Blog Entry

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Posted on: December 6, 2011 5:32 pm
Edited on: December 7, 2011 10:03 am
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Start with the fact the Big East has BCS membership only because of a hall pass.

The BCS commissioners awarded the conference a waiver to stay in the club in 2007 just, well, because. Back then, the Big East still had enough existing juice from its teams and power from its administrators to keep its nose under the BCS tent.

No more.

You don’t have to be told that the Big East hasn’t had a team ranked in the final BCS top 20 since 2009. Or had one team in the top 10 of the BCS since 2008. (The Big Ten has had seven.) Such things matter when a conference is being awarded an $18 million-$20 million bowl game each year just, because.

That’s why you may have noticed the Big East is expanding, to chase that magic BCS berth like it was a contact high. CBSSports.com’s Brett McMurphy reported Tuesday that Boise State, San Diego State, Houston, SMU and Central Florida will join the league in 2013.

The problem is no one really knows what it all means. Four of the five new schools are basically warm bodies to keep the Big East afloat. The league is hoping the fifth, Boise, can keep the conference in the BCS big time. Air Force and Navy may join later.

But there’s no certainty the BCS is even going to be around in a few years. Commissioners will spend most of the next year deciding what college football’s postseason will look like beginning in 2014 (when the current BCS contract expires). The question – now that there is a bit of clarity regarding Big East membership – is if the league is better off with this current expansion.

Short answer: No. Not even close. The schools that have left – West Virginia, Syracuse and Pittsburgh – have accounted for five BCS bowls in the 14-year history of the system. That’s more than twice as many as the new schools bring to the table, all of them by Boise State (two).

But what choice did the Big East have? After the latest ACC raid, it just needed a heartbeat.

Here is  breakdown between the old and new. Decide for yourself if the Big East is worthy of a BCS bid.

(Note: We are considering the “highest level of football” since 1973 when Division I was established by the NCAA. Boise State moved up to Division I-A in 1996. All ranking references are to the Associated Press and BCS.)

 

Boise State

Conference: Mountain West, first year

Age of program at highest level of college football: 16th year in Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Broncos ended the season ranked (1998-present): Seven

The last year the Broncos ended the season ranked: 2011

BCS bowls: two (2007 Fiesta, 2010 Fiesta)

 

San Diego State

Conference: Mountain West, 13th year

Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Aztecs ended the season ranked: None.

The last year the Aztecs ended the season ranked: 1977

BCS bowls: None.

 

Houston

Conference: Conference USA, 16th year

Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Cougars ended the season ranked: One (2011)

The last year the Cougars ended the season ranked: 1990

BCS bowls: None



SMU

Conference: Conference USA, sixth year
 
Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Mustangs ended the season ranked: None.

The last year the Mustangs ended ranked: 1984

BCS bowls: None.

  

Central Florida

Conference: Conference USA, sixth year  

Age of program at highest level: 16th year in Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era the Knights ended the season ranked: One (2010)

The last year the Knights ended ranked: 2010.

BCS bowls: None.

 

The skinny on new teams

Average stay in current conference: 8.4 years

Average age of new programs at highest level of football: 29.8 years

Total seasons in the BCS era that ended with a ranking: Nine (average of 1.8 times per school)

Average length of time, in years, since last end-of-season ranking: 16.4 years

Last season ranked at the end of the season: Boise, 2011

Total BCS bowls: Two.

 

The skinny on departing teams (West Virginia, Pittsburgh, Syracuse)

Average stay in current conference: 20 years (Each year was a charter member in football.)

Average age of programs playing at the highest level of football: 39

Total seasons in the BCS era that ended with a ranking: 12 (average of four times per school)

Average length of time, in years, since last end-of-season ranking: four

Last season ranked at end of the season: 2011 (West Virginia)

Total BCS bowls: 5


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Comments

Since: Oct 1, 2007
Posted on: December 7, 2011 5:01 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

A lateral move with a pay raise???  That doesn't make sense.  If it is a pay raise (which here will be significant) its not a lateral move.  Question:  Would you quit your current job to take the same job elsewhere for more money? 




Since: Jan 19, 2007
Posted on: December 7, 2011 5:00 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

How about no conferences get an automatic BCS bid?

Just take the top 10 ranked teams and match them up in BCS games. Try not to include intra-conference games. Have an elite SEC team play an elite PAC10 or Big10 team in bowls.

If the Big East or any other conference doesn't have a team ranked in the top 10 at the end of the season, they should not get to be the pee in the punchbowl.

Best way to get into a BCS bowl is to develop outstanding programs. Then the rewards will come. Don't penalize teams for staying in the SEC or the Big10 or the PAC10when they could leave and dominate other conferences and get a much easier BCS bid. 



Since: Oct 23, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 4:56 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Louisville is the real Big 12 target.  Cincy is more of a throw-in to get to the magical 12th team if necessary.

The Senator from Kentucky practically threatened lawsuits against the Big 12 if they did not take them over WVU 2 months ago.

Louisville was assured they were next and sort of backed off using Congress.  They are already packed and out the door.

There was remote chance of getting Notre Dame, so the Big 12 wanted to wait and see if that would entice Missouri to stay as well.

Missouri is gone.  Notre Dame is doing nothing.  Oklahoma State really needed a title game.  The Big 12 will expand.

I think Louisville is essentially a done deal to the Big 12.



Since: Dec 26, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 4:24 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Cincinnati only has the 65,790 capacity stadium a couple times per year when they "borrow" the Bengals' Paul Brown Stadium. Cincy's on-campus stadium is the historic Nippert Stadium that barely seats 35,000 give or take another 1,000 packed in. The way Nippert is designed and how it is crammed in between buildings on campus, there is no room to expand it anymore (unless somehow they dig down.) There is no way UC would allow the Bearcats to abandon Nippert for a full season of in-conference games, save maybe 2 per year against the likes of Oklahoma or Texas (if they do go to the Big 12.)




Since: Apr 3, 2007
Posted on: December 7, 2011 4:20 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Money and an undeserved automatic BCS bid for Boise State. Respect for strength of schedule unfortunately won't come with this move. It's a lateral move with a pay raise. That's about it.



Since: Apr 3, 2007
Posted on: December 7, 2011 4:19 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Money and an undeserved automatic BCS bid for Boise State. Respect for strength of schedule unfortunately won't come with this move. It's a lateral move with a pay raise. That's about it.



Since: Oct 22, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 4:18 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

uh yea. should the big east even get an automatic bid to the BCS now. The conference is a joke now. ridiculous



Since: Sep 4, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 4:16 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

B12 is not expanding they prefer 10. Their championship game lost money. Texas prefer's 10 and they get what they want.

B12 is not very stable. The second the Pac12 comes calling then 4 teams will bolt.

Many of the teams will expand their stadiums. Houston is already in the process of expanding.

BE football conference is better now than it was with Pitt, Cuse and WV. I think everyone would say currently boise>WV, Houston>Pitt, UCF > Cuse.

Logic of this article is terrible.



Since: Oct 23, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 4:07 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

WVU - 60,000 seats
Syracuse - 50,000
Pittsburgh - 65,000

Boise - 33,500
UCF - 45,301
Houston - 32,000
SMU - 32,000
San Diego State - 70,561

I just don't see how this league can survive with tiny stadiums all over the country.   The AQ status will evaporate in 2013.

Cincinnati (65,790) and Louisville (57,000) are ready to bolt as soon as the invite comes.

Poor Facilites, Patchwork Membership, Mediocre Academics, geographic nonsense, zero brand identity, and shaky loyalty is a horrible mix.

The Mountain West should have expanded instead.  It would have taken the Big East's spot naturally in time.



Since: Nov 27, 2007
Posted on: December 7, 2011 4:03 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Your premise is a bad one.

Your reasoning in saying the new schools are bad is because they don't have any BCS Bowls.......but by the nature of how things work, the only teams that can PLAY in the BCS Bowls essentially are teams in the Big Conferences.....which none of them are a part of.  Sure, you might slip in to one spot like Boise did if you have an unbelievable season, but saying this is a sham because the new teams do not have any BCS appearances is not a good argument.  If you want to look at records and lack of ANY bowl appearances, then that is one way to look at it.  Your argument doesn't work


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