Tag:Mark Attanasio
Posted on: March 8, 2012 10:48 pm
 

Brewers to make a pitch for Greinke extension

Zack Greinke

By C. Trent Rosecrans


At this point of the season, there's little reason to worry much about free agency -- there's a lot more things to happen before it's an issue. But during the long six weeks of real nothingness that is spring training, most of the free agents-to-be will be asked about their impending status.

Brewers right-hander Zack Greinke is today's subject. In Brewers camp, the 28-year-old was asked about his plans after this season. While, as is customary in this dance, Greinke said he was interested in re-signing with Milwaukee, he also acknowledged the possibility of listening to offers.

Greinke is currently without an agent, but said he'd hire a new one after the season -- thus insinuating he's not going to sign with the Brewers before testing the free-agent waters.

"I think it would be kind of neat. There could be positives to it, and there could end up being negatives. It’s not like everyone who gets to free agency, it ends up working perfectly for them, and everything comes true that they want," Greinke told Tom Haurdricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. "Sometimes it ends up backfiring on you and you would have been better off signing with your team. A lot of times, when you get all 30 teams fighting for you, you should be in a pretty good situation. It has happened where it doesn’t work out for people."

That kind of statement sows the seeds in the mind of the Brewers' brass that he could re-sign with the Brewers before he's eligible for free agency. He noted that owner Mark Attanasio and general manager Doug Melvin are expected to meet this weekend to talk about an extension with Greinke.

Said Melvin (again, via the Journal Sentinel): "Mark and I have to talk first," said Melvin. "We won't let (having no agent) stop us if we decide to talk to him. There's no timetable to do it. We haven't set any timetable. We definitely have to have a conversation (with Greinke) before the season starts. I'd like to be able to do that."

That said, he should be, along with Cole Hamels and Matt Cain, the prize of the free-agent market this coming winter. No matter what is said now, there's a lot more money available after the season than before it. The Brewers will certainly make an offer, but that doesn't guarantee much, if anything.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS feed and "like" us on Facebook.

Sign  up for the CBSSports.com MLB Daily Newsletter.
Posted on: October 17, 2011 3:45 am
 

Fielder's time in Milwaukee likely over



By C. Trent Rosecrans

There was a Fielder crying in the clubhouse after the Brewers' season was ended on Sunday night in Game 6 of the NLCS, but it wasn't the biggest Fielder. No, Prince Fielder had a bemused smile on his face and was telling his son, Jadyn, that everything would be OK.

In the eyes of a 6-year-old, you can understand. His favorite team just lost and everyone tells him his dad is leaving the only home he's known. He's going to go to some different team, play in a different city and Jadyn will have to find new friends and live in a new world. That's big stuff when you're 6.

Full playoff coverage

Fielder comforted his son, keeping his own eyes dry -- something not all of his teammates could claim. This was more than likely Fielder's last game at Miller Park in a Brewers uniform. The 27-year-old will be one of the game's most sought-after free agents this season and will sign a contract that should make him an even richer young man.

Fielder, at times, has said he's "probably" going to play somewhere else next season and the Brewers are saying all the right things about trying to keep him ("We're planning on participating in the sweepstakes," principle owner Mark Attanasio said after the game). But nobody really expects Milwaukee, which has already ponied up $141.5 million through 2020 from Braun, to keep Fielder in Milwaukee.

The Brewer fans gave him a standing ovation when he came to the plate a final time at Miller Park in the eighth inning -- and Cardinals first baseman Albert Pujols (who will receive a pay bump of his own after this season is done), called time out right before Lance Lynn's first pitch so that the fans could have a little longer to pay their respects for Fielder.

"It was awesome, just because… playing here was awesome," Fielder said. "I'm just glad I was able to have the amount of fun I had. It was cool. It was cool."

During his postgame news conference, a reporter did follow-up and ask him about his choice of tenses when talking about his time in Milwaukee.

"No, as far as this year, it's over," he clarified. "This year is over. Why are you trying to do that?"

He did add, on a subsequent question -- "Hopefully I'm here for more years to come, but if not, it's been cool."

His teammates -- or soon-to-be-former teammates -- know the score. The small-market Brewers can't afford the large-ticket price Prince. The Brewers picked their prince in Braun, so Fielder will need to move on and a squire will take his place.

"Everybody recognizes the situation, everybody understands circumstances and we'll see what happens," Braun said. "Regardless of what happens, what he's been able to accomplish here in the last six years is incredible. He's one of the greatest players in franchise history, one of the best teammates in the league, an incredible competitor and I'm proud to say I was able to be teammates with him for five years."

Fielder said all the right things -- he's thinking about returning, he loved Milwaukee -- all that. But free agency and big dollars speak other things, they'll likely lead the player the Brewers drafted in the first round of the 2002 draft to another organization. No matter what's said, actions mean more.

Haven, Fielder's other son, though, probably had the more fitting symbolic act than his older brother, as he took a giant stuffed Sully from the movie Monster's Inc. and the inspiration for the "Beast Mode" celebration decked out in a Brewers jersey out the clubhouse door.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: October 17, 2011 3:38 am
 

Overheard: NLCS Game 6



By C. Trent Rosecrans

MILWAUKEE -- You always see the images of the winning team's clubhouses at the end of a series, but never the losing side. What flows like the champagne on the other side is hugs. Players hug each other, at times going down a receiving line of hugs. Each of the Brewers on Sunday hugged it out as the team realized its 2011 season was over.

There were kids -- from Prince Fielder's sons, to Jerry Hairston's -- they got hugs too. There were tears, from players, from sons. And there were hugs.

But still, there are smiles. A group of players realize their season is done, but there are worse ways to end a season than in the playoffs. 

Full playoff coverage

"Ultimately we fell short of our goal, which is disappointing, but in due time we'll be able to look back and appreciate our accomplishments," Brewers right fielder Ryan Braun said.

There was little bitterness, just acceptance that defeat was earned and the other team will be moving on to the World Series.

"Really, no knock on our defense, no knock on our pitching, but they flat-out beat us -- period," Hairston said. "We ran into a hot team, a great team. They deserve to be in the World Series, no question about it. They deserve it, they won it. Once you get to the final four, just about anybody can kick in and win the whole thing. They deserved to represent the National League in the World Series."

Also overheard after Game 6:

• Robin Yount, Brewers Hall of Famer, on losing to the Cardinals: "I was hoping to get a little playback for '82, but we didn't get it. I'm still bitter about that series."

• Tony La Russa on allowing himself to digest this incredible run the Cardinals have put together: "No. Because one of the keys is you can never allow yourself to look back because that's a distraction. We remind ourselves, even today we went around different players, it's always about maintain your edge the next game you play. Even if you for a minute do either one, look ahead or look back, you lose an edge. The guys were just absolutely relentless about today, today, today, last game of our lives."

• Albert Pujols on advancing to the World Series:  "It's awesome but your goal is to win it. Nobody talks about second place. Everybody talks about who wins it. That's going to be our main goal."

• Cardinals closer Jason Motte on Adam Wainwright's injury this spring: "It was a terrible loss. But as a team, we knew someone had to step up and do the job, get us some innings. It was an up and down season, but it wasn't just when Adam went down. Albert was hurt, Berkman, Holliday ... you name it, guys have been hurt."

• Shaun Marcum in the team's pitching in the playoffs: "One of the things that got us here was consistency, we were able to be consistent almost all year long and hand the ball over to the bullpen all year long. And aside from the starts by Yovani (Gallardo) and the one by Randy (Wolf), we didn't do a very good job of that. But we've got to give those guys credit, they're not the top-scoring offense in the league for no reason."

• Nyjer Morgan on the postseason: "It sucks when you get down and then when we swing the bats and then they put more (runs) up. Sometimes the game's going to go like that. Dr. Freeze came along at the wrong time and started chilling people's bats out, man. We've just got to keep our heads up, but looking back at it all, 101 wins, a franchise record, and a bunch of men in here that went to battle every night for the last eight months, you can't say enough about that. Everybody did what they were supposed to do, but they fell short."

• Morgan on Prince Fielder returning: "I'm hoping so, mang. Plush can't spit on that one, I'll leave that for the agents and everybody else to talk about that one. Of course I want the big man to come back, but I hope he does, but that's not for me to speculate on that, but, you know, T Plush wants my boy back."

• Brewers owner Mark Attanasio: "You can see the way Tony La Russa managed against us with a lot of urgency, you know, I'm going to view that as a sign of respect. If he brings his closer in with a six-run lead, he realizes we've scored six runs against them before. I think he's showing us respect for that. It's bitter-sweet part -- the bitter part is it's very, very hard to lose when you get this far with a team this good, but as bitter as that is, I'm proud of these guys."

• Attanasio on the Cardinals: "We and the Cardinals compete very hard, there's a lot of extraneous commentary, but I think you saw a very toughly played series -- what did we play 24 times? I guess 13 times we were on the wrong side of it -- 13-11. You give them credit, they played great."

• Attanasio on missing their shot at a World Series: "(General manager) Doug (Melvin) and I don't look at it that way. My goal has always been to build a long-term winning tradition here. I think we're off to a great start, especially being in the playoffs two times in the last four years. I'm not looking at 1982, I'm looking at right now. We've been in the playoffs the last two years and that's what we're trying to build in Milwaukee. And importantly, the whole country, including other athletes, are seeing what we're trying to do here. This is a great place to play. I think this is going to help us recruit ballplayers and we're not looking at this as our last shot."

• Brewers utility man Craig Counsell on his future: "I want to get away from it a little bit and then we'll sit down and make a decision. I've always said I'll play until they say no. You question when you're hitting .170 and you're 41 years old, you question yourself, there's no doubt. There's still that tug that you've got a great job and you love coming to work every day, so we'll think about it a little more in the winter."

• Ryan Braun on watching the World Series: "I doubt it. I'll probably get away from baseball for a while."

• Braun on the being called out on a play at first in the fifth inning of Game 6: "I don't know if it was necessarily a turning point our not. It's a tough play for an umpire -- I was safe -- but I'm going to give Albert credit, he made a great play on that. I don't think it was a turning point, but it seemed indicative of everything that happened this series -- they clearly played better than us, but every play went their way, every call went their way and I think when you end up winning games and winning a series, you look back and there are always things that go your way. When you lose, you look back and feel like everything went against you. That's just how the game works sometimes."

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: April 21, 2011 11:47 pm
 

Werner, Attanasio, Wolff deny interest in Dodgers

By Evan Brunell

AttanasioEver since Bud Selig announced a hostile takeover of the Dodgers, speculation has run rampant on who the next owner of the Dodgers would be if Selig is successful at pushing Frank McCourt out.

Red Sox chairman Tom Werner already flatly denied rumors and two other current owners have joined him.

Brewers owner Mark Attanasio, who is from Los Angeles, said he has no interest in taking the Dodgers over.  "It's great to be here. My wife and my family just moved into a new place in downtown Milwaukee, and we're excited to be part of the city and building what we hope is a championship team here," he told MLB.com.

Attanasio was available to reporters Wednesday as news broke that the club signed Ryan Braun to a five-year extension covering the years 2016-2020, which Attanasio also pointed out should be proof positive of his commitment to Milwaukee.

Oakland owner Lew Wolff joined Attanasio in giving a flat no when asked if he would take on the Dodgers. Wolff has been battling for over two years to move to San Jose, with the Giants resisting as is their right given S.F. holds territorial rights to San Jose. Although the deal is expected to eventually be pushed through by Selig, Wolff has grown frustrated by the endeavor.

That doesn't mean he plans to abandon the A's, though, as the Los Angeles Times reports.

"My focus is deep into getting us a new venue for the A's," Wolff said. "That's where my long term is."

There is one other name inside baseball that could end up with the Dodgers -- White Sox executive Dennis Gilbert tried and failed to get the Rangers last year and could cast his aspirations on the Dodgers. Given his stature in the game, Gilbert would likely find an easy road toward taking over L.A. and may have an investment group lined up, ready to go.

He'll have some competition as former All-Star Dodgers first baseman Steve Garvey is throught to be trying to assemble a group. And of course, whenever there's a baseball team available for sale, one must bring up basketball owner Mark Cuban. Cuban didn't respond to an e-mail from the Times for a statement, but has expressed interest in the Dodgers previously. However, after losing out on the Rangers, Cuban said he would no longer participate as the active owner for purchasing a club; rather, he would have to be approached. It appears Cuban is growing frustrated with MLB's gambit to keep him out of the league after also falling short for the Cubs.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 
Posted on: November 2, 2010 9:44 am
Edited on: November 2, 2010 9:44 am
 

Brewers still deciding on manager

The Brewers are still doing their homework on their four managerial candidates, owner Mark Attansaio told Tom Haudricourt of the Journal Sentinel .

In an e-mail Attansio said the Brewers are "finalizing the collection of information and discussions" about their next manager.

The Brewers are down to four candidates, Bobby Velentine, Bob Melvin, Joey Cora and Ron Reonicke.

Haudricourt writes that general manager Doug Melvin is a "backer" of Valentine, but he'll cost the most.

Also, Journal Sentinel business writer Don Walker wrote that Valentine's contract with ESPN stipulates he must give the news to ESPN first if he accepts a managerial job.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: October 30, 2010 10:19 pm
 

Brewers owner says no manager pick yet

There have been plenty of reports that the Brewers have decided to hire Bobby Valentine, but the Journal Sentinel 's Tom Haudricourt throws a "not so fast" into the fire .

Haudricourt writes that Brewers owner Mark Attanasio passed on a message to him that the Brewers haven't made a decision yet. He goes on to write that Attanasio hasn't had time to meet with general manager Doug Melvin and assistant Gord Ash to make the final decision.

According to Haudricourt, none of the final four -- Valentine, Bob Melvin, Joey Cora and Ron Roenicke -- have been eliminated yet.

Still, it will hardly be a surprise if Valentine is the pick. If the announcement isn't Tuesday, it will be after the World Series.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com