Tag:Billy Butler
Posted on: December 30, 2011 5:18 pm
Edited on: December 31, 2011 11:19 am
 

And the Bloggies go to...



By C. Trent Rosecrans

No need to get dressed up -- but the Bloggies are here and they're best viewed in sweatpants or pajama pants. The winners, the winner get nothing. But we get to fill out a post and bring something new.

So, Monday (Part I) and Tuesday (Part II), we put up the nominees in several categories and let the fans vote. Well, we couldn't just stick to that, because we all know the internets is for disagreement over awards, so Matt Snyder and I will chime in with our picks, as well.

Best Moment(s) of 2011
Fans: World Series Game 6
Snyder: Game 6
Rosecrans: Sept. 28

Most Historic Milestone
Fans: Derek Jeter's 3,000th
Snyder: Jim Thome's 600th
Rosecrans: Jeter's 3,000th

Biggest Surprise
Fans: Cardinals
Snyder: Albert Pujols to the Angels
Rosecrans: Cardinals

Biggest Disappointment -- Individual section
Fans: Ryan Braun's failed test
Snyder: Braun
Rosecrans: Coco Crisp not sticking with the 'fro

Biggest Disappointment -- Team
Fans: Red Sox
Snyder: Red Sox
Rosecrans: Red Sox

Most Bush League Moment
Fans: Carlos Zambrano quitting on his teammates
Snyder: Carlos Guillen's celebration in the Jered Weaver/Tigers feud
Rosecrans: Zambrano

Worst Call
Fans: Jerry Meals
Snyder: Billy Butler's "inside the park" home run
Rosecrans: Meals

Biggest "Can't-Look-Away" Character
Fans: Ozzie Guillen
Snyder: Nyjer Morgan
Rosecrans: Guillen

Best Twitterer
Fans: @DatDudeBP (Brandon Phillips)
Snyder: @BMcCarthy32 (Brandon McCarthy)
Rosecrans: @BMcCarthy32

Biggest bonehead move
Fans: Mike Leake been caught stealing
Snyder: Leake
Rosecrans: Leake

Best celebration
Fans: None: They're all lame
Snyder: None
Rosecrans: None

Weirdest injury
Fans; Matt Holliday and the moth
Snyder: Holliday
Rosecrans: Holliday

Most impressive home run
Fans: Francisco

Snyder: Upton

Rosecrans: Upton

Best defensively play
Fans: Phillips

Snyder: Revere

Rosecrans: Revere

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS feed and "like" us on Facebook.

Posted on: December 26, 2011 3:31 pm
Edited on: December 27, 2011 3:51 pm
 

Voting for the 2011 MLB Bloggies, Part I



By Matt Snyder


With just a few days left until 2012 brings us a whole new year, it's only fitting to look back at the year that was. Sure, there's an actual baseball season, including spring training, the regular season and the postseason, but things happen nearly every day throughout the entire calendar year. So we're going to create a fake award and call it a Bloggie.

We'll set the table with some nominations and let you, our readers, vote for the winners. This is just Part I. Tuesday, we bring you Part II. Friday, we'll post the winners and our staff picks. Without further ado ...

Best Moment(s) of 2011
No-Hitters: Justin Verlander, Ervin Santana and Francisco Liriano all tossed a no-hitter during the 2011 season, with Verlander doing so for the second time in his career.
10-year anniversary of 9/11: The Cubs and the Mets played the Sunday Night Game on September 11 in New York's Citi Field, with the game itself taking a backseat to the pre-game memorial for the victims and the honoring of service men and women. 
September 28th: Rarely -- if ever -- has the final day of the regular season provided so much drama, as the Cardinals and Rays completed epic comebacks to steal the respective wild cards. Evan Longoria put the cherry on top of an all-around amazing night of baseball with his walk-off home run.
Cooper Stone throws out first pitch: Months after losing his father, Shannon Stone, to a tragic fall, young Cooper Stone threw out the ceremonial first pitch of ALDS Game 1. The catcher? His favorite player, Josh Hamilton, who then embraced Stone just in front of the pitcher's mound.
Game 6: Eleven innings. Nineteen runs. Fifteen pitchers. Beltre and Cruz go deep back-to-back. Freese's triple. Hamilton's homer. Berkman's clutch single. And Freese's walk-off. This was one for the ages in one of the best World Series in recent memory.



Most Historic Milestone
Jeter's 3,000th: On July 9, Derek Jeter hit a home run for hit number 3,000, becoming the 28th player in baseball history to join the elite group.
Thome's 600th: On August 15, Jim Thome went deep twice, the second home run being the 600th of his illustrious career. Only seven other players in big-league history have reached that plateau.
Rivera's 602nd: On September 19, Mariano Rivera locked down the save with ease. It was the 602nd of his career, making him the all-time leader.
Triple Crowned: Verlander led the American League in wins, strikeouts and ERA. Clayton Kershaw pulled off the same feat in the National League. The last time each league had a pitcher take the triple crown was 1924.
Most Valuable: Verlander won both the Cy Young and the AL MVP awards, marking the first time a starting pitcher won the MVP since 1986 and the 10th time in history a player won both the Cy Young and MVP.



Biggest Surprise
The Cardinals: Not only were the eventual World Series champions virtually left for dead in late August, but they went all season without their ace, as Adam Wainwright suffered a season-ending injury in spring training.
The D-Backs: The Arizona Diamondbacks were predicted to finish last in the NL West by nearly everyone. They had finished last the past two seasons, too. But these Snakes came out and won the West by a whopping eight games and took the Brewers to the limit in the NLDS.
The Rays: Yes, the Tampa Bay Rays had won the AL East two of the previous three seasons, but they also lost several key pieces and the payroll was $30 million less than it was in 2010. And the Rays still took the AL wild card from the mighty Red Sox on the final day of the regular season.
Pujols to L.A.: Albert Pujols was a St. Louis Cardinals icon. While he appeared to be flirting with other teams, it only seemed like a ploy to get the Cardinals to pay him more. He wouldn't really leave, would he? Well, he did, signing with the Angels on the final morning of the Winter Meetings.
Marlins' spending spree: For years we've watched the Florida Marlins deal potential high-salary players and be one of the most notoriously frugal clubs around. And then, in less than a week, the newly-named Miami Marlins inked three big-name free agents -- Jose Reyes, Heath Bell and Mark Buehrle.



Biggest Disappointment -- Individual section
Dunn is done: Adam Dunn has one of the most historically awful offensive seasons ever, and he's a DH. And it was only the first year of a four-year, $56 million contract.
No mo fro? Coco Crisp let his dreads out twice to reveal an incredibly awesome afro. But he didn't stick with it. And, yes, we realize this is a disappointment on a different level, but the Bloggies don't necessarily have to be serious.
Fractured: Marlins bench player Scott Cousins leveled star Giants catcher at home plate, a play in which Posey suffered a season-ending broken leg.
Juiced? NL MVP Ryan Braun failed a drug test and is facing a 50-game suspension, if his appeal is not upheld.



Biggest Disappointment -- Team
Red Sox: You may have heard of a collapse ...
Braves: You may have heard of a collapse ...
Twins: Lots of injuries and underperformance left the two-time defending AL Central champs with 99 losses.
Giants: The defending World Series champs finished eight games back in the NL West and four out in the wild card, sporting one of the worst offenses in baseball.



Most Bush League Moment
Weaver vs. Detroit: Magglio Ordonez watches a home run to see if it's fair or foul. Jered Weaver misinterprets it and thinks he's been shown up, so he has some words for the Tigers. Then Carlos Guillen hits a home run and basically stands still, staring down Weaver. Weaver then threw at Alex Avila and was tossed from the game while screaming at the entire Tigers dugout. You can place blame with Weaver, Guillen or both of them. However you slice it, though, at least one person was far out of line.
Big Z(ero): Carlos Zambrano gets knocked around by the Braves, throws at Chipper Jones -- getting himself ejected -- and then bails on his teammates. Some overheard him talking retirement, but he now is trying to work his way back.
Molina's "spittle:" Yadier Molina may not have intentionally spit on umpire Rob Drake back on August 2, but he did freak out far too much over a called strike and get himself suspended for five games during a pennant race.
Nyjer's mouth: Brewers outfielder Nyjer Morgan was a polarizing figure all season and that was solidified after the Brewers beat the D-Backs in the NLDS. Morgan was overheard screaming f-bombs right behind a field reporter. OK, maybe he didn't realize it was on live TV. But then when he was summoned for an interview on national TV, he made sure to say it loud and clear right into the microphone.



Worst Call
No pitching inside: Clayton Kershaw was ejected September 14 for (barely) hitting Gerardo Parra with a pitch on the elbow. Kershaw had been seen jawing with Parra the previous night, but he also had a one-hitter going and the pitch wasn't very far inside. It definitely seemed like an overreaction by home plate umpire Bill Welke.
Let's go home: An epic 19-inning game ended on a blown call at home plate by Jerry Meals, calling runner Julio Lugo safe at home and giving the Braves the victory over the Pirates on July 26.
Home run? On August 17, Royals DH Billy Butler hit what appeared to be a double in the gap. It bounced high off the outfield wall, hitting some fencing above padding on the wall. The umpires initially ruled a home run, but the play was put under video review. Replays pretty conclusively showed the ball staying in the park -- even the hometown Kansas City announcers were discussing that when the umpires emerged Butler would be ordered to head to second base. Butler was standing on the top step of the dugout with his helmet on when the umpires emerged and upheld the ruling.
Missed tag: In Game 3 of the World Series, Rangers second baseman Ian Kinsler made an errant throw that pulled first baseman Mike Napoli off the bag. Napoli made a swipe tag that very clearly got Cardinals baserunner Matt Holliday in time. First base umpire Ron Kulpa, however, blew the call, opening the door to a big inning for the Cardinals.



Biggest "Can't-Look-Away" Character
These don't really need an explanation, so we'll jump right to the poll ...



Coming Tuesday: Part II, including Boneheaded Moves of the Year, Weirdest Injury and Most Impressive Home Run
Coming Friday: Voting results and staff picks

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS feed and "like" us on Facebook.



Posted on: December 1, 2011 12:30 pm
 

Homegrown Team: Kansas City Royals



By Matt Snyder


What if players were only permitted to stay with the team that originally made them a professional? No trades, no Rule-5 Draft, no minor or major league free agency ... once you are a professional baseball player, you stay in that organization. This series shows how all 30 teams would look. We give you: Homegrown teams. To view the schedule/past entries of this feature, click here.

Long a punching bag for fans and media alike, the Kansas City Royals have become a darling in recent years due to their strong farm system. We keep hearing about how they'll be a World Series caliber team by 2014 and the first wave of strong talent hit the bigs in 2011 -- with Eric Hosmer and Mike Moustakas leading the charge. There's more on the way, too. For the purposes of this exercise, though, the Royals get to add two All-Star veterans to the lineup who have long since departed. Oh, and they get back an aloof ace.

Lineup

1. Alex Gordon, LF
2. Johnny Damon, RF
3. Eric Hosmer, 1B
4. Carlos Beltran, CF
5. Billy Butler, DH
6. Mike Moustakas, 3B
7. Salvador Perez, C
8. Johnny Giavotella, 2B
9. Mike Aviles, SS

Starting Rotation

1. Zack Greinke
2. Luke Hochevar
3. Aaron Crow
4. Danny Duffy
5. Chad Durbin

Bullpen

Closer - J.P. Howell
Set up - Jeremy Affeldt, Greg Holland, Blake Wood, Tim Byrdak, Mike MacDougal
Long - Louis Coleman

Notable Bench Players

Matt Treanor, Kila Ka'aihue, Mark Ellis, David DeJesus, Mitch Maier, Jarrod Dyson

What's Good?

That really looks like a nice lineup. There's obviously some growing up to be done in the 6-7-8 spots, but that's a lot easier done when the top five spots are that strong. And remember, Wil Myers is on the way ...

What's Not?

With Beltran and Damon getting up into their high-30s, the outfield defense would lack range. Of course, DeJesus and Dyson are both available off the bench as late-inning defensive replacements, so the situation wouldn't be dire. There is no real closer, but that's a bit overrated anyway. And the starting rotation leaves something to be desired, for now, until Crow and Duffy prove their worth and some of the other prospects (like John Lamb and Mike Montgomery) start to arrive.

Comparison to real 2011

It's actually pretty similar, aside from a few huge names. These Royals have Beltran and Damon instead of Melky Cabrera and Jeff Francoeur, while Greinke has been thrown atop the rotation. Those are upgrades and, remember, the real-life Royals didn't get full seasons out of many of their young players. It's reasonable to put this squad above .500 and maybe even lingering around in the playoff chase into August.

Up Next: Atlanta Braves

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Posted on: September 27, 2011 7:58 pm
 

10 finalists for Hutch Award revealed

By Matt Snyder

The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has revealed 10 Major League Baseball players as finalists for the 2011 Hutch Award.

The award is given to a "player who best exemplifies the honor, courage and dedication of legendary baseball player and manager Fred Hutchinson" -- who played 10 seasons for the Tigers from 1939-1953, missing a chunk due to service in World War II. He also managed the Tigers, Cardinals and Reds during a 13-season managerial career. He then died of cancer in 1964 at the age of 45 and the research center was founded by his brother.

Here are the 10 players nominated for the Hutch Award this season, as chosen by the research center's national committee:

Billy Butler, Royals
Tony Campana, Cubs
Michael Cuddyer, Twins
Curtis Granderson, Yankees
Josh Hamilton, Rangers
Torii Hunter, Angels
Justin Masterson, Indians
Brian McCann, Braves
Jake Peavy, White Sox
Josh Willingham, A's

Last season's winner was Tim Hudson of the Braves. The first winner was Yankees great Mickey Mantle back in 1965. A full list of past winners can be viewed by clicking here. The winner of the 2011 Hutch Award will be revealed in February.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: August 18, 2011 12:56 pm
Edited on: August 18, 2011 2:28 pm
 

Torre: Umpires were wrong in KC

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Joe Torre said Thursday that the umpires of Wednesday's Royals-Yankees games erred in giving Billy Butler a home run, Ken Davidoff of Newsday tweets.

Torre, baseball's head honcho for on-field matters, said umpire Dana DeMuth "feels very badly about it," but probably not as badly as Yankees manager Joe Girardi. Girardi didn't file a protest, so the matter is now closed, Torre told Davidoff.

If Girardi had protested, Torre said, "I can't tell you what the result would have been, but we certainly would have had to look at it." 

Torre told Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News that there was a "misunderstanding" by the umpires of the ground rules at Kansas City's Kauffman Stadium.

"The replay gave him every look that he needed to make the right call," Torre said. "He thought he did make the right call. This isn't an umpire not doing his job. That was his understanding of the rule when he's umpired there and nothing had happened to change his mind until last night."

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Posted on: August 17, 2011 11:34 pm
Edited on: August 18, 2011 1:07 am
 

Umpires botch home run call even in review

By Matt Snyder

The Royals just beat the Yankees 5-4, as Jorge Posada watched three strikes with the bases loaded to end the game. But the big story was from much earlier in the game, as the umpires called a ball off Billy Butler's bat a home run that pretty obviously shouldn't have been one. They even went to use the Major League Baseball's instant replay system, emerged from the dugout to reinforce that it was a home run.

Watch the video on MLB.com by clicking here.

Even if you don't want to watch the video and admit what your eyes saw -- which is the ball hitting the top of a padded area of the wall and then hitting the very top of the padded fencing before bouncing back onto the field of play -- there are tell-tale signs it was botched. Butler himself was standing at the top step of the dugout ready to run out to second base before the ruling, for one. Also, the Royals announcers had conceded it would be ruled and double and simply said "wow," when the umpires emerged to rule it a home run.

Meanwhile the umpires refused to comment after the game (Marc Carig via Twitter) and Yankees manager Joe Girardi didn't protest the game, though he wished he would have (Carig on Twitter).

Butler's home run was a solo shot, but the Royals won by one, so the call was a huge deal. The Yankees hold just a half-game lead in the AL East, too, so the one game could end up being a pretty huge deal in terms of postseason implications. I stop short from saying this call cost the Yankees the game, because there are so many variables in any single game that changing one thing changes everything that follows. We have no way of knowing what would have happened had the call been correctly made. That's the problem. We'll never know.

The most disturbing part about this is that replay was used. If you're going to implement a replay system with the intent of getting calls such as these correct, the calls should actually end up, you know, correct -- especially when they are obvious.

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Posted on: July 30, 2011 1:53 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Renteria stings old team



By C. Trent Rosecrans

Edgar Renteria, Reds: The reigning World Series MVP stuck it to his old team with an RBI single in the 13th inning, ending Cincinnati's four-game losing skid. Renteria hasn't been very good this year -- hitting .238/.305/.298 -- but he came up big against Giants closer Brian Wilson, lining a single down the right-field line to score Jay Bruce from second for a 4-3 Reds win. It was his second walk-off RBI of the year in extras and he's now 5 for 9 in extra innings. A little extra praise here for Reds reliever Jose Arredondo, who not only picked up the victory, but also singled off Wilson in his first big-league plate appearance after the Reds had run out of position players.

Jeremy Guthrie, Orioles: With several teams scouting Baltimore's right-hander, the 32-year-old impressed, holding the Yankees to just four hits and one run in seven innings. The Cardinals, Tigers, Brewers, Rangers and Red Sox have all expressed interest in Guthrie, who lowered his ERA from 4.33 to 4.18 and improved his record to 5-14.

A.J. Pierzynski, White Sox: In a washing machine, the red socks will overpower the white ones -- but recently it's been the other way around on the baseball field. Pierzynski's two-run homer in the seventh inning led to Chicago's seventh straight victory over Boston and its 14th win in the last 16 battles of the Sox. Both teams managed just three hits, but Pierzynski made his lone hit count, homering off of Tim Wakefield to break a 1-1 tie in the seventh to deny Wakefield his 200th career victory.


Hitting streaks: Florida's Emilio Bonifacio and Boston's Dustin Pedroia both went 0 for 4 on Friday, ending a 26-game hitting streak for Bonifacio and a 25-game hitting streak for Pedroia. Both of their teams also lost while managing just three hits -- the Marlins 5-0 in Atlanta and the Red Sox 3-1 to the White Sox.

Charlie Morton, Pirates: Much has been made of the similarities between Morton and Roy Halladay -- their motions do look awfully similar. But on Friday, the results couldn't be more different. Morton allowed eight runs on nine hits in four innings, while Halladay allowed just a single hit over seven innings in Philadelphia's 10-3 victory over the Pirates.

Carlos Carrasco, Indians: After giving up his third homer of the game -- a fourth-inning grand slam by Melky Cabrera (that Cabrera admired for way too long) -- the Indians right-hander threw at the head of Royals DH Billy Butler, who had homered in the first. Carrasco was immediately ejected by home plate umpire Scott Barry. Butler was restrained by Indians catcher Lou Marson and both dugouts and benches cleared. Not to be outdone, Carrasco yelled back at Royals players as he exited the field. Carrasco took his ninth loss of the season and allowed seven runs on seven hits in 3 1/3 innings. Butler added his second homer later in the game.

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Posted on: July 1, 2011 9:48 am
Edited on: July 1, 2011 12:36 pm
 

Pepper: Royals gearing up for trades


With interleague play heading into the last week, is it still a good idea? What can you expect from the return of Rich Harden? Danny Knobler joins Adam Aizer with the latest.

By Evan Brunell


The Royals are preparing for trade season, but caution that they won't just start dealing players if it doesn't make sense.

"We won’t move forward in any direction that doesn’t fit long term with what we’re trying to do,” GM Dayton Moore said. "We’ll always look for ways to improve our baseball team and be open-minded. There are a lot of potentially creative ideas that could exist"

Moore is expected to listen to trade offers for veteran players such as Jeff Francouer, Bruce Chen and the like, plus bigger pieces like Joakim Soria and Billy Butler. While K.C. would charge a high price for Soria, scouts are intrigued by Billy Butler and believe the DH could play in the NL.

“Have you watched Prince Fielder or Ryan Howard play defense?” one scout asked. “I don’t think they’re any better [defensively] than Butler. The bigger concern is he’s not driving the ball like he did in the past.”

Scouts also believe that the most interest will likely come for Wilson Betemit, Melky Cabrera and Mike Aviles. Betemit is being squeezed out but has still put up productive numbers that any team could use in the infield, while Cabrera is hitting for significantly more power than in his forgettable 2010. Aviles, meanwhile, is at Triple-A after being optioned recently, but that may only serve to boost his value.

“Teams love those guys with options,” one scout said. “You stash them away until you need them, and Aviles is one of those guys who has shown he can hit. He’s the type of guy who can really help a good team.” (Kansas City Star)

ON THE HUNT: The Tigers are looking around for starting pitching, as behind Justin Verlander there hasn't been much production in the rotation. Phil Coke just lost his spot to Charlie Furbush, but that appears to be nothing more than a Band-Aid. The problem is that many teams are still in the postseason hunt, shrinking the available candidates. Detroit could use a left-handed starter, which plays well in their park. That could lead to the Royals' Bruce Chen or Astros' Wandy Rodriguez being moved to the Motor City. (Fox Sports)

WAITING: Chris Davis has torn apart Triple-A and is proving he has nothing left at that level to prove. Davis has 19 home runs and a .363 batting average in just 24 games. Both manager Ron Washington and GM Jon Daniels admit that Davis is ready for the majors, but the slugger will have to wait for a spot to open. (ESPN Dallas)

SLUMP-BUSTER
: The White Sox are headed to Wrigley Field for a weekend series and Adam Dunn has to be hoping a return to friendly grounds will spark his season. Dunn's 1.061 OPS is the highest mark he's registered in any stadium with at least 25 at-bats, an OPS he can only dream of given his current .619 showing. (Baseball-Reference's Dunn page)

HEAD-FIRST: Elvis Andrus will not be diving head-first into bases for some time after spraining the wrist last week on such a slide. "I have to," Andrus said. "I don't want to be in between on that play again. For now I feel comfortable if I go feet first. I used to do it a lot last year every time so it won't be that hard. I just mentally focus and try to protect my wrist for a little while and then when I feel comfortable I will [slide head first] for sure." (Ft. Worth Star-Telegram)

DREW BOOED: J.D. Drew was roundly booed Thursday when he entered the game as a pinch-hitter in the seventh, marking the first time he played in the Philadelphia series. He would go on to knock a single in the ninth, which he mentioned was his "only source of revenge." Drew also noted he is not booed when out of uniform and doesn't think he is recognized. In the same story, several Red Sox react to the news of Mike Cameron's designation for assignment. (Boston Herald)

THANKS FOR THE HELP: Marcos Mateo shut out the Giants for five innings Thursday, but Chicago needs fresh arms thanks to a makeup game Monday, doubleheader Tuesday and 13-inning gamer Thursday. While Mateo may deserve to stay in the bigs, he could be jettisoned to make room for a fresh arm, which could end up being Kerry Wood, who is ready to come off the DL. (Chicago Tribune)

REHAB SET: Dustin McGowan hasn't pitched in a big-league game since 2008 and already saw his rehab bid set back with forearm stiffness. But now, McGowan will graduate from extended spring training to Class A. He will have 30 days before he must be activated from the DL or put him back on. (MLB.com)

FIRST PITCH: Carlos Zambrano left Thursday's game with lower back soreness in the second, but threw out the first pitch for the National Pro Fastpitch Bandits' softball game later that night. Outrage or no big deal? You decide. (@CSNBoyle)

BEER DROPPING: A combination of both the Cubs and White Sox playing poorly along with less than optimal weather has seen what Rich Harris, a vendor for both teams, says is a 30 percent less load. That's a lot of money for beer vendors, who get paid on commission, to miss out on.  "The best thing baseball-wise that could happen from here on out on both sides of town is win, win, win," Harris said. "That would make everyone happy -- the teams, the fans and us." (Chicago Tribune)

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com