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Tag:Dayan Viciedo
Posted on: December 10, 2011 12:05 pm
 

Homegrown Team: Chicago White Sox

Magglio Ordonez

By C. Trent Rosecrans


What if players were only permitted to stay with the team that originally made them a professional? No trades, no Rule-5 Draft, no minor or major league free agency ... once you are a professional baseball player, you stay in that organization. This series shows how all 30 teams would look. We give you: Homegrown teams. To view the schedule/past entries of this feature, click here.

If there's an opposite of the Oakland A's and Billy Beane's Moneyball, it's Kenny Williams and the White Sox. The White Sox have not drafted well and searched to fill holes through free agency, spending money and taking big chances in trades. While Williams' way makes him the butt of some jokes and nobody's making a movie about him anytime soon, he does have something Beane doesn't have -- a World Series trophy.

Lineup

1. Alexei Ramirez, SS
2. Gordon Beckham, 2B
3. Michael Morse, 1B
4. Chris Young, CF
5. Carlos Lee, DH
6. Magglio Ordonez, RF
7. Ryan Sweeney, LF
8. Brent Morel, 3B
9. Chris Stewart, C

Starting Rotation

1. Mark Buehrle
2. Gio Gonzalez
3. Daniel Hudson
4. Brandon McCarthy
5. Clayton Richard

Bullpen

Closer - Jon Rauch
Set up - Matt Guerrier, Chris Sale, Addison Reed, Boone Logan, John Ely
Long - Lucas Harrell

Notable Bench Players

Not surprisingly, when looking at the state of the organization (and the state of that lineup), the White Sox are thin on bench players, with Dayan Viciedo making a push for the starting lineup as well as Chris Getz on the infield and Mike Cameron in the outfield.

What's Good?

There's no Adam Dunn, for starters. The rotation is good, especially at the top with Buehrle and Gonzalez. The rest of the rotation is good enough, as well. While Rauch isn't the top closer around, the rest of the bullpen is talented.

What's Not?

The lineup isn't going to strike fear into too many pitching staffs, even though there are nice pieces. The corner outfielder and DH are all on the down side of their career. There's also not much depth on the roster among position players.

Comparison to real 2011

The White Sox finished 79-83 in 2011, thanks to poor seasons from Dunn, Morel, Beckham and Alex Rios. The rotation is likely a little better in real life than this team, while the bullpen is better here than in real life, evening out. The lineup may not put up a lot of runs, but the White Sox didn't, either. The real team has an impact bat in Paul Konerko and a good complimentary piece in Carlos Quentin. This lineup doesn't have those kinds of weapons, so I'm not so sure our hypothetical team could match the 79 wins the White Sox finished with in 2011.

Next: Baltimore Orioles

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 10, 2011 4:38 pm
Edited on: November 10, 2011 9:51 pm
 

Five hits, misses on recent Cuban imports

By Matt Snyder

With 26-year-old Cuban star Yoennis Cespedes ready to join Major League Baseball, it's worth taking a look at some of the recent Cuban players to defect to America. Obviously, there have been lots of players in history to come to America from Cuba and the interesting twist is that not near as much is known about these players as ones from other international destinations due to the embargo. So it's often a bit of a guessing game, in conjunction with Cuban numbers (which sometimes vary) and individual team workouts. Here are five recent hits and misses on Cuban imports -- at least as things appear now.

So far, so good

Yonder Alonso, Reds. The 24-year-old slugger looks like a rising star, if the Reds can either find a defensive spot for him or trade him somewhere that he can play everyday (or trade Joey Votto and play Alonso at first?!). In only 98 plate appearances in the majors, the highly-touted prospect hit .330 with five homers, 15 RBI and a .943 OPS this past season.

Aroldis Chapman, Reds. He went through a stretch of command problems in 2011 -- in six appearances he allowed 13 walks and 11 earned runs in just 3 1/3 innings -- but was strong once again after he was recalled from the minors. We've seen the phenom hit 105 on the radar gun and the strikeout rate (90 K in 63 1/3 innings) bodes well for the success of the 23-year-old lefty moving forward. Plus, considering the aforementioned horrifying stretch of six games, Chapman still has a 3.27 ERA and 1.25 WHIP in 69 appearances.

Kendrys Morales, Angels. He finished fifth in American League MVP voting in 2009 and was having another good season in 2010 before a broken leg hit the pause button on his career.

Alexei Ramirez, White Sox. In four big-league seasons, the average line for the Cuban Missile has been .279/.323/.421 with 17 homers, 71 RBI, 75 runs and 12 stolen bases. Lots of teams would take that from their shortstop.

Dayan Viciedo, White Sox. Sure, I'm banking on him blossoming at the major-league level, but Viciedo has shown good power at every stop. Last season, he hit .296 with 20 homers, 78 RBI and an .856 OPS in Triple-A. Those who have seen him in person know he's capable of some prodigious shots, too, like Mark Reynolds-level power. Considering Viciedo's only 22, there's definitely a good shot he becomes a 25-to-30-homer guy in the majors.

So far, not so good

Francisley Bueno. The 30-year-old left-handed pitcher has logged over 500 mediocre minor-league innings. His shot in the bigs lasted just 2 1/3 innings for the Braves, in which he allowed five hits and two earned runs.

Barbaro Canizares. He actually mashed in the Mexican League (Triple-A) in 2011, hitting .396/.499/.653 with 20 homers in just 83 games, so maybe he'll back. But he always hit in the minors before, too, it was getting a shot in the bigs that was a problem for Canizares. He only received 21 plate appearances for the Braves in 2009, getting just four hits (.190). He's 31 years old.

Yoslan Herrera. His major-league stint came back in 2008, when Herrera put together five unimpressive outings (9.82 ERA, 2.56 WHIP). He last pitched in the minors in 2010 for the Twins' Triple-A affiliate, putting together a 6.08 ERA in 26 2/3 innings.

Yuniesky Maya, Nationals. He's 1-4 with a 5.52 ERA and 1.55 WHIP in 58 2/3 innings at the big-league level. He hasn't fared much better in Triple-A and he's now 30 years old.

Amauri Sanit, Yankees. He's good if he's facing Double-A or worse competition, but after that it's been pretty bad. Sanit has a 5.99 ERA and 1.67 WHIP in 50 Triple-A appearances and was horrible (12.86 ERA, 2.14 WHIP) in seven major-league innings this season. He's 32 and first made an appearance in the minors in 2008, so it's hard to see much changing.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: October 6, 2011 2:50 pm
Edited on: October 6, 2011 4:55 pm
 

R.I.P.: 2011 Chicago White Sox

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Another season gone, another disappointment for 29 teams as one is immortalized forever. Let’s take a look back at 2011 and forward in Eye on Baseball’s R.I.P. series... 

Team name: Chicago White Sox
Record: 79-83, 3rd place AL Central, 16 GB
Manager: Ozzie Guillen/Don Cooper
Best hitter: Paul Konerko -- .300/.388/.517 with 31 HR, 105 RBI
Best pitcher:Mark Buehrle -- 13-0, 3.59 ERA, 205 1/3 IP, 109 SO, 45 BB

2011 SEASON RECAP

That feeling Red Sox and Braves fans had in the last days of the season? That's what it felt like all season long on the Southside of Chicago. The White Sox spent big money to bring Adam Dunn to town and dreams of him crushing balls out of U.S. Cellular Field. Instead, he was the biggest flop since Cowboys vs. Aliens. Dunn had an emergency appendectomy early in the season, and that may have been his highlight for 2011, finishing the season hitting .159/.292/.277 with 11 home runs and 42 RBI. The disappointment in Dunn permeated the entire season, even though the White Sox were just three games back in the American League Central leading up to the trade deadline, they never looked like a serious contender. They didn't disappoint, going 11-17 over the last month of the season as manager Ozzie Guillen dropped hints about wanting out before getting his way and being sent to the Marlins for a couple of minor-leaguers.

2012 AUDIT

The White Sox already have nearly $90 million committed for 2012, so there's little chance of a quick fix. Jake Peavy, Alex Rios, Dunn and Konerko alone will account for $55.5 million, more than the entire 2011 opening day payroll for the Diamondbacks, Indians, Padres, Pirates, Rays and Royals. The will be looking to get some of its younger players, like catcher Tyler Flowers and outfielders Dayan Viciedo and Alejandro De Aza.

FREE AGENTS

LHP Mark Buehrle
OF Juan Pierre
RHP Jason Frasor ($3.75 team option)
UTIL Omar Vizquel
C Ramon Castro

OFFSEASON FOCUS

  • Forget the big-name managerial candidates. There's no need to throw money at Tony La Russa or Terry Francona. Hire Rays bench coach Dave Martinez. He's learned at the hand of baseball's best manager, Joe Maddon, and he's ready for his own challenge. Martinez also knows the landscape, as part of his long big-league career, he played for both the White Sox and Cubs. Sandy Alomar Jr., another former White Sox, would be a good choice, as well. UPDATE: Former third baseman Robin Ventura has been named manager, just hours after this was originally posted.
  • Avoid the free agent market. Yes, this could be difficult for Kenny Williams, but this is not the time for the White Sox to spend big bucks on free agents.
  • Not that anyone expects anything different, the White Sox should give Buehrle a nice watch and wave him goodbye. Buehrle would like to return, but his price tag is likely too high. His time, like Guillen's, is over.
  • Juan Pierre? Gone.
  • Dangle John Danks and Gavin Floyd. While there are some attractive names on the free agent market, the pitching market isn't as as good as the available position players. Teams will be looking for pitching, and either Floyd (making $7 million in 2012 with a club options or 2013) or Danks (in his final year of arbitration). If neither bring back the kind of return the team wants, you can pull them back. Look at Toronto's trade of Shaun Marcum for Brett Lawrie as an example. The White Sox have by far the worst minor-league system in baseball, and it needs replacements.
  • Tell Chris Sale to get ready to start. Kenny Williams already told him this, but let it be known it's his spot to lose.
For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: August 28, 2011 11:35 pm
 

3 Up, 3 Down: White Sox youth movement



By Matt Snyder


Dayan Viciedo/Tyler Flowers, White Sox. The White Sox moved one game over .500 and to within six of the AL Central-leading Tigers with a 9-3 win over the Mariners Sunday, and the young guys were front and center. White Sox fans have clamored for Viciedo's promotion from the minors all summer and he finally made it to the show Sunday. In his first start of the 2011 season, Viciedo hit a three-run home run to give the Sox a 3-0 lead. Later, 25-year-old catcher Flowers must have felt a bit left out, because he clubbed a grand slam in the sixth inning, as part of a six-run rally that would put the game away.

Zack Greinke, Brewers. Greinke worked 7 2/3 innings, allowing just four hits and one run while striking out seven in the Brewers 3-2 win over the Cubs, but that's not why he's here. No, Greinke's getting the nod as an "up" for stealing a base. It was a straight steal, too. Meanwhile, the Brewers are actually only five games behind the Phillies for the best record in baseball. It's been quite the amazing run (27-5 in last 32 games).

Zach Britton, Orioles. Britton has shown flashes of brilliance this year as a rookie, giving the Orioles hope their future ace is soon to emerge, and Sunday he put forth one of his strongest efforts of the season. The young left-hander threw seven shutout innings against the powerful Yankees, allowing only four hits and a walk in a 2-0 Orioles victory. It marked the sixth straight win for the Orioles, though that streak would stop with the nightcap. Still, a very solid effort for Britton.



Jered Weaver, Angels. The Angels went all in during a three-game visit to Texas this weekend, as they brought Ervin Santana and Jered Weaver to the hill on short rest. Santana fared well enough to get the Angels a win Saturday -- along with some offensive help -- but Sunday Weaver did not. The Rangers' offense pegged him for eight hits and seven earned runs in six-plus innings. Weaver even walked four guys, so his command may have been affected by the short rest. Also, a lot of damage was done in the seventh, when Weaver was pulled before recording an out and was charged with his last three earned runs. So it's possible his stamina was also affected by the short rest. Whatever the reason, the Angels lost 9-5 and fell to three games out in the AL West.

Brad Penny, Tigers.
Maybe all the cussing is getting him off his game? Penny was roughed up by a Twins lineup that was missing Joe Mauer and Michael Cuddyer. Plus, they just traded Jim Thome. Still, in five innings Penny gave up eight hits and seven runs en route to an 11-4 loss.

Eli Whiteside, Giants. How much do the Giants continue to miss Buster Posey? The offense has been an issue all season, as the Giants rank dead last in the NL in runs scored. Sunday, catcher Whiteside went 0-for-4 with four strikeouts. To make matters worse, Whiteside could have made it to first base on a wild pitch on his fourth strikeout but didn't run (Extra Baggs). When you lose 4-3 in extra innings to the hapless Astros, that's a tough pill to swallow.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: August 26, 2011 9:02 pm
 

White Sox to disable Quentin, call for Viciedo

QuentinBy Evan Brunell

The White Sox are placing Carlos Quentin on the 15-day disabled list, the Chicago Sun-Times tweets, as the outfielder was unable to avoid the DL after sitting out the last three games with a sprained AC joint in his left shoulder (pictured, leaving the game last Saturday). Quentin's shoulder didn't respond on Friday to some swings, leading to being placed on the DL.

As the White Sox have scuffled all season long but remain in shooting distance of the division title, Quentin has been one of the team's most reliable players. The right fielder has cranked 24 homers on the year, posting a .255/.341/.501 mark with 77 RBI. It's definitely a significant blow to the team, especially as Quentin will now miss the crucial three-game series beginning on Sept. 2 against the first-place Tigers.

Luckily for the White Sox, they may have someone ready to step in. Dayan Viciedo is being recalled from Triple-A, as the Sun-Times says, and will share time in the outfield replacing Quentin, as well as possibly some first-base time. Viciedo has been pounding on the door to the majors for some time now, but has been blocked by a full outfield that hasn't been particularly productive all season with Juan Pierre and Alex Rios stumbling. However, Pierre got hot right around the breaking point for his slump, while Rios has been placed with center fielder Alejandro De Aza, a position Viciedo can't play anyways.

Viciedo, who flashed power but a poor eye in a 31-game stint with the White Sox last season, has stroked 20 homers for Triple-A at age 22, slashing .297/.365/.492 in 504 plate appearances. That's a line that can help the White Sox -- but he'll have to convince skipper Ozzie Guillen to play him.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeonBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: July 21, 2011 12:18 pm
Edited on: July 21, 2011 12:33 pm
 

White Sox pitching coach hangs up on radio hosts

Don CooperBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Ozzie Guillen isn't the only one on the White Sox coaching staff getting fed up with the way Chicago is playing this season. Pitching coach Don Cooper hung up on a paid sports-talk radio appearance Thursday when the hosts asked him about calling up prospect Dayan Viciedo.

Here's a roundup of the appearance on "The Mully & Hanley Show" on WSCR-AM 670 in Chicago, via the Chicago Tribune:

"I have no clue about that. I'm a coach," Cooper said. "Do I feel like something (needs to be done)? Yeah, we have to score some runs. That's what's got to be done. And if we do, we have a chance to win. And if we don't, we won't.

"Nice try, asking me to bring up (bleeping) Viciedo. I'm not in charge of making moves, I'm in charge of coaching."

When host Brian Hanley told Cooper that he wasn't trying to put him on the spot, Cooper hung up.

Viciedo is hitting .311/.367/.510 with 16 home runs and 64 RBI in 93 games for Triple-A Charlotte. Viciedo played in 38 games for the White Sox last season, hitting .308/.321/.519 with five home runs and 13 RBI. A native of Cuba, Viciedo, 22, played third base for the White Sox last season but has been moved to the outfield this season.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: July 10, 2011 3:48 pm
Edited on: July 10, 2011 4:59 pm
 

Viciedo's magnificent power



By Matt Snyder


PHOENIX - White Sox prospect Dayan Viciedo is hitting cleanup for the World Team in Sunday's Future's Game at Chase Field here in Arizona. The 22 year old has 16 homers in Triple-A so far this season, and we just got a glimpse of the inate power he possesses.

During batting practice, Viciedo hit an absolute moonshot to left-center field. Look at the picture above and I'll give an idea of how far it was. Look at the huge video board and move up and to the left a bit, where you can see the Miller Lite ad. Right below that, look where it says "NL West Champions" and "NL Champions." Yeah, that's where a batting practice ball off Viciedo's bat hit. It's 413 feet just over the fence in that area of the field, so Viciedo's shot had to have approached 500 feet (475 or so? Maybe more?).

Sure, it's only batting practice, but that's still impressive power.

At the end of BP, we'll rank the top three in power displays as: 1. Vicideo, 2. Will Middlebrooks (Red Sox system), 3. Bryce Harper.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 14, 2011 11:38 am
Edited on: June 14, 2011 12:02 pm
 

Next ChiSox slugger Viciedo biding time in minors

Viciedo

By Evan Brunell

The next big White Sox slugger, GM Kenny Williams believes, is currently plying his trade in Triple-A. Unfortunately for Dayan Viciedo, he hasn't received the call to the majors yet in 2011.

"I'm not going to bring him here to sit," Williams told MLB.com. "[Manager] Ozzie [Guillen] is not ready to change the mix he has right now, and that has to be respected."

Viciedo is currently hitting .318/.365/.518 down in Triple-A with 10 home runs in 266 plate appearances. Factor in the 22-year-old's .308/.321/.519 mark in the majors last season over 106 PA, and it certainly seems as if Viciedo is ready.

"It would be awfully interesting to have him in this lineup," said Williams. "He's ready. He's obviously got some things he still needs to work on, but I would have no qualms about bringing him here.

Nicknamed "The Cuban Tank," the main blocking of Viciedo is due to left fielder Juan Pierre. After coming up as a third baseman, Viciedo has shifted to right field, which the team believes has allowed him to focus on offense. But Viciedo won't be supplanting DH Adam Dunn, center fielder Alex Rios nor corner outfielder Carlos Quentin anytime soon. That leaves Pierre, but Guillen believes that speed at the top of the lineup is valuable.

Still, even to Guillen speed only goes so far.

"If you have speed and you can't hit, then we don't need your speed," said Guillen. "Speed is good when you get on base and you can hit, and that's what Juan has been doing lately. You always like to have some speed at the top to make things happen. This guy can run, but you can't steal first."

Pierre hasn't exactly been getting on base lately, counter to Guillen's belief. He did have a .286 average and .365 OBP in May, but his OBP was .286 in April and .311 in June, which gives him an overall line of .259/.324/.304. In addition, the 33-year-old has stolen 10 bases -- and been caught nine times, which leads all of baseball. Players need to steal bags at a minimum rate of 75 percent to break even and cause stealing bases to be of value to a team, so Pierre is actively harming the White Sox with his decisions. Also, Pierre has been uncharacteristically poor in the field, which creates an all-around lousy player.

Viciedo is expected to supplant Pierre in the outfield, whether that's this month or after the season as Pierre is an impending free agent. And Viciedo himself expects big things.

"That's going to be the trio of Chicago," Viciedo mentioned of himself, Carlos Quentin and Alex Rios.

"There are some pretty good hitters in the lineup just mentioned," Williams said. "Someone else will have to figure out the leadoff spot, if that were something to think about."

Viciedo hasn't come up even as a bench player yet because both Williams and Guillen are in agreement that Viciedo needs to play every day. Guillen says if Viciedo is called up, he needs to play at least five times a week, good for about 20-30 plate appearances.

"He is slowly acquiring a little bit more plate discipline, and the ball comes off of his bat harder than anyone we have," Williams added. "And the sky is the limit to where his potential can take him."

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com