Tag:Alfonso Soriano
Posted on: August 2, 2010 9:00 pm
Edited on: August 2, 2010 9:36 pm
 

Soriano agrees with Guillen

Ozzie Guillen The fallout from Ozzie Guillen's contention that Dominican players are not treated as well as Japanese players continues.

After the White Sox publicly disagreed with Guillen's thoughts, Alfonso Soriano of the Cubs chimed in by agreeing with Guillen that non-English speaking players should have interpreters.

"I think that's good, because we have an example here with [Starlin] Castro," Soriano told Paul Sullivan of ChicagoBreakingSports.com. "We have Ivan DeJesus as a coach, and he's the translator for Castro, so we've got someone so the players can be more comfortable talking with a guy who understands the language."

Soriano did point out, however, that if he was to return to Japan, he would bring his own interpreter with him. It is commonplace for Japanese players to have an interpreter stateside, while Dominican players -- who generally sign young and go through the minors, as opposed to Japanese players -- attend classes.

"That's the difference, because they come here like a man, not a kid," Soriano said of Japanese players. "If you see the way Dominicans or Latins come to the United States, they come like 19-year-olds and they have time to learn. But if you see Japanese players, they already played  in the [Japan League] and they want to feel comfortable and make a lot of money and have guys work for them just because that's what they do in Japan. They don't have time to learn [English]."

Although Castro requires an interpreter, Soriano hopes he will eventually learn English. When closer Carlos Marmol made his major-league debut in 2006, he did not speak English. However, he does now and regularly communicates with reporters and teammates in English.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.
Posted on: August 1, 2010 10:28 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:28 pm
 

Trade market still open


Adam Dunn Everyone refers to the last day of July as the "trade deadline" even if it's not exactly accurate. It's officially the "non-waiver trade deadline" and that first part may not roll off the tongue, but it's important. It's the reason why one of the most speculated-about players at the deadline, Adam Dunn, told me July 31 "doesn't mean [anything]" to him.

Dunn should know, in the last year of a two-year deal, Dunn's movement will be speculated upon throughout the next month. He also knows from experience, two years ago the Reds traded him to Arizona after the non-waiver trade deadline.

Waivers are certainly a complication, but deals still get done until the end of the month, when a player has to be on the roster to be eligible for the postseason. So how does it work?

First, most teams put most -- if not all -- their players through the waiver process since you don't have to give up a player who is claimed, you can just pull him off waivers.

Unclaimed players can be traded to any team. Claimed players can be kept, traded or just handed over to the claiming team for nothing but salary relief. That's what happened last year when the Blue Jays put him on waivers, the White Sox claimed him and Toronto was happy to shed his remaining five years for $59.7 million on his contract. So, if some team wanted to claim Carlos Zambrano or Kosuke Fukudome or Alfonso Soriano, the Cubs would likely dance for joy. But that's unlikely to happen (even though I would have said the same thing a year ago about Rios).

Now, if just one team claims a player, he can be dealt only to that team. If more than one team claims a player, he can be traded to the team with the worst record in his league that claims him. If no team in the same league claims the player, but more than one team in the other league claims him, he can be traded to the team with the worst record.

So now with the process out of the way, it's good to keep in mind that this isn't an unusual process. Last season Scott Kazmir, Jim Thome, Carl Pavano, Alex Gonzalez, Brad Penny, Aubrey Huff, Billy Wagner, Jon Garland and Ivan Rodriguez. So who could that be this year?

Obviously, Dunn is still out there. He realizes the real trade deadline is at the end of this month, not the beginning. If the Nationals can't agree to an extension, the Nationals need to get something for Dunn. Based on many of the rumors that were out there, it was hardly surprising he wasn't dealt. Nationals GM Mike Rizzo was asking for the moon and nobody was willing to spend the money to get there. White Sox GM Kenny Williams hasn't exactly hidden his desire for Dunn, and a little thing like waivers won't stop him. However, he'll have to hope nearly the rest of the teams pass on the big man, and that's not likely.

The biggest name that could move would be Manny Ramirez. The Dodgers don't know what they're going to get out of him and could shed roughly $7 million. As CBSSports.com senior writer Scott Miller notes , Ramirez has a full no-trade clause, but would likely waive that to go to the American League and DH. If the White Sox can't get Dunn, Ramirez may be a solid backup option -- albeit a bit expensive.

Andy LaRoche Diamondbacks first baseman Adam LaRoche has a mutual option for 2011 that increases to $9.5 million if he's traded, though the buyout remains at $1.5 million. Kelly Johnson may not get through waivers, but could still be traded. He's arbitration eligible after the season.

The Royals would certainly love for another team to take Jose Guillen and what's left of the $12 million salary for this season. Guillen is a free agent after the season.

Mike Lowell is still -- sorta -- with the Red Sox, but would likely sail through waivers because he's owed the remainder of his $12 million salary this season and nobody's quite sure what they'll get out of him.

The reliever market didn't see much action on Saturday, but Toronto's Kevin Gregg, Seattle's David Aardsma and Colorado's Joe Beimel could be moved before the end of this month.

As for starters, Colorado's Aaron Cook is signed for $9.25 million next season with a mutual option of $11 million in 2012 and a $0.5 million buyout. His annual salary increases by $1 million for each season.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Posted on: July 9, 2010 10:49 am
 

Cubs selling, but is anyone buying?

Alfonso Soriano Anyone want overpriced, underperforming baseball players?

Well, the Chicago Cubs are having a sale and they hope everything will go.

The Chicago Tribune writes :
Several baseball sources have confirmed to us that the Cubs are ramping up their efforts in the trade market to start clearing the books of cumbersome salaries.

In addition, it is expected that the team's ownership will address the media soon to assess the club's direction, especially if the team continues to struggle before the trading deadline.

"It has been very difficult for the family and the team the first half of the season," Tom Ricketts told season ticket holders Thursday at Wrigley Field. "This is not where the family wanted to be in the first half of the season.
The problem is, who wants what the Cubs are selling?

• A .276/.348/.548 guy with 15 homers and 43 RBI sounds pretty good, except that he's a liability in any defensive position and he's under contract through 2014 at $18 million per year (and a full no-trade clause).

• A middle reliever with more than $30 million left on his contract and a reputation as somewhat of a hothead.

• A broken-down corner infielder due $14.6 million next season hitting .195/.254/.350 with nine homers and 30 RBI.

• How about an extra outfielder due $13.5 million next season who is hitting .259/.357/.429 with eight homers, 26 RBI and has been caught staking as many times as he's stolen a bag (four)?

• A decent starter (7-7, 3.61 ERA 120 strikeouts, 43 walks in 122 innings) who makes $13.5 million next season and has an option for $14 million in 2012.

• A former All-Star first baseman who has only what's left on his $13 million contract for this season, but is hitting .230/.327/.367 with 10 home runs and 36 RBI.

It's not all bad, though. There are guys other teams may want, like Ted Lilly (3-7, 3.76 ERA), who is a free agent after the season, but does have a no-trade clause. He's the most likely to be traded, because people actually want him.

Carlos Silva (9-2, 2.96) is having a great season, but has a checkered past and is owned $11.5 million next season and has a $12 mutual option for 2012.

Closer Carlos Marmol would bring a decent prospect in return, and Sean Marshall would also be worthy to many teams as a set-up man, but both are more valuable for the Cubs on the team than as a trade piece.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Posted on: July 9, 2010 10:49 am
 

Cubs selling, but is anyone buying?

Alfonso Soriano Anyone want overpriced, underperforming baseball players?

Well, the Chicago Cubs are having a sale and they hope everything will go.

The Chicago Tribune writes :
Several baseball sources have confirmed to us that the Cubs are ramping up their efforts in the trade market to start clearing the books of cumbersome salaries.

In addition, it is expected that the team's ownership will address the media soon to assess the club's direction, especially if the team continues to struggle before the trading deadline.

"It has been very difficult for the family and the team the first half of the season," Tom Ricketts told season ticket holders Thursday at Wrigley Field. "This is not where the family wanted to be in the first half of the season.
The problem is, who wants what the Cubs are selling?

• A .276/.348/.548 guy with 15 homers and 43 RBI sounds pretty good, except that he's a liability in any defensive position and he's under contract through 2014 at $18 million per year (and a full no-trade clause).

• A middle reliever with more than $30 million left on his contract and a reputation as somewhat of a hothead.

• A broken-down corner infielder due $14.6 million next season hitting .195/.254/.350 with nine homers and 30 RBI.

• How about an extra outfielder due $13.5 million next season who is hitting .259/.357/.429 with eight homers, 26 RBI and has been caught staking as many times as he's stolen a bag (four)?

• A decent starter (7-7, 3.61 ERA 120 strikeouts, 43 walks in 122 innings) who makes $13.5 million next season and has an option for $14 million in 2012.

• A former All-Star first baseman who has only what's left on his $13 million contract for this season, but is hitting .230/.327/.367 with 10 home runs and 36 RBI.

It's not all bad, though. There are guys other teams may want, like Ted Lilly (3-7, 3.76 ERA), who is a free agent after the season, but does have a no-trade clause. He's the most likely to be traded, because people actually want him.

Carlos Silva (9-2, 2.96) is having a great season, but has a checkered past and is owned $11.5 million next season and has a $12 mutual option for 2012.

Closer Carlos Marmol would bring a decent prospect in return, and Sean Marshall would also be worthy to many teams as a set-up man, but both are more valuable for the Cubs on the team than as a trade piece.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Posted on: June 27, 2010 1:59 pm
Edited on: June 27, 2010 2:04 pm
 

Zambrano Watch: Day 3

Carlos Zambrano Another day, another day full of Carlos Zambrano drama.

The short history for you if you've missed it all: Zambrano stunk against the White Sox, continued his tired baby act in the dugout, was pulled from the game, got in a screaming match with Derrek Lee, got sent to the clubhouse, then sent home, was suspended indefinitely by the team, ruffled feathers by going out to dinner with White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen that night and then manager Lou Piniella said if the Cubs re-instate Zambrano, he'll be headed to the bullpen. And that's as short as I can make the roundup.

So, what's up today? First off, Major League Baseball and the Players Association are expected to meet today about the suspension.

"It's really kind of a day or two away from knowing any more than that," general manager Jim Hendry tells the Chicago Tribune 's Paul Sullivan .

The Cubs would like to replace Zambrano on the roster, but are now playing with 24 men until the Zambrano situation is resolved.

Secondly, Piniella said nobody in team management has talked to Zambrano since Friday's outburst.

Thirdly, the Chicago Sun-Times ' Gordon Wittenmyer has talked to a friend of Zambrano who gives his side of the story.

Here's what Wittenmyer wrote:

And Zambrano already is calling his actions Friday ''completely misunderstood'' and blaming Derrek Lee for turning it into a big deal by confronting him during his ranting and raving after the White Sox' four-run first inning.

''All he wanted to do was pump the team up. It was completely misunderstood,'' a source close to Zambrano said, adding that Lee ''took it personal'' and told Zambrano to ''shut the f--- up.''

Yet team sources say Zambrano's rant -- much of which was in Spanish -- included yelling, ''This team is horse s----!''

That's when Lee is caught on camera intervening and telling Zambrano to shut up.

They had to be separated.

So, about Zambrano's version?

''That's not the way we see it,'' said Alfonso Soriano, who planned to call Zambrano on Saturday night. ''If he explains, maybe we can see it the way his friend sees it. But what he said wasn't right.''

As one Cub put it, ''Anybody who believes [Zambrano's version] must be smoking something.''

Asked if teammates could forgive Zambrano, Soriano said, ''I don't know.'' 

 

Wittenmyer also adds that pitcher Carlos Silva, in his first year with the club, is Zambrano's "only" friend on the club and the rest of the club is hoping Zambrano isn't a Cub much longer.

There's little doubt this story will end in typical Cub fashion -- neither well, nor soon.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.




Posted on: June 13, 2010 9:41 pm
Edited on: June 13, 2010 10:30 pm
 

Dueling no-nos not to be


When does a no-hitter turn into a no-hitter watch? Well, in Chicago, six may be enough. They're through six without a hit. Which team? Either.

Ridiculous. Both the White Sox and Cubs have struggled offensively, but this is ridiculous.

Gavin Floyd has walked two and struck out seven, while Ted Lilly has walked one, hit two and struck out three.

Top 7: Lilly is through the top of the 7th. Lilly has 97 pitches.

Bottom 7: Derrek Lee walks with one out. He's thrown out by A.J. Pierzynski after Lee tries to advance on a ball in the dirt. And then Soriano doubles for the first hit of the game -- for either freakin' team.

Top 8: Gordon Beckham is booed after trying to lay down a bunt with oen out. He misses it. And then he pops up. After Jayson Nix pops out Lilly is through 8.

Top 9: It's raining, but they're gonna try to get this in. Juan Pierre singles up the middle and that's it for the no-hitter and for Lilly. I'm sure it's Dusty Baker's fault.

And in the end, Carlos Marmol tries to find a way to lose it, but gets out of a bases loaded jam and Lilly wins.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.









Posted on: June 11, 2010 3:39 pm
 

No. 300 for Soriano


Cubs outfielder Alfonso Soriano has just hit his 300th career home run, connecting against Jake Peavy of the White Sox in the second inning at Wrigley Field.

Soriano is the second Cub to hit his 300th this week -- Derrek Lee did it Wednesday. They are the 126th and 127th members of the 300 Club.

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Posted on: June 9, 2010 10:14 pm
 

Lee hits 300th career homer


Cubs first baseman Derrek Lee hit the 300th home run of his career in the fifth inning of the Cubs game against the Brewers. Lee's home run was the first of three in the inning for the Cubs, and the third of five for the game at the time.

Lee hit a 2-1 pitch off of Randy Wolf with one out and one on. Marlon Byrd followed Lee's homer with his second of the game. Geovany Soto also has two home runs.

Lee's teammate, Alfonso Soriano, came into the gmae with 299 career home runs.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.



 
 
 
 
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