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Tag:Jordan Lyles
Posted on: February 28, 2012 10:27 am
Edited on: February 28, 2012 11:04 am
 

Astros name Brett Myers their closer

Brett Myers

By C. Trent Rosecrans


The Astros' search for a closer has led them to their own rotation. Brett Myers, Houston's opening-day starter a season ago, will close this season, manager Brad Mills told reporters on Tuesday.

Houston Astros
Myers has been a starter in all but one of his 10 years in the majors, closing for the Phillies in 2007. Last year he was 7-14 with a 4.46 ERA in 34 games, 33 of those starts. In 2007, he had 21 saves after moving from the team's opening-day starter to the back of its bullpen. He had a 4.33 ERA overall that season, but had a 2.87 ERA in 48 appearances as a reliever.

The team approached Myers about the switch after he reported to camp. Houston signed Lian Hernandez and Zach Duke to minor-league deals in the offseason to join the rotation with Wandy Rodriguez, Bud Norris and J.A. Happ. The team also has Jordan Lyles, Lucas Harrell, Henry Sosa and Kyle Weiland competing for a starting spot.

"From my standpoint, we have some depth in the rotatiton between Duke, Livan, Happ, Sosa and Harrell and all the young guys," Luhnow told reporters, including Brian McTaggert of MLB.com. "We feel like we're in pretty good shape there and have some choices. We felt like we were a little exposed in the bullpen and having a guy who's been successful in that role and who's got the mentality and stuff to do well takes the pressure off of Brandon Lyon coming off an injury and doesn't put pressure on young kids like David Carpenter and Wilton Lopez."

Lyon started the season as the team's closer last season, but was injured early in the season. Mark Melancon took over, picking up 20 saves. The Astros traded Melancon to the Red Sox for infielder Jed Lowrie and Weiland in December.

Myers, 31, is in the second year of a two-year deal paying him $11 million this season. The Astros have a $10 million club option (with a $3 million buyout) for 2013 that vests based on his number of starts. According to Zachary Levine of the Houston Chronicle (via Twitter), the team has adjusted Myers' option in accordance to his new role.

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Posted on: December 15, 2011 11:14 am
Edited on: December 15, 2011 12:27 pm
 

Homegrown Team: Houston Astros



By Matt Snyder


What if players were only permitted to stay with the team that originally made them a professional? No trades, no Rule-5 Draft, no minor or major league free agency ... once you are a professional baseball player, you stay in that organization. This series shows how all 30 teams would look. We give you: Homegrown teams. To view the schedule/past entries of this feature, click here.

The most interesting thing about our latest installment in this series is that I believe this would have been one of the better teams in the majors had we done the exercise three or four years ago. How good would a Johan Santana, Roy Oswalt, Freddy Garcia top three in the rotation have been a handful of years ago -- along with Lance Berkman, Hunter Pence and Bobby Abreu leading the offense? Alas, we're doing it now and some of that sounds far less enticing. Still, let's check it out.

Lineup

1. Hunter Pence, CF
2. Jose Altuve, 2B
3. Ben Zobrist, RF
4. Lance Berkman, LF
5. Bobby Abreu, 1B
6. Chris Johnson, 3B
7. John Buck, C
8. Aaron Miles, SS

Starting Rotation

1. Johan Santana
2. Roy Oswalt
3. Wandy Rodriguez
4. Bud Norris
5. Jordan Lyles

Bullpen

Closer - Brad Lidge
Set up - Chad Qualls, Matt Albers, Troy Patton, Fernando Abad,
Long - Felipe Paulino, Freddy Garcia

Notable Bench Players

Ramon Castro, Carlos Guillen, Drew Sutton, Brooks Conrad, Brian Bogusevic

What's Good?

The trio of Pence, Zobrist and Berkman makes the front part of the offense look really attractive and Abreu offers decent protection for the Puma. Fitting in that two-hole would also do wonders for the development of the young Altuve. Can we assume health in this exercise, considering it's for fun? Sure, I will. So the starting rotation looks pretty good -- albeit not dominant anymore -- with Johan as the ace and Oswalt a good number two (remember, back issues hampered him last year). If Lyles isn't ready yet, we can plug in Garcia or Paulino as the five.

What's Not?

Lidge and Qualls aren't bad, but there is nothing in front of them worth much except two starting pitchers -- and, again, we may need one of the two in the rotation. The bottom part of the batting order isn't very good either and the bench is thin. But let's focus on what is really bad: The defense. I fought back and forth with whether to put Abreu or Berkman in LF, but either one is a bad choice. I just feel like Berkman can move better at this point. I also had to shift Pence to center, even though he's better suited in right. Miles is much better used at second base and he's not even really good there.

Comparison to real 2011

Well, the 2011 Astros were the worst team in the majors and in franchise history. This team isn't particularly good, but it's better than that. With that rotation, a decent back-end of the bullpen and some offense, these Astros should be able to work close to the 75-win range. One thing is for sure, they wouldn't be the worst team in the NL Central. I also feel like the best news for Astros fans is there would actually be some name players here to root for, after having seen the likes of Oswalt, Berkman, Pence and Michael Bourn traded over the past two real seasons. Still, you can't help but think that there are enough pieces here that the Astros could have properly built a real-life team that was still in contention in 2011 -- had they made the right moves.

Next: Los Angeles Dodgers

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Posted on: September 19, 2011 12:11 pm
Edited on: September 19, 2011 12:20 pm
 

R.I.P.: 2011 Houston Astros

By Matt Snyder

Another season gone, another disappointment for 29 teams as one is immortalized forever. Let’s take a look back at 2011 and forward in Eye on Baseball’s R.I.P. series...

Team name: Houston Astros
Record: 52-100, 37.5 games back in NL Central
Manager: Brad Mills
Best hitter: Carlos Lee -- .277/.338/.455 with 18 HR, 86 RBI, 59 R, 36 2B
Best pitcher: Wandy Rodriguez -- 11-10, 3.55 ERA, 1.32 WHIP, 177 2/3 IP, 160 K

Unfortunately for the Astros, leading off the R.I.P. series means they're the worst team in baseball. So the biggest theme of the 2011 season in Houston was losing. They've already set a franchise record with 100 losses and could creep up on the MLB list of most losses in history with a bad final week and a half. The "best hitter" listed above is by default because both Michael Bourn and Hunter Pence were traded at the deadline. With the ownership situation in limbo -- Jim Crane still hasn't been approved -- it's hard to tell what direction the Astros will take in the future. One would expect promising youngsters like Jose Altuve and Jordan Lyles to lead a youth movement.

2011 SEASON RECAP

It was pretty forgettable from Day 1, when the Astros blew a ninth-inning lead against the Phillies. The Astros would open the season 0-5 and never get back to .500 -- the closest they got was when they were 7-11. Perhaps unbelievably, they did win the season series against the defending champion Giants (four games to three). They also took two of three from the Blue Jays, but didn't have a winning record against anyone else. The best month was August, when the Astros went 12-17. So that pretty much sums it up.

Seeing the writing on the wall, Astros GM Ed Wade dealt Bourn and Pence before the non-waiver trade deadline in July for some prospects. He also traded Jeff Keppinger. There was a youth movement from about the middle of the season on, but it's a pretty lackluster movement, as the system simply isn't stocked with much talent -- for example, in Baseball Prospectus' midseason top 50 prospects, Altuve was No. 42. He was the only Astros prospect on the list. The preseason top 101 only had two Astros, with Lyles at 59 being the top prospect in the system.

Basically, they have a long way to go in order to get back to respectability, and I'd venture to guess the overwhelming majority of Astros fans would even admit as much. Whenever there's an ownership change, they need to start over. The mantra should be to clean house and build a foundation from the ground (low-level minor leagues) up ...

2012 AUDIT

Which leads us here. Can the Astros compete in 2012? We obviously have no way of knowing exactly what's going to go down in the offseason, but it's hard to see the team being much improved by next season. Most of the young players either aren't very impressive or aren't yet ready. The veterans  still on the roster are either not very good or past their respective primes -- which is why they weren't traded like Bourn and Pence.

As you can see below, there isn't really any money coming off the books from the current club, though dealing Bourn and Pence did help matters a bit there. Still, it's unlikely the Astros have tons of money to burn on free agency, so the team will have to improve either internally, or through trading veterans like Brett Myers, Lee or Rodriguez. Considering the salaries of each player compared to production, they aren't going to land enough back to immediately make a drastic improvement.

Unless the youngsters all make huge leaps, it's entirely possible the Astros are again the worst team in baseball in 2012.

FREE AGENTS

Clint Barmes, 2B
Jason Michaels, OF

OFFSEASON FOCUS

As stated above, there has to be a complete makeover of the entire organization. Minor-league player development and a youth movement should continue to be the focus. Even if new ownership is firmly in place before free agency and opens the floodgates with spending -- which is, again, unlikely -- there isn't enough in place to make the team competitive with big signings. For example, say the Astros land Prince Fielder, Jose Reyes and C.J. Wilson. (I'll pause for laughter). That still isn't a playoff team. It would be like putting a band-aid on a broken leg, and by the time the youth movement was ready to help those three, they might not be in their prime anymore.

Instead, a much better road map would be to follow the Royals' plan. Fill in holes with temporary players while waiting on the prospects from the low levels of the minors like Delino DeShields Jr. (2B), Jonathan Singleton (1B), Chris Wallace (C) and Jarred Cosart (SP) to develop. Meanwhile Lyles, Altuve, Jimmy Paredes, J.D. Martinez and others already in the bigs need to continue to develop. Of course, the Royals had the best farm system in baseball heading into this season while the Astros were ranked in the bottom five by most outlets. So, again, that's where the focus should be for the next few years. The entire system should be revamped.

So if I was the incoming Astros owner, here's what I'd hope to do:
  • Try to lure Andrew Friedman back home -- he was born and raised in Houston -- and give him the title President of Baseball Operations. He's helped work wonders with the Rays, so it's pretty easy to trust he can build a farm system basically from scratch.
  • Trade Myers, Rodriguez and Lee for whatever prospects they can bring back, even if it meant eating some of the salary. A three-to-five year plan should be put in place, so you need to play young players and see who can hack it at the big-league level. Aging veterans only take away spots from the young players.
  • Put an excellent coaching staff in place with an emphasis on player development. The focus has to be on the foundation before the big-league club at this point. It's far too much a mess to solve in one offseason.
For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: August 14, 2011 11:49 pm
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Belt belts two home runs

Belt

By Evan Brunell

Jack McKeon, Marlins:  Giants first baseman Brandon Belt showed the Giants (and opponent Florida) that if Aubrey Huff's recent resurgence isn't for real, the Giants will be just fine. Belt... well, "belted" two solo home runs on Sunday to pace San Francisco over the Marlins. Ryan Vogelsong won his 10th, trimming his ERA to 2.47. But neither of them get the prize -- that goes to Marlins manager Jack McKeon, who told the Associated Press that there was no bad blood between the two teams as a result of the Buster Posey broken leg suffered at the hands of Scott Cousins earlier in the year. "Guys get carried away," McKeon said. "Vogel ... Volkswagen ... whatever his name is -- he's lucky he didn't have to face Drysdale or Gibson or one of those guys. You would get a shave and a haircut real quick."

Brett Lawrie, Blue Jays: Boy, is Toronto sure glad it finally called up Brett Lawrie. The rookie has been hot so far in his early career, and delivered a game-tying double in the ninth inning that the Blue Jays would go on to win the next inning. It was his only hit in four trips to the plate, but Lawrie's already shown a knack for getting pivotal hits and is hitting .355 on the year. He's rallied the troops by wearing his heart on his sleeve and is quickly becoming a fan favorite.

Nick Markakis, Orioles: Markakis has been a major disappointment not just this season, but for a few years now. Markakis followed up two strong years with his best season yet in 2008 as a 24-year-old, raking 48 doubles and 20 home runs with a .306/.406/.491 mark, but he tumbled off by close to 100 points in OPS over the next two seasons. This year's been even worse, as he came into Sunday's game against Detroit with a .280/.333/.391 mark. He exacted some measure of help Sunday by going 3 for 5 with a home run, two runs scored and four RBI. It's something.



Jason Marquis, Diamondbacks: Marquis' first two starts for the Diamondbacks didn't go too well, giving up eight runs (seven earned) in four innings two starts ago, following that up with another four-inning stint, coughing up seven runs (four earned). That made Sunday promising, as Marquis had given up one run through 3 1/3, but a line drive off his shin the inning previous flared up all of a sudden and he tumbled to the ground in a heap -- as did batter Josh Thole, who was plunked by Marquis' errant pitch when he took a dive. The diagnosis? Broken shin. Ouch.

Jordan Lyles, Astros: Lyles had a tough opponent in Hiroki Kuroda, who hurled seven scoreless, but Lyles didn't help matters by blowing up for seven runs in 5 1/3 innings. It's the second straight time that Lyles has given up seven runs, and he drops to an unsightly 1-7 on the year and his career. His 5.32 ERA belies a pitcher that might need some more seasoning in the minors, but he's also just 20, and there's plenty better things on the horizon for the right-hander.

Jeff Francis, Royals: Leading up to the trade deadline, Francis was looking like a nice left-hander to slot in the middle of the rotation, especially in the NL. Alas, since then he's been anything but and turned in a six-run outing in just 3 2/3 innings, balls rifling all over the park with 10 hits. Francis also walked two and struck out just one in what was just an overall bad day at the park. His ERA is all the way up to 4.76 now and that luster? It's gone.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeonBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: June 13, 2011 10:04 am
Edited on: June 13, 2011 4:32 pm
 

Pepper: Morrison wants Superman cape for Stanton



What does a sweep of the Cardinals mean for Milwaukee and the rest of the NL Central? MLB.com's Tom Boorstein joins Scott Braun to talk about the Brewers and to look ahead to some of Monday night's action.

By Evan Brunell

BATMAN AND ROBIN: As the All-Star Break edges closer and closer, Marlins left-fielder Logan Morrison has a pretty good idea of who should be part of the Home Run Derby, which is popular with players and fans.

That would be Mike Stanton, who has admitted that several of his 16 home runs this season went out of the park only because he made contact, not because he hit the ball on the sweet spot. That's some serious power from the youngster, and Morrison wants to see what he can do on the national stage -- plus ride his coattails.

“I told him if he goes, I get to be on the field to be the towel-and-Gatorade boy. I get the on-field mic," Morrison said. "‘So, Mike, tell me, how does it feel to hit 16 home runs and only square up one?’”

Then there was this classic exchange when Stanton was asked if he would participate in the Home Run Derby, a nice peek into the personalities of Morrison and Stanton as transcribed by Matt Porter:

MS: “I don’t know, I’d have to see … once they --”
LM: “Yes. You would, because I’d have to be on the field.”
MS: [Disapproving look]
LM: “Hey man, coattails. Don’t leave 'em long if you don’t like it.”
LM: “We need a cape.”

Reporter, filling in Stanton on a prior conversation: “He wants you to wear a cape.”

MS: “OK, if he buys it. What kind of cape?”
LM: “Like a Superman cape.”
LM: “And I’ll have the Wonder Woman outfit.”
MS: “You gotta wear the short-shorts then.”
LM: “Heck yeah!
LM: “Or Batman, and I’ll be Robin.”
MS: “You kinda look like Robin. An oversize Robin.”
LM: “You know Mike, what we should do is get you an extra jersey, and cut the sleeves off and go like Jose Canseco in batting practice or something. Tear-away sleeves.” 

The Derby these days tends to be an over-inflated reality show that drags on with all manner of distractions, but it's really cool to see two young stars of baseball banter back and forth like this. Plus, the more Logan Morrison, the better.

DRUG RING: Livan Hernandez is linked to drug kingpin Angel Ayala-Vazquez from Puerto Rico, the leader of the top drug trafficking organization. The right-hander is currently being investigated as a "straw buyer," where a person purchases products for another in his own name, which allows proceeds from drug trafficking to be hidden. U.S. attorneys have said charges are likely coming against Hernandez. (Washington Times)

WRIGLEY IS A DUMP
: After Peter Gammons referred to Wrigley Field as "a dump" that requires a $200 million renovation, White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen couldn't agree fast enough. "He did? Good for you, Peter," Guillen said with a laugh. "Finally, somebody else out-tagged me. Why do you say that, Peter? You have only been to Wrigley Field for a few days. You're not at Wrigley Field all of the time. That's why Peter is one of the brightest men in baseball." (Chicago Tribune)

MARQUIS WANTS TO STAY
: Starting pitcher Jason Marquis wants to stay in Washington as he sees good things coming with the up-and-coming team. One of the worst pitchers in the game last season, Marquis is now somehow 7-2 with a 3.67 ERA, so he's making a case for the Nats to extend him. (MLB.com)

RIZZO TURNING HEADS
: Anthony Rizzo blasted his first career home run by sending a ball over the right-field fence. How rare is that? The Padres calculated that only 28 percent of all home runs at Petco (which are already a difficult place to hit) have headed to the right-field seats. That's the potential Rizzo has, who also appears to be well-adjusted off the field. (MLB.com)

CHIPPED WOOD
: Kerry Wood appears headed to the disabled list as his blister problems have increased. Wood missed three weeks in 2008 because of a finger blister and could be in line for a similar amount of missed time. (page/CHC">Cubs%29">Chicago Tribune)

LYLES STAYING: Twenty-year-old rookie Jordan Lyles is now a permanent member of the Astros' rotation. When Wandy Rodriguez returns to start Monday, reliever Jeff Fulchino will be optioned with Aneury Rodriguez making room in the rotation by moving to the bullpen. That leaves Lyles in the rotation after making the first three starts of his career. (Houston Chronicle)

8,000 MILES: The Angels are about to embark on a "Four Corners" trip in which they will go from Los Angeles to Seattle, New York, Florida and back to L.A. which will span more than 8,000 miles with 12 games in 14 days. (Orange County Register)

MANAGER ERSTAD: Darin Erstad is the new manager at the University of Nebraska, and he plans to bring his style of game to the team. That means outright hustle, starting with the run to first base. (Orange County Register)

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: June 5, 2011 10:54 pm
Edited on: June 6, 2011 12:40 pm
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Duensing leads hot Twins to sweep



By Matt Snyder

Brian Duensing, Twins. Don't look now, but the Twins just swept the Royals in four games and are threatening to yield the league's worst record to the Astros. They're only one game back -- that is, if there were standings for all of the MLB. Sunday, Brian Duensing took center stage for the all-of-a-sudden hot Twins. He dazzled in eight innings, giving up only six hits and a walk. The Twins still trail the Indians by 12 1/2 games, but it's not near as bad as it was a week ago.

Chad Billingsley, Dodgers. He labored through five innings, allowing eight hits, three walks and four runs -- so why is he here? Billingsley starred at the dish for the Dodgers. He hit a solo home run in his first at-bat, took a bases-loaded walk his second time up and finished things off with an RBI double. That's quite a day for a guy who entered Sunday with a career .137 batting average and 15 RBI. He's now hitting .304 in 2011 with four extra-base hits, however, so he's definitely improved substantially with the stick.

Josh Wilson, Brewers. The journeyman entered Sunday with almost as many teams (seven) as career home runs (eight). His career .318 slugging percentage gives us some idea of his power prowess. Sunday afternoon, though, Wilson clubbed a home run to left-center field in the top of the 11th, which proved the ultimate difference in the Brewers' 6-5 extra-innings victory. The win was the third straight for the Brewers, who entered the series with a 9-19 road record. Wilson now has two homers in eight at-bats for the Brewers. Prior to joining them, he had just seven homers in 930 career plate appearances.




Top of 11th inning for Arizona. It took the Diamondbacks a three-run ninth inning to force extras against the Nationals, but the top of the 11th was disastrous and proved too much for the Snakes. A single and sac bunt started things rather innocently before a blown call at first base allowed Roger Bernadina on. Then the Nats decided to intentionally walk Jayson Werth and take on Rick Ankiel instead. But pitcher Joe Paterson walked Ankiel, too, forcing in the go-ahead run. For good measure, Paterson then coughed up a grand slam to Mike Morse -- who is one of the more underrated hitters in the league at this point. The umpire, the decision to intentionally load the bases and Paterson all count as "down" issues here.

Jordan Lyles, Astros. Wandy Rodriguez is due back June 13 and the Astros aren't going to a six-man rotation. When he returns, basically the only options are Lyles being demoted back to the minors or Aneury Rodriguez moving to the bullpen. Outings like Sunday won't help the 20-year-old Lyles' cause. He was up in the strike zone all day and lasted only four innings -- giving up five hits and four earned runs. He only walked one, but needed 96 pitches just to get through his four frames. He'll get one more shot to prove to the Astros -- and maybe even himself -- that he belongs in the bigs and doesn't need more minor-league seasoning.

Tim Hudson, Braves. He was torched by the Mets in Citi Field, coughing up seven hits and five earned runs in just four innings. It marked just the seventh time in Hudson's last 108 starts he didn't work into the fifth inning (thanks to Mark Bowman for the stat). The Braves have now lost four of six.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 1, 2011 3:02 pm
Edited on: June 1, 2011 3:23 pm
 

White Sox stick with six, Astros say no

By Matt Snyder

The White Sox expanded their rotation to include six pitchers when Jake Peavy came off the disabled list and Phil Humber emerged as one of their more effective starting pitchers. Six pitchers in the rotation is certainly unconventional and many around baseball scoffed at the notion. But the experiment has worked well enough that the White Sox will continue to stick with six.

Meanwhile, top Astros prospect Jordan Lyles sparkled in his debut Tuesday night against the Cubs and ace Wandy Rodriguez is due back soon from the disabled list. After seeing the White Sox pull off the maneuver with relative success, some reporters asked Astros manager Brad Mills about employing the same tactic. He said that's not an option.

"It’s awful hard because you’ve taken a guy out of your bullpen now to do that," Mills said. "I just think that’s really difficult to do. You’re changing a whole process of what these guys have done their whole career. It’s almost like you’re trying to reinvent the wheel to an extent." (Ultimate Astros)

The White Sox aren't planning on sticking with the alignment for the entire season, as the Chicago Tribune reports a transition back to a traditional five-man rotation will take place "no later than the second half of the season because of days off on July 21 and 28."

In the meantime, the White Sox have pushed back struggling John Danks a day and will use Jake Peavy Sunday against the Tigers.

As for the Astros, they'll have a decision to make if Lyles has a solid second start Sunday against the light-hitting Padres. You know Rodriguez, J.A. Happ, Bud Norris and Brett Myers aren't going anywhere. It would be awfully tough to demote Lyles after seeing his promise -- again, assuming a good outing Sunday -- and that leaves Aneury Rodriguez. Being a Rule 5 pick, Rodriguez cannot be optioned to the minors without being returned to his former team (Rays), so the Astros would instead have to move him to the bullpen and option someone else.

The situations are both interesting in that it's good to have guys step into the rotation and perform well, but there are also veterans like Myers and Danks underperforming, which compounds the issue. With all the money and options and every other complication, it's nowhere near a simple meritocracy.

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Posted on: May 31, 2011 4:37 pm
Edited on: May 31, 2011 7:20 pm
 

On Deck: Sweet Vogelsong



By C. Trent Rosecrans
 

Ryan VogelsongWHO'S THE UNDERDOG? One pitcher has a Cy Young Award on his shelf and two other top-three finishes in the voting, the other has three years of experience in Japan and went nearly seven years between winning starts in the big leagues. Yet, this season the Giants' Ryan Vogelsong is 3-1 with a 1.77 ERA this year and 2-1 with a 0.34 ERA in his last four starts, while Chris Carpenter is 1-5 with a 4.58 ERA. The Cardinals have gone 2-9 in Carpneter's 11 starts this season and winless when he starts at Busch Stadium. Giants at Cardinals, 7:09 p.m. ET (Watch live)

Jordan LylesLYLES DEBUTS: Houston's top prospect, Jordan Lyles, will make his debut tonight at Wrigley Field against the Cubs. The 20-year-old right-hander is pitching in Wandy Rodriguez's spot and will start at least two games, tonight and then Sunday at Petco Park against the Padres. At Triple-A Oklahoma City, he's gone 3-3 with a 3.20 ERA, including six shutout innings in his last start. While he has a good fastball, it's Lyle's changeup and slider that get scouts excited. Astros at Cubs, 8:05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

Erik BedardAdam JonesFAMILIAR FACES: It was one of the biggest trades offseason leading up to 2008, and for so long it appeared the Orioles got by far the better deal with the Mariners, as center fielder Adam Jones made the All-Star team in 2009 and a Gold Glove, while Erik Bedard was limited to just 15 starts in each of his first two seasons in Seattle before missing all of 2010 as a result of labrum surgery in 2009. Bedard has been impressive so far this year, going 3-4 with a 3.48 ERA, and 3-0 with a 1.09 ERA in his last five starts. Jones is 2 for 5 with a double in his career against Bedard. Orioles at Mariners, 10:10 p.m. ET (Watch live)

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com