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Blog Entry

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Posted on: December 6, 2011 5:32 pm
Edited on: December 7, 2011 10:03 am
 

Start with the fact the Big East has BCS membership only because of a hall pass.

The BCS commissioners awarded the conference a waiver to stay in the club in 2007 just, well, because. Back then, the Big East still had enough existing juice from its teams and power from its administrators to keep its nose under the BCS tent.

No more.

You don’t have to be told that the Big East hasn’t had a team ranked in the final BCS top 20 since 2009. Or had one team in the top 10 of the BCS since 2008. (The Big Ten has had seven.) Such things matter when a conference is being awarded an $18 million-$20 million bowl game each year just, because.

That’s why you may have noticed the Big East is expanding, to chase that magic BCS berth like it was a contact high. CBSSports.com’s Brett McMurphy reported Tuesday that Boise State, San Diego State, Houston, SMU and Central Florida will join the league in 2013.

The problem is no one really knows what it all means. Four of the five new schools are basically warm bodies to keep the Big East afloat. The league is hoping the fifth, Boise, can keep the conference in the BCS big time. Air Force and Navy may join later.

But there’s no certainty the BCS is even going to be around in a few years. Commissioners will spend most of the next year deciding what college football’s postseason will look like beginning in 2014 (when the current BCS contract expires). The question – now that there is a bit of clarity regarding Big East membership – is if the league is better off with this current expansion.

Short answer: No. Not even close. The schools that have left – West Virginia, Syracuse and Pittsburgh – have accounted for five BCS bowls in the 14-year history of the system. That’s more than twice as many as the new schools bring to the table, all of them by Boise State (two).

But what choice did the Big East have? After the latest ACC raid, it just needed a heartbeat.

Here is  breakdown between the old and new. Decide for yourself if the Big East is worthy of a BCS bid.

(Note: We are considering the “highest level of football” since 1973 when Division I was established by the NCAA. Boise State moved up to Division I-A in 1996. All ranking references are to the Associated Press and BCS.)

 

Boise State

Conference: Mountain West, first year

Age of program at highest level of college football: 16th year in Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Broncos ended the season ranked (1998-present): Seven

The last year the Broncos ended the season ranked: 2011

BCS bowls: two (2007 Fiesta, 2010 Fiesta)

 

San Diego State

Conference: Mountain West, 13th year

Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Aztecs ended the season ranked: None.

The last year the Aztecs ended the season ranked: 1977

BCS bowls: None.

 

Houston

Conference: Conference USA, 16th year

Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Cougars ended the season ranked: One (2011)

The last year the Cougars ended the season ranked: 1990

BCS bowls: None



SMU

Conference: Conference USA, sixth year
 
Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Mustangs ended the season ranked: None.

The last year the Mustangs ended ranked: 1984

BCS bowls: None.

  

Central Florida

Conference: Conference USA, sixth year  

Age of program at highest level: 16th year in Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era the Knights ended the season ranked: One (2010)

The last year the Knights ended ranked: 2010.

BCS bowls: None.

 

The skinny on new teams

Average stay in current conference: 8.4 years

Average age of new programs at highest level of football: 29.8 years

Total seasons in the BCS era that ended with a ranking: Nine (average of 1.8 times per school)

Average length of time, in years, since last end-of-season ranking: 16.4 years

Last season ranked at the end of the season: Boise, 2011

Total BCS bowls: Two.

 

The skinny on departing teams (West Virginia, Pittsburgh, Syracuse)

Average stay in current conference: 20 years (Each year was a charter member in football.)

Average age of programs playing at the highest level of football: 39

Total seasons in the BCS era that ended with a ranking: 12 (average of four times per school)

Average length of time, in years, since last end-of-season ranking: four

Last season ranked at end of the season: 2011 (West Virginia)

Total BCS bowls: 5


Comments

Since: Sep 5, 2011
Posted on: December 7, 2011 3:22 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Boise State is better than WVU; SDSU, Houston, SMU are better than Syracuse or Pitt; and, UCF is coming on strong.


They may be better this year, but overall, the programs are not better. UCF coming along means what. Weren't they 2-9 in CUSA and are now about to have NCAA violations?





Since: Dec 7, 2011
Posted on: December 7, 2011 3:00 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

I don't know what people expect the Big East to do. Other conferences have ignored the geographic issues and they're simply not that important. Look at the travel teams do regularly anyway. Also, if you really look at the added teams versus the departing ones, the Big East did well. Boise State is better than WVU; SDSU, Houston, SMU are better than Syracuse or Pitt; and, UCF is coming on strong. Overall, given the sad state of college realignment, I applaud the Big East for pulling victory from the jaws of death. Of course, the ACC (Always Cheating Conference) may get restless again and try to add UConn, Rutgers, Louisville, etc. . . but maybe the BCS bid process will change by then, as it is clearly unfair at best. I love college football, but it's just not that important in the east, so the addition of teams from other regions can only help its stability.



Since: Sep 5, 2011
Posted on: December 7, 2011 2:57 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

and would beat West Virginia most of the time.


I like Boise State and all, but that blue turf must be getting to your head.  



Since: Sep 5, 2011
Posted on: December 7, 2011 2:54 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Also, it is interesting that Dodd gives credit to WVU for being ranked this year, but fails to give Houston the same credit. Couldn't Dodd at least be honest?


The final rankings for the 2010 season come out in 2011. 



Since: Oct 12, 2011
Posted on: December 7, 2011 2:52 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Now you see why it's critical for WVU to get out of this conference.  Dodd got it right in saying most of these additions are warm bodies to keep the BE afloat, they do nothing in terms of giving the Big East street cred, and with all of them coming in as football only members it will only serve to exacerbate the awkward hybrid nature of the league.  (Something virtually all of the past member schools cited as a major factor in their decision to leave)  Had WVU stuck it out with the BE they would be making at least 2 trips per year out west, plus a long trip to FL every year instead of every other year.  It's better to do all that travelling in a strong conference like the Big 12.  WVU may not be able to make 3 BCS bowls in 7 years (at least in the short term), but they will be making double, and maybe even triple the money from the Big 12's TV deal.  Plus the non-BCS bowl lineup in the Big 12 is significantly better than the Big East's.  Factor in that the Big 12 is likely to add Louisville and Cincy sometime down the road, giving WVU two "geographic partner" schools and there is virtually no downside to moving to the Big 12.  The only downside is loosing long time rivalries, but it takes two to tango, as they saying goes.  Those games are already history thanks to the likes of BC, Pitt, Syracuse, and VT going to the All Chumps Conference. 

 



Since: Oct 18, 2010
Posted on: December 7, 2011 2:40 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Dodd is really reaching here...he mentions the 3 teams leaving the Big East (Pitt, Syracuse, West Virginia) have been to 5 bowl games and BSU has only been to 2. 

NEWS FLASH:  Pitt, Syracuse, and West Virginia made it to bowl games because their conference has AUTOMATIC BIDS!!!  Put Boise in a conference that has AUTOMATIC BIDS since 2002 and I guarantee they get at least 6 Bowl Bids. 



Since: Sep 11, 2006
Posted on: December 7, 2011 2:35 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

http://www.playitonthefield.com



Since: Jul 6, 2008
Posted on: December 7, 2011 2:29 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

ggls

Your post was so funny, I will bet you believe NASA faked the moon landings too. What is more likey to happen is that in 2014, the BE will lose it's bid and BSU will get "hosed" once again. So when I read posts like yours myself and friends are glad it happens.



Since: Sep 23, 2008
Posted on: December 7, 2011 2:14 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Although this is a pure money grab for the conference and makes absolutely zero geographic sense, this could benefit Boise by giving them greater control over their BCS fate and possibly allowing them to keep Chris Petersen by having major conference affiliation. 



Since: Jan 29, 2008
Posted on: December 7, 2011 1:51 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

All the while Pitt, WVU and Syracuse will never see another conference championship or BCS bowl. They have had the entire BCS life to develope their football programs and failed.


In what world do you live in do you see the last ten years of WVU football as failing?  2-0 in BCS games (W's over SEC Champion Georiga and Big 12 Champion Oklahoma), consistently ranked year in and year out including this year, four straight bowl wins this decade.  It's pointless to list all of the accomplishments, but this is not failure.  Your comment is ill-informed at best.


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