Tag:Cesar Izturis
Posted on: December 3, 2011 4:15 pm
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Homegrown Team: Toronto Blue Jays



By C. Trent Rosecrans


What if players were only permitted to stay with the team that originally made them a professional? No trades, no Rule-5 Draft, no minor or major league free agency ... once you are a professional baseball player, you stay in that organization. This series shows how all 30 teams would look. We give you: Homegrown teams. To view the schedule/past entries of this feature, click here.

The American League East is the biggest, baddest division in baseball -- in large part because of the deep pockets of the Yankees and Red Sox, but also because of the drafting and development from the Rays. Somewhere in the middle is the Blue Jays, a team that could be a giant in maybe any other division in baseball. In our exercise, the Blue Jays have an argument as one of the best teams in baseball, largely because of a stout rotation.

Lineup

1. Reed Johnson, CF
2. Aaron Hill, 2B
3. Michael Young, 1B
4. Adam Lind, DH
5. Vernon Wells, LF
6. Alex Rios, RF
7. Ryan Roberts 3B
8. J.P. Arencibia, C
9. Cesar Izturis, SS

Starting Rotation

1. Roy Halladay
2. Chris Carpenter
3. Ricky Romero
4. Shaun Marcum
5. Alfredo Aceves

Bullpen

Closer - Brandon League
Set up - Marc Rzepczynski, Tim Collins, Brandon Lyon, Dustin McGowan, Casey Janssen
Long - Jesse Litsch

Notable Bench Players

Orlando Hudson, Felipe Lopez, Casey Blake, Travis Snider, Eric Thames.

What's Good?

That rotation, are you kidding?

What's Not?

There's Rios and Wells -- two of the most overpaid players in the game. Those two are not just overpaid, they're also not very good. Eric Thames could step in for either one. There are some decent players on the bench, but not a lot of pop.

Comparison to real 2011

The 81-81 season was seen as a step forward for the Blue Jays in 2011, but with this lineup the expectations would be much, much higher. The rotation alone makes this team the favorite in the AL East in our hypothetical. The offense lacks the impact of Jose Bautista, but there's enough to support the pitching staff. Not only is this team better than the real Blue Jays, they have a shot at winning it all.

Next: Colorado Rockies

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Posted on: October 27, 2011 3:05 pm
Edited on: October 27, 2011 3:06 pm
 

Free agent shortstop rankings: High risk, reward



By Matt Snyder

The theme here is high-risk, high-reward guys, at least toward the top. In the top two (and I'd include number four as well) teams are possibly looking at All-Star seasons or an albatross contract down the road, depending on how things shake out with health and the aging process. The entire list here contains gambles, but you know what? Sometimes in gambling you win.

List of MLB free agents

1. Jose Reyes. The 28 year old has now been an All-Star four times. He's led the majors in triples four times and the NL in steals three times. He upped his on-base percentage to .384 (nearly 30 points higher than his previous career high) in 2011 while winning the NL batting title. Had he not injured his hamstring twice, he may have been an MVP candidate. Of course, therein lies the issue. From 2005-08, Reyes was very durable. Since then, he's been unable to shake injuries. Someone is going to give him a big contract, there's little question about that. If Reyes can stay healthy, he'll be worth every dime. If he can't, the contract could end up handcuffing a franchise.
Potential teams: Mets, Tigers (shifting Jhonny Peralta to third), Giants, Nationals, Phillies, Brewers, Mariners

2. Jimmy Rollins. He turns 33 in a month and is actually coming off his best season since 2008. He can still steal bases, can still hit for moderate power and play good defense. He's just not a star anymore, and Rollins seems to be seeking a star-like contract. The hunch is some team that misses out on Reyes gives Rollins three to four years and regrets the deal by the third season, but it's possible he could be a good signing. 
Potential teams: Same as Reyes, Rollins is just the second option.

3. Marco Scutaro. He'll be 36 in less than a week, but he should have enough left in the tank to be a meaningful starter for the next two seasons. He had a .358 OBP in a tough division, so Scutaro could prove a good option for some ballclub that isn't capable of spending big money to fill a hole at short. Of course, they probably won't have a chance, because the Red Sox are expected to pick up Scutaro's option.
Potential teams: Red Sox

4. Rafael Furcal. It seems like Furcal has been around forever, and that's because he was a rookie at the ripe young age of 22. He's 34 now and certainly has lost some speed and power. Plus, he has only been healthy enough to play at least 100 games once in the past four seasons. Furcal has played better since joining the Cardinals, but he still hasn't shown enough to be considered a big name on the free agency market. He has said publicly he wants to remain in St. Louis and a one-year deal there is a distinct possibility.
Potential teams: Cardinals, Twins, Reds, Giants, Brewers, Mariners, Phillies

5. Clint Barmes. Barmes had a decent 2011 season for the Astros, shifting back to being an everyday shortstop -- the position he lost to Troy Tulowitzki in Colorado. He'll be very affordable and the Astros may let him walk, considering that's very little chance for them to compete in the next two seasons. It makes Barmes a nice, cheap option for teams strapped for cash.
Potential teams: Twins, Reds, Braves, Pirates, Giants

6. Willie Bloomquist.
The Diamondbacks will be getting Stephen Drew back from injury, but Bloomquist still has value to the franchise as a sort of supersub -- someone who can be plugged in as an injury replacement anywhere on the field (in 2010 he played every position except pitcher and catcher). The D-Backs are expected to pick up his option.
Potential teams: Diamondbacks

7. Yuniesky Betancourt. He has power, but his inability to get on base (.271 OBP in '11) and awful range at shortstop make Betancourt a liability most games. He did have a great offensive NLCS, so it's possible that lands him a few extra bucks on the open market. It's possible the Brewers pick up Betancourt's option if they can't get one of the above guys, but it's a $6 million option. That's hard to justify for a guy who can't get on base or field very well.
Potential teams: Pirates, Astros, Brewers, Twins, Braves

8. Ronny Cedeno. He's 29 and already shown his upside is severely limited. If the Pirates don't pick up his option, it's hard to see anyone signing him to come in and be the starter, at least not unchallenged.
Potential teams: Astros? Otherwise he'll be a backup just about anywhere.

9. Alex Gonzalez. The veteran will be 35 before next season starts, but he still has some pop. A team looking to bolster the offense's power could give him a one-year deal. There is talk the Braves will end up keeping him, so that bears watching.
Potential teams: Braves, Twins, Giants, Mariners

10. Cesar Izturis. He's only 31, but he's long since shown that he can't be a decent major-league hitter. He can help someone as a backup middle infielder that is only used as a defensive replacement, but his value is minimal. Look for teams with a good offensive shortstop that can't field to see Izturis as a late-innings defensive replacement -- but it can't be a star. Stars don't usually come out of the game.
Potential teams: Blue Jays, Braves, Padres, Rays, Nationals, Brewers, Retirement

11. John McDonald. Very similar to Izturis in that McDonald can play defense but not hit. He's just depth.
Potential teams: Diamondbacks, Blue Jays, Braves, Padres, Rays, Nationals, Brewers

12. Edgar Renteria. Is there a place for an old backup who can barely hit or field anymore, but was once an All-Star and has a penchant for dramatic postseason hits? It's possible. Renteria could realistically be forced into retirement, but the guess is someone gives him a modest one-year deal.
Potential teams: Brewers, Twins, Mariners, Astros, Pirates, Retirement

13. Felipe Lopez. He's a headache off the field and has alienated himself from several ballclubs. He was an All-Star in 2005, when he hit 23 home runs and stole 11 bases, but Lopez hit just .206/.247/.277 in 2011 and he's north of 30 years old. If he gets a chance somewhere, it's gonna be on a minor-league deal.
Potential teams: anyone other than the eight teams he's already played for ... or forced retirement.

14. Orlando Cabrera. The soon-to-be 37 year old can't hit and his defense is drastically declining. With more and more teams ready to go young instead of wasting money on veterans, there is likely to be zero market for Cabrera's services early in the free agency period. It's possible when several of the names above fly off the board that some club grabs Cabrera on the cheap, but he also might end up like Jermaine Dye a few years ago ... just waiting on the right deal that never comes along.
Potential teams: Marlins? Mariners? Brewers? Retirement very possible.

15. Drew Sutton. He hit .315/.362/.444 in 31 games for the Red Sox, but there is little chance of that keeping up in the long run. Sutton is probably more likely to land a job -- for different reasons -- than Cabrera (age), Lopez (personality) or Renteria (asking price), but it's hard to tell who is going to view him as the proper fit to back up their shortstop.
Potential teams: Anyone and everyone.

Other free agents who could play shortstop: Jamey Carroll, Jerry Hairston, Ramon Santiago, Jack Wilson, Nick Punto, Omar Vizquel, Craig Counsell, Alex Cora

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Posted on: May 4, 2011 12:44 pm
Edited on: May 4, 2011 1:09 pm
 

Who could Giants go after for shortstop?

Reyes

By Evan Brunell

The Giants' shortstop crisis has taken another turn toward utter disaster.

With the injuries to Mark DeRosa and Pablo Sandoval, S.F. has thankfully moved a slumping Miguel Tejada to third base, which improves the defense at shortstop even if his bat remains a complete zero. In lieu of Tejada, Mike Fontenot has stepped into the breach, but Fontenot remains a bench infielder with 20 career games experience at short -- seven this year.

Even when DeRosa and Sandoval return, allowing Tejada to slide back to short, the Giants need to find a better replacement, which will have to come via trade. But who?

Jose Reyes: The Mets' Reyes has been a popular link given the shortstop's perceived availability. An impending free agent, Reyes is showing how he can impact a game when healthy, but can the Giants afford both what it would cost in a deal for Reyes, plus what it will cost to retain him? CSNBayArea.com reports that while Reyes' name has been kicked around internally, that's as far as it's gotten so far. Helping matters is that the Mets wouldn't ask for any of the Giants' current starting pitchers, which has constantly eroded trade talks elsewhere. New York would focus on San Francisco's better prospects, like pitcher Zack Wheeler, outfielder Gary Brown or shortstop Ehire Adrianza. 

Problem: The Giants already have a franchise-record payroll in the $120 million range, and Reyes' pro-rated $11 million salary would have to be absorbed with no guarantee of retention after the year. And retention could be a problem, as reports surface that Reyes will ask for a deal similar to Carl Crawford's seven-year, $142 million pact. Without Barry Zito and Aaron Rowand on the team, maybe S.F. could foot the bill, but a deal of that magnitude is likely not feasible. Compounding matters is that GM Brian Sabean will not trade top prospects for a "loaner," as CBSSports.com's Danny Knobler reports. Makes sense, and is the right idea.

ESPN's Buster Olney counters this, saying Reyes could be convinced to stay with a solid multi-year offer. If Reyes agrees to a deal that pays him $15 million, the Giants could find the funds for 2012 by the expiring deals of Tejada, De Rosa and Cody Ross. The team could then start Brandon Belt in right or left-field, with Pat Burrell returning for another year in the outfield or a similar low-cost solution found. Both Aaron Rowand and Aubrey Huff's deals expire after 2012, which would then really free up cash for San Fran, so it's still entirely possible the Giants go after Reyes. Still, it's a big enough stretch financially and what type of talent would have to be surrendered that one has to question if it's the right call.

Marco Scutaro: That could cause the Giants to explore alternatives, and Scutaro is one known to have come up in Giants circles. Scoot is making just $5 million on the year and the Giants would hold a $6 million club option if it wished to keep the infielder around another year. With Jed Lowrie's emergence in Boston, Scutaro is certainly available despite his ability to function as utility infielder. The Red Sox have depth down in Triple-A for that role, so if they can find a fit, would not hesitate to move their 2010 starting shortstop.

The Red Sox wouldn't require a top prospect in return for Scutaro, so a fit could be easier reached. The Red Sox could pursue bullpen options or settle for acquiring a blue-chip prospect. This is the most likely outcome: Scutaro fits the Giants' budget, holds potential 2012 value and has a motivated seller.

Maicer Izturis / Erick Aybar / Alberto Callaspo: The Angels love their infield depth, and it's been a major help so far. Still, if and when Kendrys Morales returns to first base, someone has to hit the bench. That won't be Howie Kendrick, who is currently batting No. 3 in the order and in the process of breaking out. That leaves one of the three mentioned as bench candidates. At that point, the Giants would be interested in one of the three. Aybar is the one whose job appears most secure, although he's the worst hitter to date. Callaspo is in the midst of a hot streak but is falling back to earth and has only 32 games played at short in his career. That leaves Izturis, who is in the middle of his own hot streak and the one who has consistently been the bench player of the group, although it could be Callaspo this season.

But a fit is less clear. The club can't justify asking for one of San Francisco's best starting pitchers and there's no obvious fit on offense. It's tough to imagine the Angels agreeing to trade for a prospect to sacrifice that quality infield depth.

Jack Wilson / Brendan Ryan: When the Mariners finally promote Dustin Ackley to man second, it will relegate a good fielding, no-hit shortstop to the bench. Take your pick in Jack Wilson or Brendan Ryan. Either can easily go, and Seattle wouldn't put up too much of a fuss in the return price. While Marco Scutaro would represent the best investment both from a financial and production perspective, acquiring one of Wilson or Ryan remains the most likely outcome simply because the price would be lower for one of the two. Plus we need the humor of the sad-sack Pirates' double-play combo in Wilson and Sanchez being reunited on the World Series-defending club.

There are other options too, but they're hardly anything to get excited about. Ronny Cedeno, Cesar Izturis, Angel Sanchez, or even a return engagement by Edgar Renteria would fill a gap, but nothing more.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 
Posted on: December 10, 2010 4:49 pm
Edited on: December 10, 2010 4:49 pm
 

Izturis returning to O's

Cesar Izturis
The Orioles gave away his starting shortstop job, but Cesar Izturis will return as a utility player. The Baltimore Sun reports that he has agreed to a one-year, $1.5 million deal, which is pending a physical.

J.J. Hardy, acquired from the Twins, is Baltimore's starting shortstop, and the team also acquired Brendan Harris in that deal. But manager Buck Showalter reportedly likes Izturis, 30, for his versatility and clubhouse presence. Orioles fans will like seeing him at the plate far less often -- his .545 OPS last season was the lowest among American League regular players by 54 points.

-- David Andriesen

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Posted on: November 18, 2010 3:30 pm
 

Orioles looking at Bartlett, Hardy


The Baltimore Sun notes that the Orioles haven't ruled out Cesar Izturis returning at shortstop (though they should rule it out -- the guy had a .545 OPS, lowest among qualified AL players by 54 points ) but are talking trade with the Rays and Twins.

The Rays have Reid Brignac set to step in for Jason Bartlett, and are desperate for relievers. The Orioles reportedly offered David Hernandez. Bartlett would be a pricey option for the Orioles, considering he's arbitration-eligible, made $4 million last season and becomes a free agent after 2011.

The Twins' J.J. Hardy also is an impending free agent, but the Orioles have reportedly talked swap with Minnesota.

One column in the Sun calls for the Orioles to sign Derek Jeter. For a lot of reasons, that's not going to happen.

-- David Andriesen

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Posted on: November 17, 2010 9:47 am
 

Wednesday morning rumor roundup


Tuesday's opening day of the GM meetings was surprisingly action-packed. What will Wednesday bring? Here are some of the rumor tumbleweeds blowing around Orlando and beyond:

* Expanding the playoffs in time for 2011 is unlikely, because it would require tearing up the current collective bargaining agreement. Much more likely is writing it into the new CBA for 2012. (New York Daily News )

* Executives still think Cliff Lee will end up in pinstripes. (New York Post )

* Those same executives think the Florida teams are the most likely landing places if the Diamondbacks opt to move Justin Upton, though the Red Sox and Yankees have made inquiries. (New York Post )

* Maximum contract Boston is willing to offer Adrian Beltre: four years, $52 million. (Boston Globe )

* The Dodgers are trying to figure out what to do with Russell Martin. (Los Angeles Times )

* The Cubs finally unveiled some images of their plans for Wrigley Field renovations. (Chicago Tribune )

* There are several options for the Twins' middle infield, including Tsuyoshi Nishioka, though Minnesota seems unlikely to win the posting. (Star Tribune )

* The Orioles haven't gotten anywhere with Ty Wigginton or Cesar Izturis beyond initial conversations. (mlbtr.com)

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: November 9, 2010 4:06 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:28 pm
 

Jeter wins another Gold Glove

Oh, as we complain again and again about the Baseball Writers Association of America and their votes for MVP and Cy Young, the coaches and managers once again show they're not a better committee to choose the biggest awards in the game.

Exhibit A: Derek Jeter, Gold Glover.

Derek Jeter Yep, Jeter won the Gold Glove again on Tuesday in a vote from American League coaches and managers. Derek Jeter with a -5.4 UZR/150, -13 runs saved and -17 plus/minus, was determined by the coaches and managers to be the best defensive shortstop in the American League. Among qualified players, only Tampa Bay's Jason Bartlett (-13.8) and Kansas City's Yuniesky Betancourt (-9.2) had a worse UZR/150.

Sure, Jeter had just six errors, but the idea that errors tell you much about a player's defense is preposterous. It tells you who is able to make the routine plays best. That's well and good, but it has little to do with the best all-around defensive player. Jeter has the range of, well, a mediocre 36-year old defensive player. (You know how many times you see Jeter go into the hole and doing that leaping throw, but doesn't quite get the runner? Oh, what a gutty play, he doesn't get an E. Thing is, most other shortstops don't have to make that jump and get the runner.)

Who would be a better choice? Well, who wouldn't?

The Fielding Bible Awards had Chicago's Alexei Ramirez as its third-place finisher, and best among AL players. Ramirez's UZR/150 was 10.1, he had 16 runs saved and a 20 plus/minus.

In UZR/150, Ramirez was trailed by Oakland's Cliff Pennington (8.8), Baltimore's Cesar Izturis (5.8) and Texas' Elvis Andrus (0.3), among qualified players.

The Gold Gloves have been one of those openly mocked selections since a designated hitter won one in 1999 (Rafael Palmeiro). Defense, even in this day and age of advanced statistics, is still highly subjective, with reputation playing more of a role than production. That's what the Gold Glove tells us every year. It also tells us the coaches and managers have as much of a Yankee bias as the media is accused of having.

Alex Rodriguez was the only Yankee infielder not to be awarded, even though the advanced statistics liked Oakland's infield much more.

Mark Teixeira won at first base, even though Oakland's Daric Barton was likely the best choice. Mark Ellis had the top UZR/150 among second basemen (12.7), but the winner was Robinson Cano (-0.9).  Also deserving at second would be Minnesota's Orlando Hudson (12.0 UZR/150). Hudson was the top AL vote-getter in the Fielding Bible Awards, while Ellis was behind him.

As for the outfield, that's probably where a Yankee was actually left off. Left fielder Brett Gardner had the best UZR/150 of any qualified outfielders with a 27.9. He also won the Fielding Bible Award in left field.

American League Gold Glove winners
P Mark Buehrle, White Sox
C Joe Mauer, Twins
1B Mark Teixeira, Yankees
2B Robinson Cano, Yankees
3B Evan Longoria, Rays
SS Derek Jeter, Yankees
OF Carl Crawford, Rays
OF Franklin Gutierrez, Mariners
OF Ichiro Suzuki, Mariners

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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Posted on: June 17, 2010 6:09 pm
Edited on: July 5, 2010 2:28 pm
 

Angels may need outside help for SS

Erick Aybar The Angels are now without their two main shortstops as Macier Izturis hit the disabled list on Wednesday because of a strained left forearm.

The other shortstop, Erick Aybar, has avoided the disabled list thus far after seeing meniscal damage to his left knee, injured on a Casey McGehee takeout slide Monday. But if Aybar does hit the disabled list, the Angels are suddenly looking at being without a major-league caliber shortstop for a long period of time.

Right now, the Angels are asking former top prospect Brandon Wood, handed the third base job out of spring training, to shift back to shortstop, the position he played for years in the minor leagues. However, questions remain with Wood's bat as he is hitting a paltry .156 in 128 at-bats.

The team's other option is a 31-year-old journeyman in Triple-A, so general manager Tony Reagins admitted to the Los Angeles Times that the team may have to look outside the organization for shortstop help. Of course, a lot depends on how long Izturis and Aybar are out for. If it's just the minimum 15 days, the Angels may opt to scrape by or acquire a capable fill-in that can head to the bench. If it's much longer than 15 days, then clearly the Halos will have to pursue a higher-caliber player.

Who could the team pursue? Here's a list.
  • Ronny Cedeno: .235/.276/.333 in 204 at-bats. The Pirates are mired in laughable levels of losing even as the team graduates its best prospects to the majors. While Cedeno would be far from a solution, he could fit short-term and then head to the bench. Despite Cedeno's inability to hit, he boasts a slick glove and could play all around the diamond for the Angels once the team gets its shortstops back.
  • Craig Counsell: .277/.330/.366 in 101 AB. Yes, the 39-year-old is still around -- and producing. He's a bench player for the Milwaukee Brewers, but that's another NL Central team that has to be thinking of giving up on 2010 shortly. Counsell is in his fourth year with Milwaukee and is signed to an affordable deal.
  • Stephen Drew: .275/.344/.445 in 229 AB. If the Angels acquired Drew, it would be to install him at shortstop permanently. It's tough to imagine the Angels giving up what would be required for the 27-year-old, but the Diamondbacks intend to make just Ian Kennedy and Justin Upton untouchable in trade talks this summer, so the possibility is there.
  • Adam Everett: .185/.221/.247 in 81 AB. Everett is an older version of Cedeno, but would be easier to get considering the Tigers just realized him. No, he hasn't wielded a bat in quite some time but his vacuum on defense will give him a job. It wouldn't be surprising if the Angels signed Everett to a minor league deal even if Aybar can return to the lineup immediately.
  • Cristian Guzman: .297/.323/.369 in 222 AB. Guzman has an empty batting average, is a liability on shortstop and is owed $8 million. Other than that, hey, he's perfect.
  • Cesar Izturis: .222/.277/.269 in 108 AB. The Orioles have their hands full with a meager 18 victories on the season, and Izturis isn't important to the team's future. Izturis is also defensively inclined. There's not much separation between Izturis, Cedeno and Everett, so the smart money, again, rests on Everett simply by virtue of Everett being a free agent, allowing the Angels not to surrender anything in trade.
  • Edgar Renteria: .326/.372/.395 in 86 AB: Renteria has gotten his season off to a strong start, but most of his defensive value is gone. While he's been a bit underrated lately, it's clear he's on the tail end of his career. Renteria may be the best option of anyone on this list to fill in for a few months if needed, but one thing that might scare the Angels away is Renteria's numbers in the AL. In two seasons in the AL, one year apiece with the Red Sox and Tigers, he had a .711 OPS. In 13 NL seasons, he has a .753 mark.
  • Ryan Theriot. With the arrival of Starlin Castro, Theriot has been pushed out of shortstop. What may may him unavailable to the Angels is the fact Theroit is now the Cubs' second baseman. While he's currently being benched in a timeshare with Mike Fontenot and Jeff Baker, the team hasn't indicated they don't still see Theriot as a long-term 2B.
  • Omar Vizquel: .241/.301/.325 in 95 AB. The White Sox may be about to wave the white flag, and Vizquez would certainly prefer to play for a contender in what may be his swan song. Like many on the list, his value is in defense. That said, his bat isn't an embarassment like it was in his final year with the Giants in 2008 and at least has some life in it. Vizquez would also bring some notoriety to the club and the 43-year-old is known as a strong mentor. Given that Vizquel would come at a low price, he's looking like an appealing short-term solution at short and long-term backup.
  • Jack Wilson: .253/.275/.347 in 83 AB. A move for Wilson would be rather unlikely as he's tied up through 2011 for $5 million, but the Mariners may make him available in trade. He's lost playing time to the hot-hitting Jack Wilson and has developed a reputation for being injury-prone.
-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com