Tag:Red Sox
Posted on: February 27, 2012 2:52 pm
Edited on: February 27, 2012 3:25 pm
 

Bobby V. fires back at Terry Francona

Bobby Valentine

By C. Trent Rosecrans


Well, earlier Monday former Red Sox manager Terry Francona said the Red Sox ban on alcohol in the clubhouse was a "PR move." Current Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine didn't give a "PR" or "PC" response.

"Remember," Valentine told reporters, including the Boston Herald's Scott Lauber, "you're getting paid over there for saying stuff. You get paid over here for doing stuff. I've done both."

It should be noted, Francona's done both too -- and has two more rings than Valentine.

Valentine continued -- "How was it PR?" he asked. "It means like 20 teams are looking for PR and that's why they're making good decisions."

Valentine did say he had the same rule in his last big-league managerial job with the Mets.

With ESPN's penchant to overblow everything Red Sox and Francona on its payroll, it's safe to say this won't be the last time Francona is asked about a Boston controversy -- and Valentine will object to whatever is said. Valentine is always entertaining, and with Francona in his new gig and a microscope on both, there should be plenty of fun for onlookers this season.

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Posted on: February 27, 2012 11:10 am
 

Francona says Boston's beer ban 'a PR move'

Terry FranconaBy C. Trent Rosecrans

As an analyst at ESPN, former Red Sox manager Terry Francona is in a bit of an awkward spot when asked about his former team -- especially Monday when he was asked about Bobby Valentine's new ban on alcohol in the team's clubhouse.

Appearing on ESPN Radio's "Mike and Mike in the Morning" show (via ESPN), Francona said he wasn't surprised the new manager nixed postgame beers after last season's late-season collapse that was blamed, in part, to starting pitchers drinking beer and eating fried chicken in the clubhouse during games.

"I don't think it's a surprise that they put this in effect, or the fact they announced it," Francona said on Monday. "It's probably more of a PR move just because, you know, the Red Sox [took] such a beating at the end of the year."

He's right, it's mostly a PR move -- but one that probably had to happen. Francona also said he wasn't sure it would curb players drinking.

"I think if a guy wants a beer, he can probably get one," Francona said. "You know, it's kind of the old rule … If your coach in football says no hard liquor on the plane -- I mean, you serve beer and wine -- somebody's going to sneak liquor on the plane. If you furnish a little bit, it almost keeps it to a minimum."

Francona, though, stopped short of criticizing Valentine's decision.

"You look back at this, these are guys that earned my implicit trust," Francona said. "You know, guys that we had won World Series with.

"So I probably felt different about it than a new guy coming in. And he certainly has the right to do what he wants, because he is new, and that's why you get different people."

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Posted on: February 25, 2012 5:45 pm
 

Mike Aviles has not been traded

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Twitter is an amazing tool that can deliver news quickly and efficiently. But sometimes things aren't as they seem on Twitter.

Saturday afternoon, a Twitter account that claimed to be from Red Sox shortstop Mike Aviles said he'd been traded to the Rays. It was assumed, by many, to be real and retweeted. Really, what could be better word than from the horse's mouth?

Mike Aviles

Except, it's not the right horse.

According to several reporters, including Pete Abraham of the Boston Globe, confirmed with Aviles that the account doesn't belong to him. Aviles is not on Twitter, he told reporters.

With Twitter, as in everything else, let the buyer beware.

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Posted on: February 25, 2012 3:16 pm
Edited on: February 25, 2012 4:53 pm
 

Red Sox ban alcohol in the clubhouse

Bobby Valentine

By C. Trent Rosecrans


There'll be no beer in the Red Sox clubhouse this season, but fried chicken is presumably safe.

New manager Bobby Valentine told reporters on Saturday that he told the team alcohol would not be permitted in the clubhouse.

"The rules are not to embarrass themselves or the team, the community, their teammates," Valentine said (via WEEI.com). "I don't think that's a new rule. That's a longstanding rule of life. There's no beer in the clubhouse or on the last leg of road trips."

Valentine said he didn't allow alcohol in the clubhouse when he managed the Mets.

Boston's September collapse was symbolized by starting pitchers drinking beer and eating fried chicken in the clubhouse during games.

Red Sox DH David Ortiz said he supported Valentine's new policy.

"We're not here to drink. We're here to play baseball," David Ortiz said (via the Boston Herald). "It ain't no bar."

Valentine noted 19 other teams don't allow alcohol in the clubhouse, including the Mets, Yankees and Cardinals. St. Louis banned alcohol in the clubhouse after the 2007 death of pitcher Josh Hancock.

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Posted on: February 23, 2012 2:19 pm
Edited on: February 23, 2012 4:07 pm
 

Oswalt pulls a Clemens, prepares for half-season



By Matt Snyder


Free agent starting pitcher Roy Oswalt has told major-league teams that he's aiming to join a club at some point during the season.

"After much thought and careful consideration, Roy has decided to continue to evaluate his options," said Oswalt's agent, Bob Garber in a statement. "He is great health and will continue to stay in shape, while throwing regularly off the mound. Roy has every intention of pitching for a contending club at some point this season.''

Spring Training Coverage
You might recall Roger Clemens did the midseason thing twice last decade. In May of 2006, he signed with the Astros and went 7-6 with a 2.30 ERA that season. In May of 2007, Clemens signed with the Yankees, going 6-6 with a 4.18 ERA. He made a postseason start, too, but was chased after just 2 1/3 innings.

Oswalt, 34, wasn't lacking for attention this offseason, as he turned down a one-year, $10 million from the Tigers and also declined to discuss terms with the Red Sox. Oswalt is said to want to be as close as possible to his home in Mississippi, specifically targeting the Cardinals and Rangers -- neither of whom were interested or met Oswalt's asking price. As CBSSports.com's Danny Knobler noted on Twitter, Garber didn't specify which "contending club" Oswalt wished to join, and it's believed he still only wants to pitch for the Rangers or Cardinals. So he's basically waiting on an injury or underperformance to open up a rotation spot on either team.

He was once one of the more durable pitchers in baseball. From 2002-2010, he only failed to make 30 starts one season while throwing at least 208 innings in seven of those nine campaigns. Last season, however, Oswalt was hampered by a back injury and made just 23 starts. He was 9-10 with a 3.69 ERA, 1.34 WHIP and 93 strikeouts in 139 innings. In his one postseason start, he took the loss, allowing six hits and five runs in six innings against the Cardinals.

Oswalt is 159-93 with a 3.21 ERA, 1.19 WHIP and 1,759 strikeouts in his career. He's a three-time All-Star and finished in the top six of Cy Young voting six times, but never better than third. He's pitched in the playoffs four different seasons, two with the Astros and two with the Phillies, once making the World Series (2005 Astros) but never winning it.

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Posted on: February 22, 2012 5:38 pm
 

If no Varitek, there'll be no 'C' in Boston

Jason Varitek

By C. Trent Rosecrans


Jason Varitek has served as the team's captain since 2005, but if he doesn't return -- and it doesn't look like he will -- the Red Sox will go sans an official captain.

"If Varitek doesn't show up? I hadn't planned on [a captain]," new manager Bobby Valentine told reporters (via MLB.com). "If the team thinks a captain's a cool thing, I think that could be considered. It's not that I don't think a captain's necessary. Then again, I don't know that it's so necessary you can't live without it. Who was the captain last year in St. Louis? They didn't have one. So you can win a world championship without a captain."

With Tim Wakefield and (probably) Varitek gone, David Ortiz will be the longest tenured Red Sox, but it doesn't sound like he has any interest in donning the C.

"It's not my job to walk on anyone," Ortiz said Wednesday (via MLB.com). "I'm just an employee, just like anyone else. I'm not a babysitter or anything like that. I'm talking to another man just like me. There's a difference between being a team leader and being a babysitter."

Valentine and Ortiz are probably right, there's no real need for a captain in baseball. The only place it's mentioned in the official rules says an error in a team's lineup should be brought to the attention of the team's manager or captain.

The only two official captains in baseball are the Yankees' Derek Jeter and Paul Konerko of the White Sox, neither of whom wear a "C" patch on their uniform.

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Posted on: February 22, 2012 2:38 pm
 

Report: Edgar Renteria leaning toward retirement

Edgar Renteria

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Former World Series MVP Edgar Renteria is leaning toward retirement, although his agent, Barry Meister told FoxSports.com's Ken Rosenthal that the 35-year-old shortstop probably won't file official retirement papers anytime soon, leaving the door open for a return.

Renteria played for the Reds last season, but Cincinnati instead chose to go with rookie Zach Cozart as its starter at shortstop, along with backup Paul Janish. Renteria received two offers of minor-league contracts from National League teams, but he chose not go that route.

"It had nothing to do with the team," Meister told Rosenthal. "It just had to do with the feeling that this might be the right time."

Renteria won two Gold Gloves and was a five-time All-Star, as well as two World Series titles and another appearance. Although, the highlight of his career came early, when at 20 he hit the game-winning RBI single in the 11th inning of Game 7 of the 1997 World Series with the Marlins. He then won the World Series MVP with the Giants in 2010. He also appeared in the 2004 World Series with the Cardinals.

In an interesting twist, he could be hanging up his glove in the same offseason season that countryman and fellow Gold Glove shortstop Orlando Cabrera retired. Cabrera, 37, played for the Giants and Indians last season -- and coincidentally, was the shortstop for the Reds in 2010. He was also the shortstop for the Red Sox when Boston beat Renteria's Cardinals in the 2004 World Series.

What makes it really interesting is that the two, who are probably the greatest players to ever hail from Columbia, had a rivalry and didn't like each other. Here's a story from 2008 written by Jorge Arangure in ESPN The Magazine that examines and explains the feud. It's a fascinating read, but the crux is this -- Renteria felt Cabrera was jealous of him and then there's a money aspect to the entire deal.

In Cincinnati, I've dealt with both and found it odd. Teammates liked -- and even loved -- both players, they were well-respected and were also good with the media. Renteria, whom I was around less, seemed more quiet, while Cabrera is outgoing, loud and hilarious.

Renteria and his brother founded the Columbian Professional Baseball League and he is seen as a hero in Columbia, while last season Cabrera became a U.S. citizen.

If Renteria retires, he'll end his career with a .286/.343/.398 slash line, 140 home runs and 2,327 hits to go along with five All-Star appearances, two Gold Gloves and two Silver Sluggers. He also played on seven playoff teams with four different franchises. Cabrera finished his career with a .272/.317/.390 slash line, 123 home runs and 2,055 hits. He never made an All-Star team, but did win two Gold Gloves and played on six playoff teams. From 2004-2010, he appeared in the playoffs in all but one of those seven seasons, making six playoff appearances with five different teams.

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Posted on: February 21, 2012 6:20 pm
 

JetBluePark.com redirects to Yankees website

jetBlue Park

By C. Trent Rosecrans


He's not a Yankees fan, but New York fans will have to appreciate Eric Engelman's sense of humor.

The Fort Myers, Fla., resident -- and Cubs fan -- bought the domaine jetbluepark.com for $8 last March after it was announced the new spring training home of the Red Sox would be called jetBlue Park. If you type that URL in, it redirects to the Yankees' homepage (or at least it still did Tuesday night).

"I just thought it would be fun to have," Engleman told David Dorsey of the News-Press.

Engleman spent $8 on the domain, a small price for such a good gag.

When asked about it by Dorsey, a Red Sox vice president said, "We're going to have to look into that."

Engleman will probably end up with some money and a good laugh.

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Category: MLB
 
 
 
 
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