Tag:Joe Torre
Posted on: February 24, 2012 9:16 am
Edited on: February 24, 2012 10:24 am
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Torre's group out of bidding for Dodgers

Joe TorreBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Joe Torre is no longer the Dodgers' manager and it appears he won't own the team, either.

Torre and Los Angeles developer Rick Caruso have withdrawn their bid to buy the Dodgers, Bill Shaikin of the Los Agneles Times reports.

Caruso and Torre cited current owner Frank McCourt's refusal to include the Dodger Stadium parking lots in the deal as the reason they were pulling out of the bidding. The report notes the pair could reenter the bidding if McCourt agrees to include the parking lots.

With the Torre-Caruso pairing out of the bidding, there are still thought to be nine groups bidding for the team, including one led by Magic Johnson and former Braves and Nationals executive Stan Kasten.

The agreement between Major League Baseball and McCourt allows him to retain ownership of the parking lots and even build parking structures on the land if he wants. The new owners of the team would inherit the lease for the parking lots at $14 million per season, with increases starting in 2015.

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Posted on: February 9, 2012 12:57 pm
 

11 bidders for Dodgers revealed

By C. Trent Rosecrans

There are 11 groups that have advanced to the second round of bidding for the Dodgers, and the Los Angeles Times' Bill Shaikin has the entire list.

Here's Shaikin's list, taken from his story, with his notes on the bidders:
Magic Johnson/Stan Kasten: Could soon be joined by richest man in L.A., Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong.

Rick Caruso/Joe Torre: Not out of the running in the Soon-Shiong sweepstakes.

Steven Cohen/Arn Tellem: Cohen about to invest $20 million in Mets, able to spend 75-100 times as much on Dodgers.

Stan Kroenke: Owner of NFL's St. Louis Rams could move L.A.'s football team back home.

Peter O'Malley: Former Dodgers owner backed by South Korean conglomerate E-Land.

Tony Ressler: Minority owner of Brewers has discussed partnership with O'Malley.

Leo Hindery/Tom Barrack: New York media executive has teamed with L.A. real estate investor and sportsman.

Stanley Gold/Disney family: That's the family of the late Roy Disney, Walt's nephew.

Jared Kushner: Publisher of New York Observer, son-in-law of Donald Trump.

Michael Heisley: Owner of NBA's Memphis Grizzlies hired Jerry West to run his team.

Alan Casden: USC Board of Trustees includes Dodgers bidders Casden, Caruso, Gold.
Shainkin writes that late bidders could still enter the field, but it appears to be set among this 11. Heisley, the owner of the Memphis Grizzlies also bid on the Cubs and the Minnesota Vikings of the NFL. The 75-year-old Chicago resident has said he'd be willing to sell the Grizzlies to a Memphis-based owner, but nobody has taken him up on it.

Shaikin has been the authority on the entire McCourt story and has just done amazing work. If you have the least bit of interest in the Dodgers' bidding and McCourt mess, he's a must-follow on the internet and on Twitter (@BillShaikin). I'm in awe of the work he's done on this story, as he's been ahead of the curve every step of the way and done some amazing reporting on the dollars, cents and sense of the entire story.

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Posted on: January 30, 2012 1:05 pm
Edited on: January 30, 2012 1:06 pm
 

Korean company among Dodgers bidders

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Korean retailer E-Land leads a consortium that is on the short list of Dodgers bidders, Yohap News Agency reported on Monday (via Reuters).

This weekend, the Los Angeles Times reported that at least eight bidders had advanced from the more than 12 initial bids. Already out include Mark Cuban, as well as the group including Steve Garvey and Orel Hershiser.

Dodgers in transition
Joining the Korean group in on the bidding is thought to believe a group led by Magic Johnson, another led by real estate developer Rick Caruso (that includes Joe Torre) and another by hedge fundmanager Steven Cohen.

The total cost is expected to be at least $1.5 million.

Major League Baseball has agreed to approve as many as 10 bidders, with Frank McCourt revealing the winning bid by April 1.

The Korean company wouldn't be the first Asian owners in baseball, Nintendo owns the Seattle Mariners.

Baseball is popular in Korea and its national team reached the finals of the last World Baseball Classic, losing to rival Japan in the championship game. Los Angeles also has a huge Korean American population -- more than 300,000, according to the 2009 American Community Survey.

The Dodgers also signed Chan-Ho Park, who was the first South Korean-born player in big league history when he debuted with Los Angeles in 1994.

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Posted on: January 24, 2012 3:31 pm
Edited on: January 24, 2012 3:33 pm
 

La Russa to manage NL squad in All-Star Game

Tony La Russa

By C. Trent Rosecrans


Tony La Russa hasn't managed his last game. The retired Cardinals manager will lead the National League in this year's All-Star Game in Kansas City, commissioner Bud Selig announced on Tuesday.

It will be La Russa's sixth time managing in the All-Star Game, third in the National League. The manager of the defending league champion gets the nod every year, but this is the first time a retired manager has gotten the honor. Twice before managers have left a World Series team and managed in a different uniform the next season. Dick Williams did it in 1974 after leaving the A's for the Angels, and Dusty Baker donned the Cubs uniform in the 2003 game after leading the Giants to the 2002 World Series.

"Tony earned this opportunity with the remarkable run that the Cardinals completed last October, and I am delighted that he shared my enthusiasm about his staying in this role," Selig said in a statement released by MLB. "The All-Star Game celebrated all the best of our game, and it is very approrpriate that we will have the chance to celebrated one of the greatest managerial careers of all-time as part of the festivities."

Only Casey Stengel (10), Walter Alston (nine) and Joe McCarthy (seven), will have managed more All-Star Games than La Russa. Joe Torre also managed in six All-Star Games.

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Posted on: January 23, 2012 2:44 pm
 

Sorting through potential Dodgers bidders



By Matt Snyder


With the wildly unpopular Frank McCourt headed out the door, the Los Angeles Dodgers are for sale. Bids are actually due Monday and McCourt has agreed to make a decision by April 1.

Via Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times, here is a list of the prospective bidders:

Magic Johnson/Stan Kasten: Kasten has been president of the Braves and is the Nationals' current president. And we all know what Magic means to L.A.

Joe Torre/Rick Caruso: The former Dodgers manager and current vice president of the MLB heads up the group.

Steven Cohen/Arn Tellem: Cohen, a hedge fund manager, is one of the richest men in America while Tellem is a high-profile agent.

Mark Cuban: The Dallas Mavericks owner finally got his championship last NBA season, so maybe it's time to get an MLB team? Note that he's tried in the past -- most famously with the Cubs -- to buy a team. It's just that past reports have indicated Bud Selig and several other owners don't want Cuban to join their club.

Tom Barrack: Shaikin reports Barrack has owned a japanese baseball team and a french soccer team in the past.

Ron Burkle: While he can't match Cohen, Burkle is also a member of the Forbes 400, sporting an estimated net worth of $3.2 billion. He's a part owner of the NHL's Pittsburgh Penguins.

Stanley Gold/Disney family: Gold is the president and CEO of Disney's private investment company. The Disney name doesn't really need any further explanation.

Peter O'Malley: The former Dodgers owner apparently wants back in.

Tony Ressler: He's an investor and minority owner of the Brewers.

Dennis Gilbert: The former agent lost out on the bidding for the Rangers.

Alan Casden: He's a self-made real estate developer in Beverly Hills, so that seems like a good fit. Shaikin reports, however, that "MLB wasn't comfortable" with Casden last time he placed a bid on the club.

Tom Golisano: He used to own the Buffalo Sabres of the NHL.

Fred Claire: He was the GM of the Dodgers from 1987-1998.

Steve Garvey/Orel Hershiser: Baseball fans are obviously familiar with the Dodgers connection here.

Fox or Time Warner: We know the TV money is big, but Shaikin reports neither group really wants the team -- they just don't want the other side to buy the team. So each might bid. Try untangling that web of logic.

The Field: The bidding process is not public, so it wouldn't be a total shock of the eventual Dodgers owner was a group or person not on this list.

While it's hard to tell how this entire process will shake out, it has to be a relief to Major League Baseball and Dodgers fans that the next owner is simply going to be ABFM (Anyone But Frank McCourt).

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Posted on: October 31, 2011 1:19 pm
Edited on: November 14, 2011 9:16 pm
 

Potential replacements for La Russa



By Matt Snyder


It's back to reality in St. Louis. The Cardinals got to bask in the glory of their World Series championship for a few days, culminating with a parade Sunday afternoon. Afterwards, manager Tony La Russa told the players he's retiring. Monday morning, the move was announced in a press conference at Busch Stadium.

So it's back to business for general manager John Mozeliak. Here are a few names that might be considered -- or at least names that people might be throwing around the rumor mill in the next few days:

Terry Francona - It feels like he's got to be the immediate front-runner, though this is only speculation. Francona won two pennants and two World Series championships in eight seasons for the Red Sox, piling up a .574 winning percentage despite playing in the toughest division in baseball. He needed to get out of Boston and he did, but that doesn't mean he's averse to another job immediately.

Joe Maddon - Maddon took over the embarrassment that was the Devil Rays back in 2006. In 2008 they were just the Rays and playing in the World Series. These Rays are a perennial contender and Maddon's as much a part of that as anyone. There's no question Maddon is one of the best managers in baseball, but would he leave Tampa Bay? If Mozeliak wants Maddon, he needs to sell Maddon on the difference in experience between Tampa Bay's financial woes, low fan support and awful facilities to what he'd get in St. Louis.

La Russa retires
Terry Pendleton - He played the first seven years of his career for the Cardinals (1984-1990), was the Braves' hitting coach from 2001-2010 and is currently the Braves' first-base coach. Pendleton has been connected to Cardinals via rumors in the past (when La Russa was reportedly mulling retirement) and has also been reportedly considered to be named the manager of both the Nationals and Braves at different times. He seems like one of those guys on the cusp of getting his first shot, so maybe it happens here.

Bobby Valentine - Hey, there's a managerial opening, so we have to throw Valentine's name in the ring, right? I actually think it's a rule, so don't blame me for falling in line.

Ryne Sandberg - Sandberg is probably closer to getting his first shot than Pendleton, but both the Red Sox and Cubs are likely strongly considering him. It would be another slap in the face to the rival Cubs if the Cardinals hired the Hall of Famer (he played the overwhelming majority of his career for the Cubs -- just a heads-up to those historically challenged), but should that even be a consideration in the hiring process?

Jose Oquendo - Another former Cardinals player, the versatile Oquendo was with St. Louis from 1986-1995. He has been the Cardinals' third-base coach since 2000 and has interviewed for several other managerial openings. Oquendo also served as the manager for Puerto Rico in each of the first two World Baseball Classics.

Jim Riggleman - Riggleman played in the Cardinals' minor-league system and also managed at both the Class-A and Double-A levels for the Cardinals back in the early 1980s. He's a very highly respected baseball man, but his track record as a manager isn't sparkling. He's managed 12 seasons and made the playoffs just once (the 1998 Cubs, who had to win a one-game playoff to take the wild card). Also, the manner in which he resigned this past season from the Nationals' managerial post can't leave teams pining to hire Riggleman.

Joe Torre - Um, yeah, he's not going to manage anymore. Don't waste your time even thinking about this one.

Dave Duncan - The best pitching coach in the game is too valuable in his current role. Plus, not many pitching coaches make a successful transition to manager. I can't see the Cardinals taking this route.

Mark McGwire - One year of being a hitting coach doesn't mean he's ready to be a big-league manager. There are so many more qualified guys to have the manager job, I don't see Big Mac even being a consideration.

Albert Pujols - Hey, the White Sox considered Paul Konerko as a player-manager, right? And what better way to afford Pujols than to give him the salaries for both the manager and a superstar first baseman. Plus, he's been calling hit-and-run for years! (This is a joke, by the way. Pujols is not going to be even considered).

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Posted on: October 26, 2011 6:28 pm
Edited on: October 26, 2011 6:41 pm
 

MLB correctly errs on side of caution



By Matt Snyder


ST. LOUIS -- Major League Baseball had a tough decision Wednesday. On one hand, the weather reports for the scheduled game -- Game 6 of the World Series to those who have been living under a rock for the past week -- looked bleak. Does the league take the chance that the game is marred by weather, like Game 1 of the ALDS between the Tigers and Yankees this season or, even worse, Game 5 of the 2008 World Series between the Phillies and Rays? On the other hand, what if the forecast is wrong and the league is embarrassed again, just like in Game 2 of the ALCS, when it was a sunny day when the first pitch was scheduled, but the game was postponed earlier that afternoon?

That was the issue facing Major League Baseball. Ultimately, it factored everything in and believed the prudent decision was postponement.

"You get to Game 6 of the World Series, and you want to guard -- as long as you have a forecast that we're expecting clear weather tomorrow, and if necessary the next day, I think that was more of a decision-maker than anything else, just the fact that we're anticipating rain during the game," MLB vice president Joe Torre said Wednesday afternoon.

World Series Coverage
"(The game was postponed) just basically for convenience," Torre said. "Because of the forecast there was no reason to wait any longer, and the earlier we can do it, the more people can change plans and do what they need to do, and including the players and managers, too."

Torre mentioned also that this next game being a possible clinching game of the World Series weighed heavily on the decision, again, teamed with the fact that the forecast for the next two days seems clear (Weather.com's hourly forecast for Thursday night, at this point, has a zero percent chance of rain throughout the game).

Torre also noted that the decision was entirely made by Major League Baseball officials, and that there was no input from either the Rangers or Cardinals.

"(Tuesday) I talked to both Wash (Rangers manager Ron Washington) and (Cardinals manager) Tony (La Russa) that if the forecast didn't get measurably better that we were probably going to call it early, and they were both understanding of it," Torre said. "They didn't offer any kind of strategy fight on it."

La Russa and Washington echoed that sentiment.

"No, I was given output," La Russa said. "I just picked up the phone, they said, 'The game's postponed.' No input."

"I want to play," Washington said. "I wasn't asked, but I want to play. But I understand the situation."

Rangers second baseman Ian Kinsler had a similar mindset to his manager.

"It's frustrating as a team," he said. "Same as the regular season, we wanna play every game when it's scheduled. But that's the way it goes."

"It's frustrating that you wanna get these games in because you have so much anxiety," Cardinals second baseman Nick Punto added. "There's an excitement to get ready for Game 6, and then they tell you to go home to be with your family and get ready to go tomorrow."

Despite the frustration at the weather, every player I heard from at least seemed understanding with the situation.

I think everyone would agree it's better to have the game played from start to finish with no delays to protect the integrity of the game. Most involved parties said as much, including Torre, La Russa, Washington and Kinsler.

So complain if you must, but realize there would be complaining if the game was interrupted for several rain delays, too. Major League Baseball was put in a no-win situation by bad weather, and decided to err on the side of caution. In a game as big as Game 6 of the World Series, we can't really ask for much more.

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Posted on: October 25, 2011 2:32 pm
 

Torre: Up to teams to police beer

TorreBy Evan Brunell

Joe Torre, the executive vice president of baseball operations for MLB, joined ESPN Radio on Tuesday to touch on a wide range of topics, including beer in the clubhouse. Torre previously said baseball was looking into the extent of drinking beer in the Red Sox clubhouse and was considering a ban across baseball.

"I know is it’s an individual choice for the ball clubs," Torre said about allowing beer in the clubhouse. "We’re interested in [banning beer]. I probably should have stopped there. It’s basically individual clubs make those decisions, and it’s obvious when you have owners meetings, you certainly let your feelings be heard. But I’m sort of torn because it’s like anything else -- you’d like to have it available if people responded to it and did it in moderation. But you can’t always guarantee that, and then you’re responsible if something goes wrong. It’s even a matter of getting in your car and driving somewhere; that’s the scary part for me. But ... it is up to the individual club to police what they do and make the decisions about how they approach the beer in and beer out.”

Torre was also asked if baseball allows beer because of how long the season is and how the team needs to have an outlet to disengage after playing a game nearly every day.

“Baseball is a game of life," he said. "You eliminate the highs and lows. I think Michael [Kay, Yankees broadcaster] can tell you, he’s traveled with the club for years, you see the players and you see the people who travel more than you see your family. It’s one of those things that in other sports…maybe in the NFL they put players in hotels, they do something because it’s right before the game. This is more…I don’t want to say matter of fact, but the fact of the matter is you’ve got to do this like showing up to the office every day. So I think that’s probably what makes it different as opposed to telling guys they can’t drink beer for seven months, you know?”

Drink along with us and check out the beer-drinking saga.

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