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Tag:Bobby Valentine
Posted on: March 6, 2012 12:07 pm
 

Carlos Silva out of Red Sox fifth starter fight

Carlos SilvaBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Carlos Silva, a longshot anyway, is out of the competition for the Red Sox fifth starter. The 32-year-old right-hander won't be able to make his scheduled Wednesday start because of shoulder inflammation.

Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine told reporters that Silva will be sidelined long enough to keep him out of running, leaving Vicente Padilla, Aaron Cook, Andrew Miller, Felix Doubront and Alfredo Aceves for the spot.

Boston won't need a fifth starter until the sixth game of the season, in Toronto on April 11.

Valentine said Silva's arm trouble wasn't exactly a surprise.

"We know exactly what it is and we were hoping it wouldn't present itself as qucikly as it did," Valentine told reporters (Providence Journal).

The Cubs released Silva in spring training last season after going 10-6 with a 4.22 ERA in 2010. He signed with the Yankees last April, but was released after seven starts in the minor leagues. He went 2-1 with a 2.75 ERA at Class A, Double-A and Triple-A. He made four starts at Triple-A where he had a 3.52 ERA and struck out 13 in 23 innings, while giving up 21 hits and four walks.

Right-hander Justin Germano will make the start for the Red Sox against the Blue Jays on Wednesday.

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Posted on: March 3, 2012 2:48 pm
 

Ortiz, Gonzalez experiment could happen again

By Matt Snyder

The experiment lasted a mere 13 innings last season. Adrian Gonzalez made two starts and played 13 innings in right field for the Red Sox during interleague play, in order to get David Ortiz into the lineup at first base -- where he also appeared in just 13 innings.

At the time, both sluggers joked about their defensive "prowess" in the unfamiliar positions.

"I told [second baseman Dustin Pedroia], 'Anything up there [in the air] is yours ... and anything on the ground is yours, too,'" Ortiz said (via Danny Knobler's blog last season). "I just have to make sure I catch the balls they throw to me."

"[Pedroia] is going to have to cover first base and right field," Gonzalez said (Knobler blog).

Fast-forward to this spring, and new manager Bobby Valentine appears serious about getting the two more comfortable. In an exhibition game Saturday night, Ortiz will start at first. Sunday, Gonzalez is scheduled to workout in right.

“Right now, (Ortiz) is conditioned to do it,” Valentine said (BostonHerald.com). “If, in fact, during the interleague play, it’s determined that he should play in the field, I think he should have these reps on his resume so that he feels that he’s done it before this year and that he can do it again. This isn’t just to get his at-bats. This is because I’ve talked with him and Adrian and there might be a situation during the year where he’s going to be a first baseman.”

So it doesn't sound like Valentine is pushing for this to be a full-time situation during interleague play, but it's definitely on the table again.

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Posted on: February 29, 2012 6:28 pm
 

A-Rod, Jeter take high road against Bobby V.

Alex RodriguezBy C. Trent Rosecrans

On Tuesday new Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine took two little barbs at the Yankees' Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez. Wednesday, the two Yankees took the high road when asked about Valentine's comments.

"I'm not going to win many battles here when it comes to words, especially against Bobby," Rodriguez told reporters, including the Associated Press.

Jeter said he was "indifferent" about Valentine's comments about his famous flip in the 2001 ALDS against the A's.

"Why are we talking about this, really?" Jeter told the AP. "He must be bored over there, huh? I don't understand."

He added what was a really good question -- "What do you want me to say? I mean, really. What am I supposed to say?"

Valentine did  back off of his statement that he dind't believe the Yankees practiced that play after talking to Red Sox bullpen coach Gary Tuck, who used to be a Yankees catching instructor.

"He said they do practice it. Total mistake on my part because they do practice it, that's for sure," Valentine told the AP. "It's hard to practice that because why are we going to practice a bad throw? That's not what we're doing here. But I get it. I get it. ... I want it on record that I love Derek Jeter as a player. It was not a slight towards him. I love him as a guy, too."

The Yankees actually practiced the play on Wednesday, which may or may not have been a coincidence.

"Ever since I've been here -- in 1996 -- we've asked our shortstops to kind of float in the infield," New York manager Joe Girardi said to the AP and other reporters. "We worked on it today. It happened to be cuts-and-relays day today."

And then there's Eric Chavez, the current Yankees and former Athletic, who had his own opinion about Jeter's famoous play to get Jeremy Giambi at the plate.

"I thought he was safe anyway," Chavez said, according to the AP.

As for Valentine, Jeter said he was "indifferent" and that he didn't know Valentine well enough to know what he was doing.

It should be noted that since Valentine started talking about the Yankees, he's not had to talk about the chicken and beer collapse of 2011, so maybe that had something to do with it.

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Posted on: February 27, 2012 2:52 pm
Edited on: February 27, 2012 3:25 pm
 

Bobby V. fires back at Terry Francona

Bobby Valentine

By C. Trent Rosecrans


Well, earlier Monday former Red Sox manager Terry Francona said the Red Sox ban on alcohol in the clubhouse was a "PR move." Current Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine didn't give a "PR" or "PC" response.

"Remember," Valentine told reporters, including the Boston Herald's Scott Lauber, "you're getting paid over there for saying stuff. You get paid over here for doing stuff. I've done both."

It should be noted, Francona's done both too -- and has two more rings than Valentine.

Valentine continued -- "How was it PR?" he asked. "It means like 20 teams are looking for PR and that's why they're making good decisions."

Valentine did say he had the same rule in his last big-league managerial job with the Mets.

With ESPN's penchant to overblow everything Red Sox and Francona on its payroll, it's safe to say this won't be the last time Francona is asked about a Boston controversy -- and Valentine will object to whatever is said. Valentine is always entertaining, and with Francona in his new gig and a microscope on both, there should be plenty of fun for onlookers this season.

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Posted on: February 27, 2012 11:10 am
 

Francona says Boston's beer ban 'a PR move'

Terry FranconaBy C. Trent Rosecrans

As an analyst at ESPN, former Red Sox manager Terry Francona is in a bit of an awkward spot when asked about his former team -- especially Monday when he was asked about Bobby Valentine's new ban on alcohol in the team's clubhouse.

Appearing on ESPN Radio's "Mike and Mike in the Morning" show (via ESPN), Francona said he wasn't surprised the new manager nixed postgame beers after last season's late-season collapse that was blamed, in part, to starting pitchers drinking beer and eating fried chicken in the clubhouse during games.

"I don't think it's a surprise that they put this in effect, or the fact they announced it," Francona said on Monday. "It's probably more of a PR move just because, you know, the Red Sox [took] such a beating at the end of the year."

He's right, it's mostly a PR move -- but one that probably had to happen. Francona also said he wasn't sure it would curb players drinking.

"I think if a guy wants a beer, he can probably get one," Francona said. "You know, it's kind of the old rule … If your coach in football says no hard liquor on the plane -- I mean, you serve beer and wine -- somebody's going to sneak liquor on the plane. If you furnish a little bit, it almost keeps it to a minimum."

Francona, though, stopped short of criticizing Valentine's decision.

"You look back at this, these are guys that earned my implicit trust," Francona said. "You know, guys that we had won World Series with.

"So I probably felt different about it than a new guy coming in. And he certainly has the right to do what he wants, because he is new, and that's why you get different people."

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Posted on: February 25, 2012 3:16 pm
Edited on: February 25, 2012 4:53 pm
 

Red Sox ban alcohol in the clubhouse

Bobby Valentine

By C. Trent Rosecrans


There'll be no beer in the Red Sox clubhouse this season, but fried chicken is presumably safe.

New manager Bobby Valentine told reporters on Saturday that he told the team alcohol would not be permitted in the clubhouse.

"The rules are not to embarrass themselves or the team, the community, their teammates," Valentine said (via WEEI.com). "I don't think that's a new rule. That's a longstanding rule of life. There's no beer in the clubhouse or on the last leg of road trips."

Valentine said he didn't allow alcohol in the clubhouse when he managed the Mets.

Boston's September collapse was symbolized by starting pitchers drinking beer and eating fried chicken in the clubhouse during games.

Red Sox DH David Ortiz said he supported Valentine's new policy.

"We're not here to drink. We're here to play baseball," David Ortiz said (via the Boston Herald). "It ain't no bar."

Valentine noted 19 other teams don't allow alcohol in the clubhouse, including the Mets, Yankees and Cardinals. St. Louis banned alcohol in the clubhouse after the 2007 death of pitcher Josh Hancock.

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Posted on: February 22, 2012 5:38 pm
 

If no Varitek, there'll be no 'C' in Boston

Jason Varitek

By C. Trent Rosecrans


Jason Varitek has served as the team's captain since 2005, but if he doesn't return -- and it doesn't look like he will -- the Red Sox will go sans an official captain.

"If Varitek doesn't show up? I hadn't planned on [a captain]," new manager Bobby Valentine told reporters (via MLB.com). "If the team thinks a captain's a cool thing, I think that could be considered. It's not that I don't think a captain's necessary. Then again, I don't know that it's so necessary you can't live without it. Who was the captain last year in St. Louis? They didn't have one. So you can win a world championship without a captain."

With Tim Wakefield and (probably) Varitek gone, David Ortiz will be the longest tenured Red Sox, but it doesn't sound like he has any interest in donning the C.

"It's not my job to walk on anyone," Ortiz said Wednesday (via MLB.com). "I'm just an employee, just like anyone else. I'm not a babysitter or anything like that. I'm talking to another man just like me. There's a difference between being a team leader and being a babysitter."

Valentine and Ortiz are probably right, there's no real need for a captain in baseball. The only place it's mentioned in the official rules says an error in a team's lineup should be brought to the attention of the team's manager or captain.

The only two official captains in baseball are the Yankees' Derek Jeter and Paul Konerko of the White Sox, neither of whom wear a "C" patch on their uniform.

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Posted on: February 20, 2012 6:42 pm
Edited on: February 20, 2012 8:49 pm
 

Crawford surpises Valentine, aims for opening day

By Matt Snyder

Just a few days ago, Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine said he expected left fielder Carl Crawford to miss a few weeks to start the 2012 season. Crawford had surgery on his left wrist a month ago, so having him miss some time wouldn't be altogether shocking. Monday, however, Crawford surprised his new manager, who may have spoken too soon late last week.

"I didn't know (Carl) was there," Valentine said (ESPN Boston). "I walked around the corner and he was throwing the ball. It was great to see him. His health looks much better than I expected. (I was) pleasantly surprised."

And Crawford doesn't want to miss any games.

"I definitely don't want to miss any games. That's my goal right now."' said Crawford (ESPN Boston), noting that the odds of him being in the opening-day lineup are good.

After signing a seven-year, $142 million contract, the four-time All-Star hit .255/.289/.405 with just 65 runs and 18 steals. In 2010 for the Rays, Crawford hit .307/.356/.495 with 13 triples, 19 homers, 110 runs, 90 RBI and 47 stolen bases.

If Crawford does miss time, Cody Ross and Ryan Sweeney would man the corner outfield spots, flanking center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury. If all goes as planned for Crawford, though, Ross and Sweeney will be battling for the right field job from the outset.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com