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Sean Payton book sheds light on bounty scandal

Posted on: March 3, 2012 9:20 am
 

Sean Payton, coach of the New Orleans Saints and now in the middle of one of the biggest scandals in NFL history, wrote a book several years ago called "Home Team." Nothing special about it. Not all that good. It details Payton's rise in the NFL and how the Saints won the Super Bowl. Now, in light of this scandal, the book has become extremely important.

Mainly because it does three things. One, it shows just how extensive a control freak Payton is. So any type of defense that he didn't know simply won't fly. Payton is one of the most detail-oriented coaches in the sport. Second, several passages of the book demonstrate Payton doesn't really give a damn about NFL rules. Now, that's not unusual for a head coach but again, with the bounty investigation, that notion takes on an entirely new meaning.

Third, and most important, it goes into extensive detail about Payton's relationship with one of the central and most shadowy figures from this scandal and that's felon Mike Ornstein who is a close friend of Payton's and, according to NFL documents, himself contributed cash to the bounty pool.

One of the more relevant passages starts on page 231. It describes how Payton had Ornstein handle a lot of the Super Bowl preparation. It reads: “I had Mike Ornstein running special ops. Mike had no official title with the Saints. His name appeared nowhere on the team payroll or organizational chart. But he played an absolutely crucial role in the Saints’ Super Bowl victory, and hardly anybody knows what he did…More than anyone else I know, he understands how to get things done in the pro-sports world. He also has a taste for mischief…Now he was a close friend of mine and a great asset to the team, flying into Miami and softening up the off-field for us.”

He has a taste for mischief. I'll say. Ornstein was convicted of felony fraud.

Later, on page 233: "We agreed: If we were going to Miami, Ornstein would oversee the nongame logistics. Room assignments. Travel plans. How many tickets Reggie’s family might need. If you think issues like those can’t erupt into major catastrophes, you’ve never been involved in planning a Super Bowl. At any moment, a thousand things can go wrong. Much as I admired the skill and dedication of the in-house Saints staff, no one on Airline Drive had ever been through something of this magnitude.  ‘I’m telling you right now, you’re in charge,’ I said to Mike even before the play-offs began. ‘Work with our people. But if there’s something you want to do that they don’t want to do, you tell me.’ I don’t know all the details of what Mike Ornstein did. But I do know the players and their families were extremely well taken care of. I know the stupid distractions were kept to an absolute minimum. I know we dreamed up a bunch of little irritations to get under the skin of the Colts. And there was Ornstein with a tiny smile on his face."

Page 235: "Every detail from that moment forward was designed to make a point.  When each player got up to his room, there was more in there than free stationery and little bottles of shampoo. There was a Sony video camera. There were gift cards from Morton’s steakhouse, Subway sandwich shops and Cold Stone Creamery. There was a giant basket filled with candy, popcorn and a week’s supply of Title Sports Drinks. This might all sound minor in the hugeness of the Super Bowl. It was not…and every day, extravagant freebies kept showing up in the rooms…I don’t know exactly where all this stuff came from. Some I know we bought at a discount. Other stuff was donated by companies that wanted to be friendly—or were eager for good PR. We might have traded some tickets with Reebok…It was amazing how much difference these little touches made."

Payton also describes how he instructed Ornstein to break NFL rules by sneaking champagne into the locker room. "I'm ready to pay the fine," Payton said then.

None of this is a huge deal but it illustrates that close Payton and Ornstein relationship that has become a critical part of the NFL's investigation.



Category: NFL
Tags: Saints
 
Comments

Since: Jan 22, 2010
Posted on: March 11, 2012 5:00 pm
 

Sean Payton book sheds light on bounty scandal

So just who is this snitch anyway? Innocent



Since: Dec 5, 2006
Posted on: March 8, 2012 10:01 pm
 

Sean Payton book sheds light on bounty scandal

I think EVERYONE needs to stop and take a deep breath. Before we have players, coaches and teams castrated we should await the total facts.  Yes I am an avid Saints fan and aseason ticket holder since day 1 in 1967. I never wore a bag on my head and never will.Were things handled wrong when Mr Benson passed the word to have the process stopped and it wasn't is horrible.  I also know from reliable source that the parting of Gregg Williams was mutual and the Saints had decided in the second half of the season. It also appears that they let it go "since he was leaving a down. anyway".  That does not excuse behavior - not by a long shot.  Mickey and Sean have done wonders to build this team.  I hope against hope it isn't torn.  The Saints, as many articles state, were the unlucky ones that got turned in by an angry ex-emplyee or ex-player.  Frown




Since: Mar 8, 2012
Posted on: March 8, 2012 1:30 pm
 

Sean Payton book sheds light on bounty scandal

Please wait to see all the facts...Thank you!



Since: Oct 13, 2007
Posted on: March 8, 2012 11:17 am
 

Sean Payton book sheds light on bounty scandal

 One, it shows just how extensive a control freak Payton is. So any type of defense that he didn't know simply won't fly. Payton is one of the most detail-oriented coaches in the sport.

Second, several passages of the book demonstrate Payton doesn't really give a damn about NFL rules. Now, that's not unusual for a head coach but again, with the bounty investigation, that notion takes on an entirely new meaning.


Third, and most important, it goes into extensive detail about Payton's relationship with one of the central and most shadowy figures from this scandal and that's felon Mike Ornstein who is a close friend of Payton's and, according to NFL documents, himself contributed cash to the bounty pool.

I read "Home team" and find this part interesting, as I never connected any of this the way Freeman is.  #1 above, I agree but never got the feeling from the book that it was a mean spirited control freak issue...

#2 - he doesn't give a damn about the NFL rules?  Wow, that's a biggie ... I would say that if anything could be something for Goddell to investigate further.  Overall Payton has seemed like a nice enough guy...

#3 -- that was pretty funny stuff with the Ornstein angle. Some might say it worked out but still, all the pregame Super Bowl week riff raff could go either way.  THe Raiders in XV, 1981, were all about late nights and no curfew and still won for example. 





Since: Sep 11, 2006
Posted on: March 6, 2012 7:46 am
 

Sean Payton book sheds light on bounty scandal

 I read somewhere earlier this week what a class organization the Saints are. Well this article and others are showing me what a group of losers this organization really is. This team has taken thuggery in the NFL to a new and criminal level. I truly hope the league pounds this team back to the stone ages. Here come Da 'Aints. It was a good story about a city ravaged by disaster and their football team leading them from the gates of hell to the Super Bowl but the way they did it is very uncool. Hey, people of New Orleans is this really how you want to be known? You folks need to stand up and let this organization know that it is not ok to run a football team this way. But I guess that is too much to ask from todays society.



Since: Aug 30, 2007
Posted on: March 5, 2012 9:07 pm
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator




Since: Jul 21, 2007
Posted on: March 5, 2012 8:35 pm
 

Sean Payton book sheds light on bounty scandal

Football is a brutal enough sport. As an example consider Hershel Walker and his circumstances now with what could probably be attributed to brain damage. Consider that for the longest time the NFL not only allowed, but probably encouraged players to "stick their hats" into a ball carrier, and it's no surprise some former players' health is so bad.

I wonder what would become of the game if you took these helmets and pads off these guys and revert to a game closer to rugby? Sure there would be injuries, but would any guy in his right mind lead with his head on a tackle.

Course I say all this just to state the obvious. The above points are within the guidelines of acceptable contact. Bounties on the other hand are sickening to consider. One of the most infamous hits I recall was LT taking out Joe Theismann when the QB's leg seemingly added a third joint breaking in a place that was completely, and hideously not right. The hit was clean and brutal, as far as I know. But what if LT got $25,000 for taking Theismann out of the game? Suddenly my respect for LT would plummet even further than his story that the teenage prostitute fiasco.

I hope the NFL puts an end to bounties forever, and that, if necessary, offensive players go on strike until this is banned from the game along with the most severe penalties to discourage defensive players and coaches from crossing the line.


D.WhoDatNation
Since: Nov 2, 2011
Posted on: March 5, 2012 8:33 pm
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator




Since: May 5, 2011
Posted on: March 5, 2012 8:20 pm
 

Sean Payton book sheds light on bounty scandal

A lifetime ban seems appropriate.  Anything less by Goodell is pure cowardness. 


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