Tag:Bobby Jenks
Posted on: December 10, 2011 11:00 pm
 

Red Sox to experiment with Bard as a starter

Daniel Bard

By C. Trent Rosecrans

By most accounts -- or guesses, really at this point -- Daniel Bard appears to be the closer for the Red Sox in 2012. However, going into spring training, Bard will work as a starter, new manager Bobby Valentine said on Saturday.

Speaking to a live audience of fans at Christmas at Fenway, Valentine said he's already spoken to the 26-year-old Bard about working as a starter at the beginning of spring training.

"He's going to be penciled in to be one of those guys who works going from his bullpen to pitching two innings to pitching four innings to pitching six innings," Valentine said (via the Boston Globe). "Whenever we get to that plateau, with the pitching coach I'll hopefully have by my side soon, and all the members of the staff and front office. We'll have to make a determination after that 18-20 inning mark as to where he will be during the season. I told him to prepare to be a starter and if that, in fact, does not happen to be ready and willing to be our closer."

Bard went 2-9 with a 3.33 ERA with a save in 2011, with 74 strikeouts in 73 innings. In his three years in the majors, Bard is 5-13 with a 2.88 ERA and five saves, striking out 213 in 197 innings. He hasn't started a game in the big leagues.

A starter in college at North carolina, Bard started 22 games in 2007, his first year of professional baseball, but hasn't started since. He was 3-7 with a 7.08 ERA at Low-A and High-A in 2007, striking out 47 and walking 78 in 75 innings. He was switched to the bullpen the next season and shot through the minor leagues to the big leagues in 2009.

The move would be similar to what the Rangers have recently done with Alexi Ogando and Neftali Feliz. Ogando stuck in the rotation last season, while Feliz was moved back to the bullpen and used as the team's closer. He's expected to move to the rotation in 2012. Former Ranger and now-Angel, C.J. Wilson was also moved from the bullpen to the rotation in Texas to great success.

The Red Sox could still sign a closer, Ryan Madson and Francisco Cordero are still all the free-agent market. Boston could also turn to former White Sox closer Bobby Jenks, already under contract with the Red Sox. The team could also put another reliever, Alfredo Aceves, into a starter's role in the spring.

Alternately, the team could sign a free-agent starter, such as Roy Oswalt or Hiroki Kuroda, and move Bard back into the closer's role.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: December 6, 2011 1:27 pm
 

Homegrown Team: Los Angeles Angels



By Matt Snyder


What if players were only permitted to stay with the team that originally made them a professional? No trades, no Rule-5 Draft, no minor or major league free agency ... once you are a professional baseball player, you stay in that organization. This series shows how all 30 teams would look. We give you: Homegrown teams. To view the entire schedule and past posts, click here.

While we slog through all the rumors and real-life moves provided by the Winter Meetings, we're here with your daily break from reality. This time around, it's the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

Lineup

1. Erick Aybar, SS
2. Casey Kotchman, 1B
3. Howie Kendrick, LF
4. Mike Napoli, C
5. Mark Trumbo, DH
6. Mike Trout, RF
7. Sean Rodriguez, 2B
8. Alberto Callaspo, 3B
9. Peter Bourjos, CF

Note: Kendrys Morales is here, too, though he's been down with a broken leg for almost two seasons. If healthy, he figures in the DH/1B mix prominently, likely pushing Trumbo to the bench -- but I'd hear arguments for Kotchman to sit instead.

Starting Rotation

1. Jered Weaver
2. Ervin Santana
3. John Lackey
4. Tyler Chatwood
5. Joe Saunders

Bullpen

Closer - Francisco Rodriguez
Set up - Jordan Walden, Bobby Jenks, Darren O'Day, Sean O'Sullivan, Trevor Bell, Kevin Jepsen, Jose Arredondo
Long - Ramon Ortiz

Notable Bench Players

Hank Conger, Jeff Mathis, Alexi Casilla and that's about it.

What's Good?

The front of the starting rotation with Weaver and Santana is very good. The bottom of the lineup is pretty strong, relatively speaking, as those guys could be two-hole hitters on many teams.

What's Not?

There just isn't much exciting about this group. The middle of the lineup is thin, until Trout becomes a star. There is no depth and the rotation is a bit lackluster with Lackey and Saunders, at this point.

Comparison to real 2011

The real-life Angels finished 86-76 and 10 games behind the Rangers in the AL West. They hung around in the wild-card race until the last week of the season, too. While this team certainly isn't terrible, I feel like it's worse than 86 wins. Maybe they could approach .500, but there's just not enough here to be a playoff contender in this fictitious exercise.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: August 8, 2011 7:11 pm
 

Boston's Jenks hospitalized with sickness

Bobby JenksBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Red Sox reliever Bobby Jenks is already on the disabled list but was expect to make a bullpen session on Sunday, but he's been sidelined by sickness.

Before Monday's game, Red Sox manager Terry Francona told reporters the right-hander was suffering from "intestinal turmoil," and underwent a colonoscopy on Monday.

"He got really sick -- I mean, really sick," Francona told reporters, including Brian MacPherson of the Providence Journal. "They ended up having to keep him in the hospital for three days."

Jenks is on the DL with back stiffness for the second time this season and had also spent time on the DL with an elbow injury earlier this season. Jenks has appeared in just 19 games for the Red Sox,with a 2-2 record and 6.32 ERA. He's struck out 17 and walked 13 in 15 2/3 innings. He was expected to return to Fort Myers, Fla., today to continue his rehab, but was unable to make the trip.

Jenks is signed through next season on a two-year, $12 million deal.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 27, 2011 9:54 am
Edited on: June 27, 2011 10:31 am
 

Pepper: Is the trade deadline too soon?

By C. Trent Rosecrans


BASEBALL TODAY: Are the Nationals headed in the right direction with Davey Johnson? MLB.com's Tom Bororstein joins Lauren Shihadi to discuss the Nationals, as well as the upcoming Reds-Rays series, the Indians-Diamondbacks and more.

PUSH IT BACK: In a month, we here at Eye On Baseball will be churning out rumors and speculation left and right -- who has interest in whom, which team is a buyer and which is a seller and what backup second baseman has some trade value. It's part of the baseball calendar, the last weekend of July. But is that too early?

Tim Sullivan of the San Diego Union-Tribune says it is, and I'm not sure he's wrong.

The nonwaiver trade deadline is at the two-thirds mark of the season, and that may be too soon for teams to decide just exactly what their chances are to make the best decision about folding or going all in on a postseason run.

The best reason to change it is that it forces too many teams -- especially those without a high payroll flexibility -- to give up too soon. Who wants to pay to see 25 games or so to see a team that has given up hope? Push the trade deadline back and lie to us a little longer, we like that.

NEW YORK TRADE TIME?: Could this be the year the Mets and Yankees make a big trade with each other? The two teams have only made nine trades with each other in their history. It's unlikely Jose Reyes will go across town, but Francisco Rodriguez, Carlos Beltran, Jason Isringhausen and Tim Byrdak could help the Yankees. [Wall Street Journal]

STRETCHING PINEDA: While nobody gave it any consideration when Michael Pineda broke the Mariners' camp in the rotation, it's now going to become an issue -- will the Mariners allow the rookie starter to add innings to his arm if the Mariners stick in the American League West race?

Seattle manager Eric Wedge says the team has a plan, not just for Pineda but the team's other pitchers as well, to try to limit innings, but still have his starters ready for September. The biggest thing is not limiting innings, but his game-to-game pitch count, Wedge said. [Seattle Times]

BARNEY SAYS IT GETS BETTER: Cubs rookie Darwin Barney not only participated in the "It Gets Better" project aimed at gay teens, but also said he was "honored" to ask. A cool deal for both Barney and an ever better deal for the campaign started by Cubs fan Dan Savage. The Giants have also shot a spot for the project. [Chicago Tribune]

HARANG STILL OUT: Padres starter Aaron Harang is unlikely to return from a stress fracture in his right foot until after the All-Star break. Harang leads the Padres' staff with a 7-2 record and 3.71 ERA. He's been on the DL since June 13. [San Diego Union-Tribune]

SORIA BACK: Since being reinstated as the Royals' closer, Joakim Soria hasn't allowed a run in 10 games (12 innings). He's only allowed four hits and two walks while striking out 12 and notching six saves. [Kansas City Star]

WE'RE GOING STREAKING!: Who is the streakiest team in baseball? Beyondtheboxscore.com has done the math and it's the Boston Red Sox. The least streaky? Well, that would be the consistently bad Chicago Cubs. The Cubs, amazingly enough, haven't won three games in a row all season.

JENKS BACK SOON: Red Sox reliever Bobby Jenks is expected to join the team Monday in Philadelphia and could be activated on Tuesday. [Boston Herald]

Marlins STILL WOOING BIG NAMES: Nobody expects Jack McKeon to manager the Marlins next season. Florida hired its interim manager after last season and look at how that turned out. Apparently owner Jeffrey Loria wants a big-name manager, and that's likely Bobby Valentine or Ozzie Guillen. [Palm Beach Post]

BYRD'S FACEMASK: Bringing flashbacks of Terry Steinbach, Cubs outfielder Marlon Byrd will wear a helmet with extra protection in his rehab start at Triple-A Iowa. Byrd was hit in the face last month and suffered facial fractures. [Chicago Tribune]

FINDING NIMMO: The Mets made Brandon Nimmo the first-ever first-round draft pick from the state of Wyoming. Wyoming hasn't had a first-rounder before because of its combination of low population and harsh climate. Nimmo's dad, Ron, has helped on both causes, raising his sons there and building a barn where they could hone their baseball skills year-round. [New York Post]

CHANGEUP PITCHES: The Brewers want right-hander Yovani Gallardo to throw more changeups. Gallardo is 9-4 with a 3.92 ERA this season, but is throwing the changeup just 1.6 percent of the time and none in his last two starts. The Brewers believe the pitch could help him lower his pitch counts and go deeper into games. [MLB.com]

HANLEY TO STAY AT CLEANUP: The Marlins new regime is going to continue using shortstop Hanley Ramirez as the team's cleanup hitter. Ramirez was hitting .200/.298/.295 overall when he was put in the fourth spot by new manager Jack McKeon and in five games in that spot, he's hitting .400/.429/.450 with four RBI, raising his overall line to .218/.309/.309. [Palm Beach Post]

SMALL GESTURE, BIG DEAL: Phil Rogers of the Chicago Tribune writes a really neat tale of Curt Schilling and a World War II veteran who recently passed away.

ROSE BRINGS 'EM IN: There's apparently not a whole lot going on in the greater Bristol area of Virginia and Tennessee, because Pete Rose is bringing in the fans. No, not the Hit King, but Pete Rose Jr., manager of the Bristol White Sox of the short-season Class A Appalachian League. Still, it's cool Rose is chasing his dream. If there's one thing when you look at his career path, he may not have his father's talent, but he does have his drive. [Bristol Herald Courier]

THIS IS WRONG: That's it. Just wrong. [Yahoo!'s Big League Stew]

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: May 30, 2011 8:04 pm
Edited on: May 30, 2011 8:32 pm
 

Jenks could face former teammates on Tuesday

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Bobby JenksBobby Jenks may face his old team tomorrow, as the former White Sox closer is expected to be activated from the disabled list by the Red Sox on Tuesday.

Jenks was at Fenway Park on Monday, but declined to speak to reporters from Boston or Chicago, according to the Providence Journal.

Jenks made a rehab appearance Sunday in Pawtucket, pitching one inning and allowing a hit and a run. He hit as high as 96 on the radar gun in his second rehab appearance at Triple-A Pawtucket.

"All indications are that it's a good thing he went because he shook a little rust off, even by his own opinion," Boston manager Terry Francona said.

The two Sox teams are meeting for the first time this season, and Jenks is playing against the team he helped to a World Series title in 2005 for the first time in his career. Jenks served as the team's closer from the end of 2005 until last season, when he lost the job midseason. The team then non-tendered him instead of offering him arbitration, so he signed with the Red Sox as a free agent to set up Boston closer Jonathan Papelbon.

Jenks was a long-time problem child with the White Sox, but once he left he went out burning bridges, criticizing White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen, saying Guillen was a problem for the franchise. 

Guillen fired back, saying he lied for Jenks, protected him and gave him days off to babysit his kids. He also added the White Sox wouldn't miss Jenks and none of his former teammates would miss him either.

Guillen's son, Oney, also ripped Jenks on Twitter, which of course had Jenks firing back.

This week, though, things are much quieter. Francona called Guillen last week to suggest neither side talk about the incident leading up to this week.

"I appreciated that," Guillen said Sunday, according to the Chicago Tribune. "It was getting to the point where we weren't being nice guys. I don't think we should have the Boston organization, their players, fans and manager dealing with that.

"It will be a little different when [Jenks] comes to Chicago, but I don't think it's a big deal."

The Red Sox don't go to Chicago until July 29 for a three-game series, their only trip to U.S. Cellular Field this season.

Jenks has appeared in just 11 games for the Red Sox this season, allowing 13 hits and 10 runs (nine earned) in 8 2/3 innings. He's struck out 10 and walked nine. He's been on the disabled list  with biceps tendinitis since May 5.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: May 5, 2011 11:25 am
Edited on: May 5, 2011 12:59 pm
 

Red Sox bullpen gets shakeup

By Matt Snyder

After an extended workload Wednesday night, due to a rain delay and extra innings, the Red Sox bullpen is in need of some fresh faces. They're going to get two, as Rich Hill and Scott Atchison have both been promoted from Triple-A to join the 'pen. They will replace Dan Wheeler and Bobby Jenks, both of whom were placed on the disabled list Thursday morning, general manager Theo Epstein announced.

The move shouldn't really harm the Red Sox, considering how awful both Wheeler and Jenks have been thus far. Jenks has a 9.35 ERA with 13 hits and nine walks allowed in just 8 2/3 innings. For good measure, he's even tossed in three wild pitches. He was unavailable during Wednesday's marathon, so maybe he just hasn't been healthy all season. Wheeler has an 11.32 ERA. His issue is complete opposite of Jenks, as he's been pounded with the long ball, having given up four home runs in 10 1/3 innings.

On the flip-side, Hill and Atchison have been tearing up Triple-A. Hill has a 1.13 ERA with 18 strikeouts and five walks in 16 innings while Atchison has a 1.04 ERA with 17 strikeouts and just one walk in 17 1/3 innings. Things will be more balanced, too, as Hill is left-handed (both Jenks and Wheeler are righties).

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: April 30, 2011 1:22 am
 

3 up, 3 down: Walk-off slam

Carlos Santana
By C. Trent Rosecrans

3UP

Carlos Santana, Indians -- With the game tied in the bottom of the ninth with one out and the bases loaded, Santana only need a fly ball to win the game for the Indians. He hit a fly ball all right, one that went 352 feet into the stands in right field for the walk-off grand slam.

Jarrod Dyson, Royals -- Dyson didn't even have a plate appearance, but his speed was the difference in the Royals' Friday night 5-4 victory over the Twins. Dyson entered the game as a pinch-runner in the eighth inning and immediately made a difference. He stole second, and when Drew Butera's throw went into center field, Wilson Betemit scored from third and Dyson went to third. With one out, Yunel Escobar hit a soft liner to shallow left field, which Twins shortstop Alexi Casilla caught, but Dyson tagged up and beat the throw home easily, scoring the winning run.

Jason Vargas, Mariners -- Seattle's left-hander broke a 13-game winless streak by pitching seven innings in Boston on Friday. Varagas allowed four runs on eight hits and two walks, while Seattle won its fourth straight game in its six-game road trip.

3DOWN

Travis Wood, Reds -- With Johnny Cueto and Homer Bailey getting close to returning to the Reds' rotation, left-hander Travis Wood may have been pitching for his big-league life on Friday. How'd that go? Well, Louisville's nice this time of year. Wood allowed five first-inning runs to the Marlins in Cincinnati's 7-6 loss to Florida. Wood lasted 3 1/3 innings, allowing seven runs on eight hits with two walks and three strikeouts.

David Price, Rays -- Allowed a career-high 12 hits in just 4 1/3 innings in an 8-5 loss to the Angels. Price allowed five runs and walked one, striking out four. Angels rookie first baseman had an RBI single and a two-run homer off of Price, 

Bobby Jenks, Red Sox -- The former White Sox closer gave up a walk, a single and a pair of doubles to Chone Figgins and Jack Cust to pick up the loss for the Red Sox. Jenks has allowed nine runs, eight earned, in his last 4 1/3 innings.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: April 16, 2011 1:18 am
 

3 up, 3 down for 4/15: Charlie in charge

By Matt Snyder

3UP

Charlie Morton, Pirates. He was one out away from a shutout of the Reds at Great American Ball Park. Jay Bruce homered, but that didn't stop Morton from finishing the complete-game gem. He only gave up five hits and two walks while suffocating a pretty solid offense (granted, Brandon Phillips was out). He entered the game with a 2.08 ERA, but had walked 10 hitters with only three strikeouts. Friday, Morton improved significantly, striking out three to those two walks.

Justin Masterson, Indians. That ERA now reads 1.33. Masterson held down the Orioles through seven innings, only giving up four hits and a run. He has been absolutely brilliant thus far in 2011, as has his team. The Indians are 9-4 and tied for first with the Royals (what is this, the bizarro AL Central?).

Cardinals offense. Lance Berkman was supposed to be cooked, instead he's hit six home runs this week, after his two-HR night Friday. Albert Pujols was scuffling a bit to open to the season, but everyone with a brain knew it was only a matter of time. Well, that time has arrived. He's hit three homers in his past two games, including two Friday night. Colby Rasmus, Yadier Molina, David Freese and Matt Holliday are raking and the Cardinals are now the first team since the 2000 Tigers to collect at least 15 hits in four straight games. During that span, they've scored 43 runs.

3DOWN

Bobby Jenks, Red Sox. Pretty disgusting outing for the big man. It reads: walk, single, strikeout, single, single, single -- with a stolen base and wild pitch intertwined. He left with just 1/3 of an inning worked while having allowed four runs. The 2-10 Red Sox lost by one. But don't take my word for how bad Jenks was, you can get it straight from the horse's mouth: "I flat out stunk tonight." (Boston Herald )

Nick Blackburn, Twins. It still amazes me how quickly he nailed down a rotation spot in the spring while Kevin Slowey was sent to the bullpen. But we're past that now. Friday night, against a Rays lineup with Matt Joyce and Felipe Lopez making up the 3-4 hitters, Blackburn was shelled. He coughed up 10 hits and five earned runs in six innings, as the Twins fell to 4-9.

Erik Bedard, Mariners. I'm glad he's healthy, because no one should wish all the rehab he's gone through the past few years on anyone. Still, Bedard is clearly struggling to work back to form. He needed 106 pitches just to get through 4 2/3 innings, while giving up seven hits, three walks and four earned runs. This was against a Royals lineup sans Alex Gordon and Wilson Betemit (before you laugh, check out their numbers thus far).

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com