Blog Entry

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Posted on: December 6, 2011 5:32 pm
Edited on: December 7, 2011 10:03 am
 

Start with the fact the Big East has BCS membership only because of a hall pass.

The BCS commissioners awarded the conference a waiver to stay in the club in 2007 just, well, because. Back then, the Big East still had enough existing juice from its teams and power from its administrators to keep its nose under the BCS tent.

No more.

You don’t have to be told that the Big East hasn’t had a team ranked in the final BCS top 20 since 2009. Or had one team in the top 10 of the BCS since 2008. (The Big Ten has had seven.) Such things matter when a conference is being awarded an $18 million-$20 million bowl game each year just, because.

That’s why you may have noticed the Big East is expanding, to chase that magic BCS berth like it was a contact high. CBSSports.com’s Brett McMurphy reported Tuesday that Boise State, San Diego State, Houston, SMU and Central Florida will join the league in 2013.

The problem is no one really knows what it all means. Four of the five new schools are basically warm bodies to keep the Big East afloat. The league is hoping the fifth, Boise, can keep the conference in the BCS big time. Air Force and Navy may join later.

But there’s no certainty the BCS is even going to be around in a few years. Commissioners will spend most of the next year deciding what college football’s postseason will look like beginning in 2014 (when the current BCS contract expires). The question – now that there is a bit of clarity regarding Big East membership – is if the league is better off with this current expansion.

Short answer: No. Not even close. The schools that have left – West Virginia, Syracuse and Pittsburgh – have accounted for five BCS bowls in the 14-year history of the system. That’s more than twice as many as the new schools bring to the table, all of them by Boise State (two).

But what choice did the Big East have? After the latest ACC raid, it just needed a heartbeat.

Here is  breakdown between the old and new. Decide for yourself if the Big East is worthy of a BCS bid.

(Note: We are considering the “highest level of football” since 1973 when Division I was established by the NCAA. Boise State moved up to Division I-A in 1996. All ranking references are to the Associated Press and BCS.)

 

Boise State

Conference: Mountain West, first year

Age of program at highest level of college football: 16th year in Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Broncos ended the season ranked (1998-present): Seven

The last year the Broncos ended the season ranked: 2011

BCS bowls: two (2007 Fiesta, 2010 Fiesta)

 

San Diego State

Conference: Mountain West, 13th year

Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Aztecs ended the season ranked: None.

The last year the Aztecs ended the season ranked: 1977

BCS bowls: None.

 

Houston

Conference: Conference USA, 16th year

Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Cougars ended the season ranked: One (2011)

The last year the Cougars ended the season ranked: 1990

BCS bowls: None



SMU

Conference: Conference USA, sixth year
 
Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Mustangs ended the season ranked: None.

The last year the Mustangs ended ranked: 1984

BCS bowls: None.

  

Central Florida

Conference: Conference USA, sixth year  

Age of program at highest level: 16th year in Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era the Knights ended the season ranked: One (2010)

The last year the Knights ended ranked: 2010.

BCS bowls: None.

 

The skinny on new teams

Average stay in current conference: 8.4 years

Average age of new programs at highest level of football: 29.8 years

Total seasons in the BCS era that ended with a ranking: Nine (average of 1.8 times per school)

Average length of time, in years, since last end-of-season ranking: 16.4 years

Last season ranked at the end of the season: Boise, 2011

Total BCS bowls: Two.

 

The skinny on departing teams (West Virginia, Pittsburgh, Syracuse)

Average stay in current conference: 20 years (Each year was a charter member in football.)

Average age of programs playing at the highest level of football: 39

Total seasons in the BCS era that ended with a ranking: 12 (average of four times per school)

Average length of time, in years, since last end-of-season ranking: four

Last season ranked at end of the season: 2011 (West Virginia)

Total BCS bowls: 5


Comments

Since: Mar 15, 2008
Posted on: December 8, 2011 6:57 am
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

though the BE's record in BCS games is certainly respectable.


even thats not real...the BE has a respectable BCS game record for only ONE reason. They always play in the Orange Bowl,every single year, against the other non deserving league ....the ACC

comparing that game to the other BCS games is always apples to oranges 



Since: Mar 15, 2008
Posted on: December 8, 2011 6:51 am
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Dodd is such a hack.....yes, the old Big East teams have more BCS bids.....BECAUSE they got an automatic one .  

In the corrupt world of the BCS the old teams may have had a more political juice and ESPN operating as their alumni association BUT there is no comparision in the actual talent levels of the teams. The new teams are much stronger in actual football quality....not even close.   



Since: Sep 5, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 10:13 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Avergae BCS Ranking of teams leaving BE: 54.66


Average BCS ranking of teams joing BE:  44. 8  


Good point that its not even close Dodd.  



Since: Sep 5, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 10:07 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Its called TV markets.  TV has taken a strangle hold on college football.  Stadium capacities matter a lot less than TV markets... if the product on the field is good.



Since: Sep 5, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 10:02 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Dodd,

Why not add the current BCS ranking of the teams leaving and the teams staying.  BSU far outpaces WVU.  Pitt is 6-6 and SU hasn't had back to back winning seasons in 10+ years.  That's really not a lot of football success walking out the door.  On the contrary, BSU, HU, and  SMU are all top 25 teams.  UCF finished in the top 25 last season and SDS has put together at least back to back good seasons.


On the pages of cbssportsline, idiot writers may say it is "not even close" but even in an average of sportslines' own ranking, the BE product on the field has improved.    &n
bsp;



Since: Sep 5, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 9:56 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

To say it was awarded in 2007 "just because" is a stupid statement.  Three teams in the BE finished in the top 15 in 2006.  The conference has slowly gone downhill since then, though the BE's record in BCS games is certainly respectable.



Since: Dec 17, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 7:10 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

I just wonder why dodd had to go and lump WVU in with Pitt and Syracuse so we could make them look better on his stupid little stat sheet.



Since: Nov 19, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 5:29 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

This entire deals falls apart if the Big 12 finally wakes up and grabs both Louisville and Cincinnati, going back to a 12 team Conference with two divisions and a Conference Championship game.  The good news for the Big East is that Texas does not want this, and the Big !2 is nothing more than a slave to the whims of Texas.  If The big East is smart, they get this deal done NOW, settle with Pitt, Syracuse, and West Virginia, and start playing as soon as possible, i.e. 2012. 



Since: Sep 1, 2011
Posted on: December 7, 2011 5:24 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Syracuse and Pitt will follow the path to complete obscurity that Boston College has since they joined the ACC, although Cuse has a shot at staying strong in hoops because of Boeheim.  Miami and Va Tech were late arrivals that used the Big East to gain promenance, then turned their back at the first opportunity.  Only VT has done anything in the ACC.

Bottom line is that BC, Pitt and Syracuse CREATED the Big East Football Conference but failed to provide the strength and leadership to make the Conference grow.  BC was of course the first coward to go running for greener pastures, spitting in the face of it's long time partners, although Cuse tried to be the first out the door.

Pitt ad Cuse are mediocre football programs that will get lost in the monstrosity that is a 14 team Conference.  This will all blow up again in a few years and the stupidity, greed and short-sightedness that has overtaken colleg sports will all blow up in everyone;s faces.





Since: Sep 21, 2011
Posted on: December 7, 2011 5:03 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Dodd, what got your panties in a bunch?


By all accounts BSU should have gone to the BCS at least 2 more times.  That, using your logic, would make it 5 to 4.  You did not look at the direction of the schools in question.  If you looked at the history of the schools, which is where your based your assesment SMU by its self beats the entire Old BigEast.   I don't think this is a great deal, by far.  You know the big east was in trouble before the three teams bolted.  


In reality this move will be a place holder for BE football until the musical leagues is done  (my guess 5 to 10 years- when most of the TV contracts end or start work on new ones).  At that time Boise, SanDiego and maybe the Texas schools will start a new league, move to the Mountain West or WAC.     &
nbsp; 


You know that is what is going on.   It is time to unbunch your panties and move on.
 


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