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Tag:Burke Badenhop
Posted on: December 14, 2011 10:38 am
Edited on: December 15, 2011 7:15 pm
 

Homegrown Team: Detroit Tigers



By Matt Snyder


What if players were only permitted to stay with the team that originally made them a professional? No trades, no Rule-5 Draft, no minor or major league free agency ... once you are a professional baseball player, you stay in that organization. This series shows how all 30 teams would look. We give you: Homegrown teams. To view the schedule/past entries of this feature, click here.

For today's installment of the Homegrown series, I can't stop thinking about a certain trade. Earlier this week, I was reminded of the deal anyway. In a pretty minor move, the Rays traded for relief pitcher Burke Badenhop. That's worth discussing here because he was the last standing of six players Tigers general manager Dave Dombrowski sent to the Marlins for Miguel Cabrera (and Dontrelle Willis, for that matter). To acquire one of the biggest superstars in baseball -- and a now-washed up pitcher -- Dombrowski dealt Badenhop, Cameron Maybin, Andrew Miller, Eulogio De La Cruz, Dallas Trahern and Mike Rabelo. Upon Badenhop being dealt, the Marlins now have nothing left to show for the 28-year-old Cabrera. Trahern is stuck in Double-A and appears unlikely to help the big-league club, either.

So, yeah, this homegrown club is missing a huge bat in the middle of the order. But this is also an opportunity to praise Dombrowski for one hell of a trade.

Lineup

1. Omar Infante, SS
2. Matt Joyce, RF
3. Curtis Granderson, CF
4. Brennan Boesch, 1B
5. Alex Avila, C
6. Cody Ross, DH
7. Jack Hannahan, 3B
8. Cameron Maybin, LF
9. Ramon Santiago, 2B

Starting Rotation

1. Justin Verlander
2. Jair Jurrjens
3. Rick Porcello
4. Guillermo Moscoso
5. Charlie Furbush

Bullpen

Closer - Francisco Cordero
Set up - Fernando Rodney, Joel Zumaya, Jason Frasor, Burke Badenhop, Ryan Perry
Long - Andrew Miller

Notable Bench Players

Will Rhymes, Ryan Raburn, Scott Sizemore, Danny Worth, Brandon Inge, Andy Dirks, Don Kelly, Casper Wells, Andres Torres

What's Good?

That guy sitting atop the starting rotation is pretty decent, no? Getting 34 or so starts out of Justin Verlander gives this ballclub a great chance to win plenty of low-scoring games. Jurrjens is a fine number two as well. I love Avila behind the plate and Maybin in left field would be a defensive force -- most metrics showed Maybin as a far superior defender in center to Granderson this past season, but I went with the logic that Granderson would stay in center as the star of the team. If he wanted to pull a Cal Ripken and move, OK, the defense gets even better. Finally, the bench depth is pretty good, as there are several guys capable of providing good spot starts.

What's Not?

While it's definitely not awful, that batting order leaves a lot to be desired. Joyce is really good and Granderson is great. Otherwise? I'll channel my inner Larry David and just say "eh." There would be an awful lot of pressure on Boesch and Avila in those run producing spots, that's for sure. Also, while it's not horrible, that bullpen bridge to Cordero isn't exactly one that eases the mind. Can you imagine how many cigarettes Jim Leyland would have to choke down to stomach a night with Badenhop, Frasor and Rodney tasked with putting up zeroes? They can do it, but they'll just about give you a heart attack in the process.

Comparison to real 2011

I'll go out on a limb here (please note sarcasm) and say winning 95 games and cruising to the AL Central title is about as realistic with this group as this exercise. A winning record might be possible, as this team feels just mediocre. The likes of Verlander, Granderson, Avila, Joyce and Jurrjens keep them away from "suck" territory. I'd go high-70s in wins with a ceiling of 83 victories.

Next: Houston Astros

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Posted on: December 12, 2011 7:05 pm
Edited on: December 12, 2011 7:24 pm
 

Burke Badenhop traded to Rays

By Matt Snyder

The two teams from Florida have completed a trade, sending right-handed reliever Burke Badenhop from Miami to Tampa Bay, the Rays announced on Twitter. The Marlins get minor-league catcher Jake Jefferies in return.

Hot Stove Season
The move feels vintage Andrew Friedman, the Rays' executive who seems to have a knack for grabbing relievers on the cheap and having them come through with a good season. Kyle Farnsworth last season is a great example, just as Joaquin Benoit (2010) and several others have been in the past four years.

Badenhop, 28, had a 4.10 ERA and 1.40 WHIP in 63 2/3 innings last season for the Marlins. Sabermetric stats showed he pitched much better than those numbers and suffered from bad fortune. His FIP was 2.95 and BABIP allowed was a high .327. So if things regress to the norm, Badenhop's numbers will come down.

Also, he is very cheap. He'll likely make between $1 million and $2 million bucks through arbitration each of the next two seasons before hitting free agency.

Jefferies, 24, hit just .238/.282/.327 with two home runs in 242 plate appearances between High-A and Double-A. He was a third round pick in the 2008 draft.

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Posted on: May 17, 2011 1:54 am
 

3 up, 3 down: Believe in 'The Hopper'



By Matt Snyder


First things first, big ups to the Cleveland Indians for scoring 19 runs in a game. That's quire impressive. You won't find them included here, because I wanted to spread the love a bit.

Burke Badenhop, Marlins. The unheralded -- yet effective -- middle reliever put himself in the spotlight late Monday night with a bat in his hands. After throwin a scoreless 10th inning, Badenhop was left in to bat with runners on first and second (backup shortstop Ozzie Martinez was available to pinch hit, too). He swung at ball three with a 2-1 count, but worked the count full. On the payoff pitch, Badenhop laced a single to center that plated Mike Stanton for the go-ahead run. The Marlins would hold on, 2-1, despite fellow pitcher Jonathon Niese tripling in the bottom half of the 11th. Needless to say, it was quite the wacky night at Citi Field -- but the end result was the Marlins moving to within a game of the Phillies in the NL East.

Colby Lewis, Rangers. The White Sox were returning home after a successful road trip that saw them win six of their last eight. Manager Ozzie Guillen promised the fans his team would make it up to the fans for having not had home success earlier in the season. Lewis had other ideas, as he spun his first career shutout. He only allowed five hits and a walk while striking out seven.

Rockies' offense. The Rox entered Monday night 9-16 since their 11-2 start. They hadn't won a series since April 26 and were 3-9 in their last 12. And they were facing Tim Lincecum. After being shut down for four innings by Lincecum, the Rockies' bats woke up in a big way. Carlos Gonzalez came through with the big blow -- a three-run home run that drove Lincecum from the game. The final line for the two-time Cy Young winner was: 5 2/3 innings, nine hits, six walks, two home runs (Seth Smith with the other) and seven runs (only three earned). That's gotta build some confidence in the Rockies' clubhouse and could possibly get them right back on track.




Joaquin Benoit, Tigers. Max Scherzer was brilliant again for the Tigers, working seven solid innings against a hot Blue Jays offense and lowering his ERA to 2.81. The game was tied at one entering the eighth, but Benoit pitched the Tigers right out of the game by allowing three runs on four hits. That means he's given up 16 hits and 12 earned runs in his past six outings -- spanning just five innings.

The New York Yankees. With all the soap opera stuff involving Jorge Posada, Derek Jeter, Rafael Soriano and the entire front office, it's getting to be a bit much. Oh, and the Yanks have now lost six games in a row for the first time under Joe Girardi. Monday night, they built a 5-1 lead off Rays' ace David Price only to blow it and lose 6-5. They're now in a virtual tie with the Red Sox and Blue Jays and closer to last place than first.

Orioles' bullpen. Chris Tillman left with a 6-0 lead, but over the following four innings, the Orioles would unsuccessfully use six relievers. Mike Gonzalez gave up four runs (though only one was earned). Jeremy Accardo was charged with two hits and one earned run. Clay Rapada got an out, but walked the only other batter he faced. Jim Johnson allowed three hits and a run in his inning of work. Koji Uehara allowed a hit and walk in his inning, though he did get through it with a zero on the scoreboard. Last, and certainly least, closer Kevin Gregg coughed up the game in the ninth when he walked Jacoby Ellsbury and Dustin Pedroia before Adrian Gonzalez's walk-off two-RBI double.

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Posted on: February 24, 2011 11:34 am
Edited on: February 24, 2011 3:49 pm
 

Honorary All-Grudzielanek team

Mark Grudzielanek played in 1,802 games over the course of 15 major-league seasons. He appeared in uniform for six different teams, making the NLCS twice -- once with the Cubs and once with the Cardinals. He hit .289 with over 2,000 hits and 946 runs scored. He earned one Gold Glove and made the All-Star team once. He was a good guy who always played hard and was generally liked by teammates. Basically, Grudzielanek had a quality major-league career, but won't be showing up on any all-time lists.

That is, unless you are looking squarely at that stupendous last name.

So, in light of his retirement announcement Wednesday, it only seems fitting to put together an All-Star team of the best names in baseball. We're looking for who will carry the torch on with Grudz's departure, so it's current players only. No real criteria, other than that the name just has to sound interesting or be really hard to spell -- or both. This is completely subjective, so there's definite room for argument.

Without further ado, here is the 25-man roster (we also listed all names we considered).

CATCHER: Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Red Sox. And here's the team captain. There's no better name in baseball. Backup: J.P. Arencibia, Blue Jays. Also considered: Francisco Cervelli, Yankees; Taylor Teagarden, Rangers.

FIRST BASE: Pablo Sandoval, Giants. Bonus points for having an awesome nickname. Backup: Kila Ka'aihue, Royals. Also considered: Justin Smoak, Mariners

SECOND BASE: Chone Figgins, Mariners. Real slim pickings here. Nearly every name for a second basemen is bland or common. We'll go with Figgins because "Chone" is pronounced "Sean" or "Shaun" or "Shawn." Also considered: Robinson Cano, Yankees; Dan Uggla, Braves.

THIRD BASE: Kevin Kouzmanoff, A's. Also considered: Placido Polanco, Phillies.

SHORTSTOP:
Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies. Alliteration gets him the nod here. Backup: Yuniesky Betancourt. Also considered: Marco Scutaro, Red Sox; Ryan Theriot, Cardinals.

LEFT FIELD: Scott Podsednik, Blue Jays. Also considered: Chris Coghlan, Marlins; Chris Denorfia, Padres; Ryan Langerhans, Mariners.

CENTER FIELD: Coco Crisp, A's. Another no-brainer. Second easiest pick on here after Saltalamacchia. Backup: Colby Rasmus, Cardinals. Also considered: Nyjer Morgan, Nationals; Rajai Davis, Blue Jays; Cameron Maybin, Padres; Denard Span, Twins; Ryan Spilborghs, Rockies.

RIGHT FIELD: Brennan Boesch, Tigers. Tough call here, but I'm a sucker for the alliteration. Plus, that's just a smooth combo. Props to his parents. Also considered: Jeff Francoeur, Royals; Nate Schierholtz, Giants; Nick Markakis, Orioles.

DESIGNATED HITTER: Milton Bradley, Mariners. Personal feelings aside, this was another obvious one.

STARTING ROTATION: CC Sabathia, Yankees; Max Scherzer, Tigers; Brian Matusz, Orioles; Marc Rzepczynski, Blue Jays; Justin Duchscherer, Orioles. CC gets the nod due to his first name being Carsten. Oh, and for losing the periods to his initials. The other four are pretty obvious with those last names. Grudz is surely proud. Also considered: Bronson Arroyo, Reds; Tim Lincecum, Giants; Madison Bumgarner, Giants; Gio Gonzalez, A's; Tom Gorzelanny, Nationals.

BULLPEN: Octavio Dotel, Blue Jays; Jeff Samardzija, Cubs; Fu-Te Ni, Tigers; Boof Bonser, Mets; Burke Badenhop, Marlins. All pretty obvious great names here, and I especially love "The Hopper," as the Marlins' announcers call Badenhop. Also considered: Brian Duensing, Twins; Joba Chamberlain, Yankees; Jeremy Affeldt, Giants; Jason Isringhausen, Mets.

SETUP: David Aardsma, Mariners. Based mostly on the fact that if you listed every major league player of all-time alphabetically, only Aardsma would come before the great Hank Aaron.

CLOSER: J.J. Putz, Diamondbacks. C'mon. He uses a double initial and his last name looks like an insult (though it's actually pronounced "puts," not "putts," for those in the dark).

MANAGER: Mike Scioscia, Angels. Maybe it's all mental at this point, but spelling that thing correctly still trips me up. Give me Grudzielanek any day. Also considered: Mike Quade, Cubs; Ned Yost, Royals; Manny Acta, Indians.

-- Matt Snyder

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Posted on: February 21, 2011 10:38 am
Edited on: February 21, 2011 10:39 am
 

Morning Pepper: The next indy-ball major leaguer?

De La Rosa

NEVER GONNA GIVE YOU UP: Dane De La Rosa's eventual destination of Port Charlotte took years to accomlpish, but the 28-year-old finally arrived after flaming out of the Yankees organization, selling real estate and playing independent baseball for four seasons.

"It's a great feel-good story," Rays director of minor-league operations Mitch Lukevics said of De La Rosa and his path back to relevancy that has him poised to follow in the footsteps of Scott Richmond and Robert Coello as ex-indy players who fight their way to the majors. But first, De La Rosa had some growing up to do.

"I felt like I belonged there, which is not the mindset you need to have when you're there," De La Rosa said of his time in New York in which he appeared in just 20 games over the 2003-04 season. "You need to be humbled. Going through all this has made me a humble person, so I don't regret it at all."

De La Rosa headed to independent baseball after the Yankees cut him, but he struggled to adjust and then took a year off to sell real estate. However, his dream wouldn't die and he couldn't handle knowing his baseball career was over, so he returned to the independent leagues.  His play in 2007 got him a late-season pickup by the Brewers, but all he got was one two-inning stint at the rookie level before being released.

But after two more years in the independent leagues, De La Rosa finally caught the attention of the Rays, who brought him in for a workout. Tampa witnessed a 6-foot-5 righty with a fastball reaching 97-mph and immediately signed him.

"He was pounding fastballs, and we were thinking this is too good to be true," Lukevics said. De La Rosa would go on to split the year between high-Class A and Double-A, posting a 2.01 ERA in 76 innings and whiffing 80 while coughing up 26 walks. Now, he has a chance to win a bullpen spot in the major leagues after being placed on the 40-man roster, news that came just weeks after becoming engaged. That's a lesson in the art of perseverance.

"If Dane De La Rosa has taken this journey and now he's on the 40-man major-league roster and a heartbeat away from pitching in the big leagues," Lukevics said, "it tells every young man, every player they have a chance if they keep working." (Tampa Tribune, also source of photo)

PARTY TIME: Brian Wilson is sure one lucky guy. He was picked up in Arizona by none other than Charlie Sheen on a private jet and ferried to Sheen's house, where he hosted yet another party. This one was full of ballplayers watching movies and kicking back. (And yes, Sheen's iconic Major League was played, capping off the night.) Sources said the party was only "R-rated" instead of the debauchery that usually happens at the Sheen estate.

No word on whether Wilson's virtual doppleganger attended the festivities. (TMZ)

A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME: Pete Rose joined a fundraiser for a Legion team and had plenty of jokes to crack even as there was the requisite talk about Rose's gambling and Hall of Fame chances. "This is America. You're supposed to get second chances," Rose said. "I chose the wrong vice." Or maybe his second chance was frittered away when he lied about gambling? Anyways, cool anecdote: Rose would always leave four tickets per game for his father, who would move seats every time Rose didn't get a hit. One day when Rose went 0-for-4 and didn't hustle (imagine that) on a grounder to second, his father castigated him.

"He asked me, 'Did you run hard in your third at-bat with the runner on third?'" Rose relayed. "I thought about it and I realized I hadn't because I thought I should've gotten a hit, and I grounded out to second."

His father's response: "'Don't embarrass me in this town. You run until the umpire says safe or out.'" (Oroville Mercury-Register)

LONG TIME NO SEE: When the Pirates traded Jason Schmidt back in 2001, they were hoping the return would put them on the path to respectability. Instead, Armando Rios got hurt and Ryan Vogelsong posted a 6.00 ERA from 2001-06 after rocketing through the Giants' system. But now, Vogelsong is finally back in San Francisco after stints in Japan and Triple-A for the Phillies and Angels last season. 

Before Vogelsong picked the Giants, the Dodgers came calling, but the righty stayed true to his roots. "I was like, I just can't wear Dodger blue," he said. (MLB.com)

PRIDE COMES BEFORE A FALL: Edgar Renteria isn't upset that the Giants declined his $10.5 miliion option (an obvious move, he says) but the resulting $1 million offer was disrespectful, he says. "I'm not going to play for anybody for $1 million," Renteria said. "I'd rather retire. That is why I say it [was disrespectful]. It's because I know what I can do in this game."

Renteria eventually signed for $2.1 million with the Reds. Meanwhile, if being offered $1 million is disrespectful, sign me up. (San Jose Mercury News)

REST IN PEACE: Cardinals co-owner Andrew Baur has passed away at the tender age of 66. He was a part of the 1996 purchase of the Cardinals by majority owner Bill DeWitt and was a member of the board of directors since the ownership change. Cause of death is not yet known. (FOX Sports Midwest)

LITERARY GENIUS: In Sunday's Morning Pepper, R.A. Dickey revealed he was writing a book about his major-league career. It's not often you hear of ballplayers who can write -- nevermind even read -- but add Burke Badenhop to that list. The Marlin relayed a story of the judge recognizing him when he served jury duty, but that was only the start of his offseason. He also got married, assisted a friend in writing a book about financial planning and is co-writing a movie script with his agent. But now, all he's concerned about is winning a bullpen spot. (Palm Beach Post)

DHING AIN'T EASY: DHs don't get a lot of respect in the league. Not only is it virtually impossible for them to get Hall of Fame or All-Star consideration, but many believe it's pretty easy to walk up to the plate four times a game, take your hacks and then warm the bench without having to play defense. Not so, and Adam Dunn is trying to figure out how to transition to a DH role. Fortunately, ex-White Sox players in Jim Thome and Harold Baines have some advice. (Chicago Tribune)

LESSON LEARNED: It couldn't have been easy for Mike Quade to step into Lou Piniella's shoes and then make the move of benching Starlin Castro for one game, but there you have it. The budding shortstop rode the pine for a mental lapse, and the Rookie of the Year candidate has said he learned his lesson from it. Quade, however, refuses to call it discipline, rather preferring to term it a "teaching moment" to get Castro a breather after breaking into the bigs amid much hoopla and starting on a regular basis. (Chicago Tribune)

-- Evan Brunell

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Posted on: November 13, 2010 7:31 pm
Edited on: November 13, 2010 7:34 pm
 

Looking back at Marlins-Tigers blockbuster


Apparently the Marlins are trying to exorcize the demons of a 2007 trade in one fell swoop.

They have confirmed their trade today of outfielder Cameron Maybin to the Padres, a day after they traded pitcher Andrew Miller to the Red Sox. Maybin and Miller were the two major prospects Florida got back on December 4, 2007, when they sent Miguel Cabrera and Dontrelle Willis to the Tigers.

Going into the winter meetings, there was talk the Marlins could be looking to deal one of their stars, knowing they wouldn't be able to afford to keep them in free agency. But few expected both of them to move, and nobody anticipated both of them going to the same team in one deal. And the Tigers hadn't been considered a front-line option for either.

The Angels came close to getting Cabrera. They hit an impasse with the Angels offering Howie Kendrick and Jeff Mathis, plus a choice of one of three starting pitchers: Ervin Santana, Joe Saunders and Nick Adenhart. The Marlins wanted two of the three, and the deal broke down. Think throwing in Willis might have enabled them to get both Santana and Saunders, who have both since been All-Stars and gone 83-56? We'll never know.

What the Marlins did get for Cabrera and Willis was a six-team package of prospects headlined by Detroit's top draft picks from 2005 (Maybin) and 2006 (Wright), plus Dallas Trahern, Burke Badenhop, Eulogio de la Cruz and Mike Rabelo.

Just for fun, let's look at what became (so far) of everyone in that blockbuster:

TO TIGERS

* IF Miguel Cabrera: He was one of the game's best hitters then, and he still is. In three seasons since the trade he has batted .314/.388/.567 with 109 home runs and 356 RBI. Led the league in homers in 2008, and in 2010 led in RBI and on-base percentage.

* LHP Dontrelle Willis: The Marlins definitely sold high on Willis. At the time of the trade he was a two-time All-Star who had won at least 10 games in each of his first five seasons, but his career quickly came off the rails from there. He's started just 27 games in the ensuing three years, going 3-9 with a 6.86 ERA. He was traded to the Diamondbacks, who released him after a month, and is currently in the Giants' minor-league system.

Cameron Maybin TO MARLINS

* OF Cameron Maybin (pictured): Still just 23, the supremely talented Maybin hasn't hit his stride, in part because the Marlins didn't handle him very well. Since the trade, he's got 557 plate appearances, roughly the equivalent of a full season, and a line of .257/.323/.391 with 12 homers, 43 RBI and 14 steals. He's a serviceable major-league player, but not yet the star he was projected to be.

* LHP Andrew Miller: The big lefty hasn't figured it out yet, struggling with control and consistency. He's gone 10-20 in the past three years with a 5.89 ERA and found himself out of Florida's plans this year, spending most of the season in the minors.

* RHP Dallas Trahern: Has not appeared in a major-league game. He spent 2008-09 at Triple-A, posting an ERA over 6.00 both years, and missed 2010 after Tommy John surgery.

* RHP Burke Badenhop: Has appeared in 101 games the past three years for the Marlins, including 10 starts and 25 games finished.

* RHP Eulogio de la Cruz: Pitched nine innings for the Tigers in 2008, was sold to the Padres in 2009, and released by the Padres at the end of that season. He played in Japan in 2010.

* C Mike Rabelo: Played a handful of games in Miami in 2008 and played just nine games in 2009 before being released. The Tigers brought him back on a minor-league deal at the start of 2010 and released him in July.

-- David Andriesen

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Posted on: November 4, 2010 4:19 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:32 pm
 

Bruce, O'Day among Super Twos

Brad Ziegler, the right-handed sidearmed reliever, is the lucky winner of the Super Two cutoff date this year with two years, 122 days of service time, according to the list sent to agents by the MLB Players Association. Super Two qualify for salary arbitration early.

The cutoff this season is lower than it has been in recent years, perhaps indicating that teams are getting more and more careful about how soon they bring up players in attempts to put off arbitration as long as possible.

Leading the list is Tampa Bay's Evan Longoria, who has already been signed to a long-term deal, a deal that's looking better and better by the day for the Rays.

Here's the list:

Jay Bruce Player 2009 Club Total Service
Evan Longoria Tampa Bay 2.170
Jim Johnson Baltimore 2.165
Felipe Paulino Houston 2.163
Josh Fields Kansas City 2.159
Kyle Kendrick Philadelphia 2.159
Sean White Seattle 2.156
Ian Stewart Colorado 2.154
Dana Eveland* Pittsburgh 2.152
Luke Hochevar Kansas City 2.151
Armando Galarraga Detroit 2.148
Burke Badenhop Florida 2.143
Ross Ohlendorf Pittsburgh 2.139
Chris Perez Cleveland 2.136
Alberto Gonzalez Washington 2.135
Jensen Lewis Cleveland 2.133
Darren O'Day Texas 2.128
Jay Bruce Cincinnati 2.125
Chase Headley San Diego 2.123
Travis Buck Oakland 2.123
Brad Ziegler Oakland 2.122
*outrighted

It appears that this is the best news for Bruce, O'Day and Perez, who will likely get the biggest bumps in salary from 2010 to 2011.

Of all those players, Bruce (pictured) may have had the best season, hitting .281/.353/.493 with 25 home runs. Perez recorded 23 saves and had a 1.71 ERA as the closer for the Indians once Kerry Wood was sent to the Yankees. O'Day was a valuable member of the Rangers' bullpen, appearing in 72 regular-season games and 11 postseason games. During the Regular season, he had a 2.03 ERA.

All three of those players made $440,000 or less last season.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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Posted on: June 12, 2010 2:54 pm
 

Marlins bullpen might have to make do


Marlins president Larry Beinfest told the Miami Herald he won't rule out trading for relief help, but noted that "with relief needs, it's a competitive environment."

In other words, fans of the team with the third-smallest payroll in the National League shouldn't hold their breath.

The Marlins' bullpen has been shaky, particularly in the middle innings. Florida relievers have a 4.66 ERA, 12th in the NL, and 10 blown saves.

Beinfest said the biggest disappointments have been the failure of Dan Meyer and Burke Badenhop, both now in the minors, and an injury to Renyel Pinto.

"Basically we had three guys that last year were very good and aren't here," Beinfest said. "We'll just keep trying."

-- David Andriesen

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com