

Crisis averted: NFLPA gives Smith his bonus

"... the cynical part of me can't help but think that the players found a way to steal the money from NFLPA alumni who need it."  --Teres Minor

There are OTHER parts of you? No evidence here.

"The players really don't deserve more than about 20 percent.  Most businesses find even thirty percent of revenue to be an unacceptable labor cost, and twenty percent is a reasonable starting point target for most buisnesses."  --Teres Minor

Most businesses pay almost every last one of their employees as little as they think (hope) they can get away with. I'm thinking one of the differences between most people and professional athletes is that they AREN'T "most people." Just as the Lords of the Universe who nearly brought down the world economy aren't most people. You might want to check the percentage of THAT industry's revenues that go to its employees. I'm guessing it's on the order of 70%-80%, MINIMUM. Personally, MY bile is reserved for the clowns on Wall Street who SHOULD be swinging from lamp posts, every one, rather than for guys who provide me quality entertainment, most of them at the cost of years of debilitating pain, sometimes severely limited mobility, and sometimes premature dementia or death or both.

"...most of the people who buy tickets to NFL games and support the sponsors are being paid less than thirty percent of the revenue their companies generate..."  --Teres Minor

Other than flea-bitten envy, what could possibly motivate you to give a rat's *ss, one way or the other, how another man is compensated? Honestly, I'm genuinely curious as to whether there might be some other explanation. Now, some might take your opportunity to blather about "social justice," but I'd wager that you're a either a mid-level corporate manager or a small businessman, given some of the things at which your missive hints, so you're unlikely to be a fan of John Rawls. Please, enlighten me, if there is, in fact, something not ignoble at the root of your discontent. (Perhaps it might even offer useful insight into the legions of malcontents on the internet (and talk radio) who so brighten our days with their dyspepsia.)




Since: Jun 5, 2011
Posted on: December 21, 2011 2:52 pm
 

Crisis averted: NFLPA gives Smith his bonus

It's about time.  Sadly, though, the cynical part of me can't help but think that the players found a way to steal the money from NFLPA alumni who need it.  The players really don't deserve more than about 20 percent.  Most businesses find even thirty percent of revenue to be an unacceptable labor cost, and twenty percent is a reasonable starting point target for most buisnesses.  
 
When most of the people who buy tickets to NFL games and support the sponsors are being paid less than thirty percent of the revenue their companies generate, why do players think they are entitied to fifty percent or more?  I don't even bother to watch or attend nearly as many professional sports events as I used to, becuase I feel a major disconnect between players and their fanbases.  
 
I'll watch and attend a lot of college and high school sports, though.  I do go to some MLB games because there are usually tickets for under $20, and sometimes as low as $12, but I don't bother wasting over $50-$90 to watch a mediocre NFL team go through the motions and run the same offense as the other team.  As for the NBA, puh-leeze.  Whatever the reason, the games just aren't fun anymore.  


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com