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Tag:Rex Ryan
Posted on: October 27, 2011 9:09 am
 

Vick hopes Ryan backs up 'all-hype team' remarks

Vick on Ryan's August comments: 'Maybe we'll make him eat his words.' (US PRESSWIRE)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Way back in August, before lackluster effort, injuries and poor coaching combined to inevitably doom some teams' season (even after just seven weeks), Cowboys defensive coordinator Rob Ryan was doing what he does on most days: coaching and flapping his gums.

One particular topic he spoke of early in training camp is of interest this week because it pertained to the Eagles, then everyone's Super Bowl favorite, and in Vince Young's words: a Dream Team. (The saddest part? Young's NFL career will be known more for those two words than anything he ever did on the field.)

Ryan preferred "all-hype team" to Dream Team and it turns out, he was right. The Eagles were 2-4 entering their bye week. He also promised to "beat their ass" when Dallas and Philly played which is this Sunday night.

During a Wednesday conference call, Eagles quarterback Michael Vick was asked about Ryan's comments.

"We know it's a competitive game and sometimes people say things they regret days, weeks and months later. I think from a competitive standpoint, he was just talking. It was nothing that we really paid any attention to because we know what really counts is when you step out on the football field and whoever wins and loses the game, that's what matters."

Vick's right, of course. And Ryan (along with his brother, Rex) is known to talk a lot, and almost no subject is off limits. In the past three months, Rob has weighed in on his brother's freakiness, then mocked him for "ring envy," and made a silly claim that Miles Austin and Dez Bryant were better than Calvin Johnson. But even Ryan was smart enough to stop short of angering Bill Belichick and the Patriots before their matchup two weeks ago.

Vick admitted Wednesday that when Ryan made his "all-hype team" remarks he did something he usually doesn't: took to Twitter where he politely pointed out that "People talk the talk, but can't walk the walk when necessary! We accept all challenges here in the city of Brotherly Love!!!!!"

During a radio appearance Wednesday, Vick sounded a tad more concerned than he did during the conference call. "Maybe we'll make him eat his words. I hope he backs it up. … Players, we're on the field, we're on the gridiron. Coach, you on the sideline coaching. I mean, you don't know what it's like to be in this battle."

Head coach Andy Reid, who has other issues occupying his time, didn't have much to say about Ryan's comments. "I don't get into those," he said. "We just play. We practice and play."

And keep the players from calling out the front office.

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Posted on: October 22, 2011 10:14 pm
Edited on: October 22, 2011 10:17 pm
 

Rob Ryan on Rex's comments: 'It's ring envy'

Posted by Will Brinson



Rex Ryan -- despite his many failed guarantees and unnecessary (but accidental!) potshots at other coaches -- remains interesting to those that follow the NFL. Maybe it's, and I mean this in a totally non-insulting way, the same reason we still enjoy seeing Jack Black in movies.

Or maybe it's something else. Rob Ryan, defensive coordinator of the Cowboys and brother of Rex, doesn't have the answer, per se, but he does have a fantastically quotable potshot back at Rex and his "ring envy."

"I'm glad you asked that question," Rob said when asked about Rex's comments towards Turner. "I've been waiting for that answer. Let me tell you something, that whole comment there is about multiplicity. Rex is constantly using that multiple ring thing, multiple ring this, multiple ring that, multiple ring this. The simple fact is it had nothing to do with Norv Turner. I coached with Norv. Norv is a great coach and a good man. He's done obviously a great job in San Diego.

"The multiplicity thing is really ring envy. It's ring envy. His twin brother has two rings, his dad has three rings, he only has one, so you can see the multiplicity thing. It's embarrassing, because it's all about the family. It's a sibling rivalry and Norv got in the way of a sibling rivalry.''

Kaboom. Roasted.

Of course, what Rob failed to mention is that Norv has multiple rings too, when he was offensive coordinator of the Dallas Cowboys during their run in the early 90's. So maybe it does involve Norv in a way.

There's probably an entirely different argument about whether or not a Super Bowl ring "qualifies" for the debate dependent on what level one coached -- are two rings as the linebackers coach of the New England Patriots worth more than a single ring as the defensive coordinator of a Ravens team that ranks among the all-time greatest defenses?

I don't know. I'm just asking questions. Because I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that's exactly the kind of chatter that happens at the Ryan family dinner table. (And, man, I think I'd pay at least $23.99 for Season 1 of "The Ryan Bros." Right?)

And Rob is probably spot on, because Norv -- an unassuming guy next to anyone in the Ryan family -- somehow did end up caught in the middle of a ring-measuring contest that would have no business being public if it wasn't so entertaining.

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Posted on: October 20, 2011 6:43 pm
Edited on: October 20, 2011 6:44 pm
 

Rex Ryan apologizes to Norv Turner

Turns out, Rex Ryan really didn't mean he'd have two championships if he had the Chargers' gig. (US PRESSWIRE)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Jets head coach Rex Ryan seems unconcerned when his players -- including team captain, Santonio Holmes -- publicly pointed fingers at assistant coaches and each other when the offense sputtered, perhaps because Ryan's shtick is as much about brashness and bravado as what actually takes place on the field for 60 minutes each week.

During his first two years in New York, the Jets twice made it to the AFC Championship Game. This season, Rex's troops are 3-3, partly because the offense looks lost and the defense isn't as formidable as it once was. And while it may have no bearing on how the team performs, the sideshow distractions certainly can't help. The latest: Ryan telling reporters this week that "I think I would have had a couple rings" if he had gotten the Chargers' head coaching gig instead of Norv Turner.

That led the usually reserved Turner to wonder "if [Rex] had those rings with the ones he's guaranteed the last couple of years."  (Norv throws down the mic, walks off the stage to a standing ovation.)

This all happened Wednesday. On Thursday, Ryan apologized.

"It was me, it's all on me," he said. "I'm guilty. Absolutely … Obviously I wish this one never happened. It really was unintentional. I don't know what other word to use. I don't know what to even say."

Yes, because saying out loud "I think I would have a couple of rings" was an accident. It just slipped out.

(And look, we don't care that Rex said it, it's just weird that he's saying it was "unintentional." Backing over your kid's tricycle is an accident. Forming a thought and articulating it into words, for the media no less, is not an accident.)


After a dominant victory over the Dolphins on Monday night, the Jets look to repeat this week as they prepare to take on the San Diego Chargers. NFL.com's Pat Kirwan and Jason Horowitz preview this game. Watch the game Sunday on CBS at 1 PM ET. You can check out the Jets-Chargers Pregame here.

For the record: Norv has two Super Bowl rings -- both came as an assistant with the Cowboys. And Rex has one, when he was a defensive line coach with the Ravens.

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Posted on: October 19, 2011 7:59 pm
 

Norv to Rex: Are your rings with your guarantees?

Turner, RyanPosted by Josh Katzowitz

Normally, if I just had one quote to add to an already completed post, I’d simply slap it on the top of the old post, bold it as an update, and continue on with my day.

But Chargers coach Norv Turner, when he heard about the comments Rex Ryan made Wednesday about how he’d have won a couple Super Bowl rings in San Diego if he’d been hired for the job in 2007, gave such a strong response, it deserved a post of its own.

So, here it is. Mr. Norv Turner, ladies and gentlemen:

"I hadn't seen his quote and I was a little bit surprised by the call. And then after I saw the quote, I didn't have a chance to ask him this, but I was wondering if he had those rings with the ones he's guaranteed the last couple of years."

Yowza for Turner, who I can’t recall ever getting off a zing this good (or a zing at all).

As we’ve seen in the past, Ryan doesn’t have a problem sending out barbs -- even, in this case, if he didn’t exactly mean to leave a mark. Now we get to see how he takes it when another coach is trashing him instead.  

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Posted on: October 19, 2011 4:40 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2011 8:03 pm
 

If Rex coached Bolts he'd 'have a couple rings'

Posted by Will Brinson

UPDATED 8:01 p.m. ET: Norv Turner has decided he's not going to take any guff from the likes of Rex Ryan.

That's why he said this today after hearing about Ryan's statement:

"I hadn't seen his quote and I was a little bit surprised by the call. And then after I saw the quote, I didn't have a chance to ask him this, but I was wondering if he had those rings with the ones he's guaranteed the last couple of years."

Wow.

----------

Rex Ryan's a fiery guy. It also seems like he's the type of fella to hold a grudge; he makes no bones about the fact that he should have (in his mind) gotten the Ravens coaching job.

And in advance of the Jets matchup versus the Chargers -- make sure and check out Andy Benoit's Film Room preview here -- he had some interesting words about San Diego. relating to the job interview he had in 2007 for the San Diego gig.

Namely, Rex feels like if he'd landed the job when he interviewed for it in 2007, he'd have "a couple rings."

"Well, I think I would have had a couple rings," Ryan said on Wednesday, per Kevin Acee of the San Diego Union-Tribune. "I'm telling you, those teams were loaded."

This is interesting because it says, quite obviously, that Rex believes he's a great coach. (In case you didn't know that.) But it also somehow manages to simultaneously insult his own team, the Jets, as well as the Chargers current coach Norv Turner.

Turner took over in 2007 and hasn't won a Super Bowl with the Bolts -- Rex seemed to imply that Norv misused a slew of talent and somehow failed to win a Super Bowl. Knock on Norv all you want for his coaching ability, but it's insane to think Rex is correct in assuming he'd have won "a couple" rings in that time frame.

Which is probably why, about 15 minutes after making the comments, Rex rang up Norv to apologize for the remarks.

The bigger question is whether he's trying to use this statement to motivate his own team -- they beat the Dolphins on Monday but didn't look good doing it, and they could certainly used some improved play if Rex wants a shot at getting started on "a couple rings."

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Posted on: October 19, 2011 10:12 am
 

Film Room: Jets vs. Chargers preview

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit



For the first time in the Norv Turner era, the San Diego Chargers enter their sixth game of the season with a record other than 2-3. Now that the perennial power of the AFC West is finally living up to high expectations out of the gate, no one seems interested in acknowledging them.

That’s about to change. The Chargers’ matchup against the Jets is the only marquee game on an otherwise shabby Week 7 schedule. Below is a breakdown of that game and this very good San Diego team.

(Ed. Note: But first, our film-room edition of the Pick-Six Podcast. Subscribe via iTunes here.)


1. Norv Turner’s offense
Slow starts and a seemingly lax, bland personality have made Turner ripe for criticism over the years. But what no honest critic can deny is Turner has always been ahead of the offensive strategizing curve, particularly recently, as the Chargers have finished in the top five in scoring each year since he arrived.

Turner’s offense is unique. While the rest of the NFL is spreading out, the Chargers operate predominantly out of base personnel (two backs, two receivers and a tight end). Turner believes that you don’t need to align horizontally in order to attack vertically. The Chargers refer frequently to seven-step drops and dictate one-on-one matchups for their gazelle-like receivers by designing routes that go outside the numbers.

This tactic is fairly easy when Antonio Gates is in the lineup, as safeties are compelled to focus on him in the middle. When Gates is sidelined, as he’s been since Week 3, the receivers’ routes are inclined to develop more slowly, which forces the offensive line to elevate its play (blocking on a seven-step drop is not easy). San Diego’s front five has answered that challenge this season.

One-on-one matchups outside can also be commanded simply by lining up in base formations. With a line as powerful on the ground as San Diego’s, defenses are compelled to have a safety eye the running back, if not walk all the way down into the box. Otherwise, the Chargers can run with ease against a seven-man front. A preoccupied safety can’t offer viable help in coverage outside.

Long developing routes not only generate big plays (San Diego frequently finishes near the top of the league in 20-plus-yard passes), they also stretch a defense, which creates space for dumpoff passes to targets coming out of the backfield. Fullback Mike Tolbert (a surprisingly skilled receiver) and running back Ryan Mathews have combined for 48 catches this season, averaging over 10 yards per pop.

2. The personnel and matchups
The Jets don’t mind the Chargers creating one-on-one matchups for their receivers. They’re used to that, in fact, given the way Darrelle Revis shadows the opposing team’s top wideout with no safety help. Expect Revis to blanket Vincent Jackson, and expect Vincent Jackson to see few balls come his way (Revis is coming off a two-interception performance, and the Chargers had no problem going away from Jackson when he was guarded by Champ Bailey two weeks ago).

This leaves Antonio Cromartie-Malcolm Floyd as the key matchup. Cromartie is built to defend downfield routes; he’s a long-striding runner who likes to track the ball in the air, rather than rely on physical jams and proper press technique. If he can handle Floyd one-on-one, the Jets are in business. Most likely, though, he’ll need some help.

With two corners who, for the most part, can match up to San Diego’s receivers, it will be interesting to see how New York defends the running backs underneath. The Jets indiscriminately integrate their linebackers and safeties into blitzes and zone exchanges. Rex Ryan will likely utilize those blitzes and zone exchanges given that even if the Jets can’t sack Philip Rivers, they can at least disrupt and discourage his seven-step drops. Thus, Jim Leonhard, Eric Smith, Bart Scott and David Harris could all take turns blitzing the passer and spying the backs.

3. Philip Rivers
Often, systems are only as good as the quarterback running them. The Chargers have one of the game’s best in Rivers. He is a perfect fit for Turner’s offense. The seven-step drops require a strong arm and the toughness to make throws with defenders bearing down on him.

Rivers has this – all in one package, in fact.

Thanks to his shot-put throwing motion, he does not need much room in order to throw. He can push the ball downfield without having to fully step forward or, obviously, wind up. Mentally, his focus when a hit’s on the horizon is as impressive as anyone’s in the game.

4. The run game
Because Turner’s offense is built largely around manipulating the strong safety, it, more than most, thrives on run-pass balance. That’s why the Chargers traded up last season to draft Ryan Mathews in the first-round. After a disappointing, injury-filled rookie campaign, the first-rounder from Fresno State has started to blossom in recent weeks. Mathews has very fluid lateral agility, which makes him potent in space. The issue has been whether he can create his own space. Last season, he struggled to press the hole and break the line of scrimmage at full speed. That’s a sign of a runner thinking too much.

Mathews has corrected this. He seems to be reading defenses before the snap more than after the snap. As a result, he’s rushed for 98, 81 and 125 yards his last three outings. It helps that he plays with solid lead-blockers in Mike Tolbert and Jacob Hester, a mobile interior line, a capable road-grader like Marcus McNeil and arguably the game’s best left guard, Kris Dielman.

5. Other side of the ball
San Diego’s defense has been every bit as effective as the offense this season. Coordinator Greg Manusky has a very straightforward approach, often basing his tactics on the down and distance. With his corners playing so well and with this being a cohesive veteran unit, Manusky does not have to get cute in his approach.

Aside from the willowy Shaun Phillips, the Chargers don’t have a dominant pass-rusher, though Larry English and Antwan Barnes have both flashed occasionally this season. Still, Manusky is willing to blitz on third down, usually with a traditional inside linebacker who can give the Chargers a fifth pass-rusher to dictate that the speed guys face one-on-one matchups outside. The Jets’ floundering pass attack shouldn’t pose too much of a problem for the Bolts.

What might be a problem is New York’s run game. True, it has been stagnant this season. It’s starting to look like Shonn Greene’s ’09 postseason coming out party will also be the pinnacle of his career. But we’ve seen the Jets succeed before.

Physically, they have the potential to pound the rock, and the Chargers’ run defense stumbled against Willis McGahee and the Broncos two weeks ago. Starting ends Jacques Cesaire and Luis Castillo are both on the mend, and nose tackle Antonio Garay, while a quality player, has not stepped up accordingly. Hard to picture that changing against Nick Mangold.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all Week 7 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: October 18, 2011 9:01 pm
 

Tomlin: NFL shouldn't fine Polamalu for cell use

Will Polamalu face punishment for using cell phone? (AP)
Posted by Ryan Wilson

Other than beating the Jaguars Sunday, the big news for the Steelers was that Pro Bowl safety Troy Polamalu had to leave the game with concussion-like symptoms following a Maurice Jones-Drew tackle. The good news is that Polamalu is fine and should play against the Cardinals this week.

“[Troy] appears to be good to go,” Mike Tomlin said Tuesday at his news conference. “He did a concussion test, and he passed it. He met with our neurosurgeon [Dr. Joseph Maroon], and he’s very comfortable where he is.”

The bad news is that Polamalu may face a fine from the league for … using a cell phone from the Steelers' bench. The NFL prohibits players and coaches from using cell phones on the sidelines during games, presumably because Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez would order takeout (and, obviously, Rex Ryan would have the requisite snack requests -- naughty language alert).

But Polamalu wasn't on the horn for anything untoward -- he was calling his wife, Theodora, to let her know he was okay. Tomlin was asked if he thought the league might fine the Steelers safety anyway.

"He's had a history of concussion-like symptoms and so forth in the past. She was concerned. In this era of player safety, you would think that common sense would prevail in regards to some of those things," Tomlin said. "It wasn't a personal call. He wasn't checking on his bank account. He was talking to his wife to let her know that he was fine, and that was it."

As PFT.com points out, the NFL has a history of meting out heavy fines to players and coaches who break this particular rule. During the 2005 season, then-Falcons head coach Jim Mora was fined $25,000 for using a cell phone during the team's overtime loss to the Bucs.

Then there's the guy probably most responsible for the current no-phone sideline situation: former Saints wideout Joe Horn. Back in 2003, he got the bright idea to hide a cell phone in the goal post padding, which led to this spectacle.

As for Polamalu, we'd like to think that Tomlin's right -- common sense will prevail. But if the league's haphazard policy for punishing players is any guide, Polamalu can expect anything from no fine to a four-game suspension.

Because if NFL commissioner Roger Goodell is anything, he's unpredictable.

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Posted on: October 18, 2011 12:14 am
Edited on: October 18, 2011 5:58 am
 

Dolphins look like they already gave up on 2011

Posted by Will Brinson


The Jets came into Week 6 a very desperate and discombobulated team. The Dolphins, at 0-5, weren't exactly on cruise control but given that Mark Sanchez was 1-3 against Miami prior to Monday night, well, there was a chance to show some life and save Tony Sparano's job.

Rex Ryan's crew tried to give it Miami a win too, but the Dolphins refused to take it, exhibiting a slew of mistakes en route to getting beat down 24-6 in the Meadowlands in primetime.

There are excuses, of course. Teams can't prepare out of bye weeks the same way they used to. Chad Henne is done for the season. And, um, well actually that's about it. Dropped passes, a lack of a pass rush and the inability to convert in the red zone -- all things that plagued Miami on Monday night -- don't count as excuses, because those are problems.

And those problems were scattered all over the place for the Dolphins who put on a miserable performance Monday. Cameron Wake and the rest of the Dolphins front seven barely sniffed Mark Sanchez, who looked extremely shaky to start the game, and never particularly righted the ship on offense.

Credit goes to the Jets offensive line on there -- no doubt motivated by the comments from Santonio Holmes last week ... and the week before that -- because they did a fantastic job of protecting Sanchez. Nick Mangold's return to the lineup, fully healthy, clearly helps them up front.

The Dolphins wide receivers dropped close to double-digit passes that should have been catches. One in particular stands out. Brandon Marshall -- who didn't exactly back up his big talk with a big game despite catching six balls for 109 yards -- streaked towards the end zone, called for the ball with Antonio Cromartie behind him, and didn't jump up for the ball until it was far too late, giving Cromartie a chance at knocking the pass from Matt Moore down.

Moore wasn't that horrible, honestly. 16 of 34 with two picks looks terrible, but, again, the Dolphins dropped a pile of passes and he had to force balls late under heavy duress from the Jets pass rushers. Oh yes, and Marshall -- again, he was going to play like a monster! -- ran out of bounds with nary a single defender in between he and the end zone.

The red zone offense was the worst of all, though. The Dolphins settled for a 23-yard field goal early in the first quarter and got a gift when the Jets bumbled the next kickoff. Instead of points for Miami, though, it resulted in a Darrelle Revis 100-yard pick six and a complete momentum shift.

"That was huge," Rex Ryan said afterwards. "Anytime you can get a red-zone interception and turn it into points that's a huge play."

Another first-half field goal from Dan Carpenter was all the Dolphins would get on Monday and the best possible example of where this team stands might have been their decision to sit on the ball with one timeout and 30-plus seconds on the clock, down 14-6, in the first half.

Not that Miami's got a high-powered offense or anything, but come on. Run a screen to Reggie Bush. Take a shot downfield to Brandon Marshall. There are weapons for the Dolphins and they just didn't seem interested in using them.

Which kind of sums up where Miami is now. They played sloppy and looked like a team that gave up before the game really ever started. Unfortunately for Sparano, we've seen what that usually means for a head coach.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com