Tag:Rex Ryan
Posted on: October 14, 2011 9:29 pm
 

Jets OL Moore on Holmes comments: 'disrespectful'

Posted by Will Brinson

Earlier Friday we pointed out that Jets wide receiver Santonio Holmes blamed the team's offensive woes on the offensive line. Again.

Rex Ryan believed that his offensive linemen, who have "skin like an armadillo," wouldn't be offended by the comments. He was wrong though -- right guard Brandon Moore took umbrage to Holmes statement, calling the comments "disrespectful."

"It’s disrespectful," Moore said, per Mark Cannizzaro of the New York Post. "Guys work hard. To put your teammates out to dry, guys you work with every day so on Sundays you can have productive day, that’s not really being a leader. That’s not being a captain.

"But apparently he’s allowed to say whatever he wants to around here now. Apparently someone around here told him that it’s OK to do that because he keeps doing it."

It seems pretty unlikely that Holmes was, as Moore previously noted, given "the green light to do that from someone up top" whenever he pleases. But the offensive lineman's frustration was apparent, especially since this is the second time he's talked to Holmes about the public comments, to no avail.

"I talked to him after the last time he did it the week after the Baltimore game and he didn’t see anything wrong with it," Moore said. "I don’t know what he thinks about me; I don’t deal with him, and I probably won’t deal with him after this. He’s here, he’s a captain and I’ll worry about the guys in my [offensive linemen] room and me playing to the best of my ability."

So, to recap the last few weeks: there may or may not have been a mutiny amongst Jets wide receivers, Derrick Mason may or may not have been shipped out of town for being part of said mutiny, and the Jets are now 2-3 and in third place in the AFC East.

Winning, as they say, solves a lot of problems. And this isn't the first time that we've seen brash comments coming from a Rex Ryan-coached club. But there's an awful lot of comments from his players pointed inward, and if this were any other team, everyone would be stunned at some of the things being said.

On the bright side, the Jets get the Dolphins on Monday night, and that's a pretty good cure for what ails them. Unless they lose, in which case we could really see things unravel.

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Posted on: October 14, 2011 4:24 pm
 

Holmes points out offensive problems again

HolmesPosted by Josh Katzowitz

With the Jets reeling at 2-3, with an offense that can’t seem to get on track, with a defense that appears to have been overrated, it’s a good thing we can always count on receiver Santonio Holmes to simmer everybody down and keep his team on an even keel.

Oh wait, Holmes has done the exact opposite of that for at least the second time in three weeks. And now he's gotten into trouble with at least one of his teammates.

After calling out quarterback Mark Sanchez following the team’s Week 4 loss to the Ravens -- and then apparently going to Rex Ryan with Plaxico Burress and the recently-departed Derrick Mason to complain about offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer -- Holmes came out firing Thursday on his team’s offensive line.

"I may be criticized again for saying it, but it starts up front," Holmes said, via ESPN New York. "The big guys know it. If they give Mark enough time to sit in the pocket and complete passes, I think everything changes."

He’s right about the offensive line failing to protect Sanchez, especially in that Ravens contest when Baltimore’s defense did whatever it wanted in rushing the quarterback and rattling Sanchez. That led to, as ESPN New York points out, a stripped-down Jets offense that went more conservative in last week’s loss to the Patriots in which Sanchez didn’t attempt a pass longer than 22 yards.

Holmes wasn’t criticizing the gameplan against the Patriots, because it was obvious playing ball-control against Tom Brady gave the Jets the best chance of winning. Still, he wants more passes thrown down the field.

"The numbers speak for themselves," Holmes said. "If you were in my shoes, what would you think?"

Whether he’s right or wrong, Holmes missed the point of an offensive players-only meeting that was called the first time Holmes spoke out against his team. In that meeting, it was agreed that the team would keep all criticisms in-house. That message apparently did not stay in Holmes' mind.

It certainly disappointed right guard Brandon Moore.

"I've never had a teammate do that that I can recall," Moore said, via the Newark Star Ledger. "It's not really being a captain, a leader. It fragments. It’s not productive. ... Obviously, he’s got the green light to do that from somebody up top, the people that run the team or whatever. He’s got the 'C' on his chest, and he can do that."

You’ll notice that Mason, another receiver that could be an outspoken critic, is no longer around. Holmes probably won’t be sanctioned, but at some point, you’d think that Holmes’ constant bad-mouthing eventually will become a problem for him.

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Posted on: October 13, 2011 11:17 am
 

Top Ten with a Twist: Living Legends

Bum Phillips is a living legend (Getty).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

With the death last Saturday of Raiders owner Al Davis, we got to see a side of him that most people under 35 never got to experience. When Davis was an innovator, a kick-ass coach and owner, a fighter against The Man and one of the most important figures in NFL history. It was nice to be reminded of that with tributes all over the Internet, newspapers and in NFL stadiums on Sunday.

Maybe we didn’t think about it in terms like this, but Davis, though largely reclusive to the public, was a living legend, and in the final years of his life, we probably didn’t appreciate him as much as we should have.

That said, here are 10 other living legends who hold (or who should hold)  a special place in the league’s heart. No matter what they’ve become today -- those who are outspoken for and against their old teams, those who spend their time behind the scenes, and those who have disappeared for now -- it’s not too late to show them our appreciation for all the good they’ve done and the lives they’ve led.

10. Ron Wolf: Another of Davis’ protégés, Davis gave Wolf a job as a scout for the Raiders in the early 1960s, and after helping the Raiders to a plethora of wins, he helped set up a 1979 division title in Tampa Bay before moving on to Green Bay as the general manager. He hired Mike Holmgren as the head coach, traded for a backup quarterback named Brett Favre, revitalized that franchise that led to Super Bowl riches and restored the name of a storied organization that had fallen into disrepair.

9. Mike Westhoff: The only man on this list who’s still active in the game, you might remember Westhoff from his turn on Hard Knocks where he played the Jets awesome special teams coach. It wasn’t much of a stretch, because Westhoff has been an awesome special teams coach. Aside from that, he’s a bone cancer survivor (he had to have nearly a dozen surgeries to get rid of it), and he’s one of the most respected working coaches today. But he won’t be around much longer. After 30 years of coaching, he’s said this season will be his last.

Kramer8. Ray Guy: Last year, I made him my No. 1 former player who deserves be in the Hall of Fame, but since he probably won’t ever get to Canton, that list and this one will have to suffice. Once Shane Lechler’s career is over, he’ll be considered the No. 1 punter of all time (maybe he’ll have a chance at the HOF!), but Guy was the one who showed the NFL how important a punter could be to his team.

7. Jerry Kramer (seen at right): He was a better football player than Jim Bouton was a pitcher, but both opened up the world of sports that fans had never seen before. Bouton’s tome, “Ball Four,” is a masterpiece that shocked those who had watched baseball and thought of players like Mickey Mantle as pure of heart. Kramer’s 1968 book, "Instant Replay," was a diary he kept of the 1967 season in which he gave glimpses of what life was like inside the Packers locker room under coach Vince Lombardi while chronicling some of the most famous moments in Green Bay history.

6. James “Shack” Harris: He was the first black player in the NFL to start at quarterback for the entire season in 1969, and in 1975, he led the Los Angeles Rams to an 11-2 record and an NFC West division title. He wasn’t a dominant quarterback in his day, but he was a trailblazer. And after retirement from playing, he was the head of pro player personnel when the Ravens won the Super Bowl in 2001. He’s currently a personnel executive with the Lions.

5. Chuck Noll: We don’t see much of Noll -- who’s rumored to be in declining health -- these days, but his impact is unmistakable. He won four Super Bowls as head coach of the Steelers in the 1970s, and Al Davis thought so much of him that he once tried to sue him (the two were on the same staff in San Diego in the early 1960s). And he was the first coach to allow his team to take baseline concussion tests -- which, as we know today, was a pretty important development.

4. Joe Namath: The legendary Jets quarterback has become a thorn in coach Rex Ryan’s side. Namath is constantly on Twitter, exhorting or back-handing his former team, and because he’s Joe Freakin’ Namath, the media has to pay attention. With that -- and his on-air exchange a few years back with Suzy Kolber -- it’s not difficult to forget just how good Namath was as a signal-caller. He was the first to throw for 4,000 yards (in a 14-game season no less), and he boldly guaranteed victory for the underdog Jets in Super Bowl III and then went out and delivered.

3. Joe Gibbs: One of my colleagues recently called him the greatest coach of the last 40 years, and considering Gibbs won three Super Bowls with three different quarterbacks (Joe Theismann, Doug Williams and Mark Rypien), he’s one of the legends. His return to the Redskins from 2004-07 didn’t go so well (a combined 30-34 record), but before that, his complete career winning percentage was better than all coaches not named John Madden or Vince Lombardi.

2. John Madden: We don’t get to hear much from John Madden these days, and that’s too bad. I liked him on Monday Night Football -- his football knowledge and his enthusiasm -- and though he was before my time, you have to admire his coaching record. He took over the Raiders job in 1969 at the tender age of 33, and when he retired after the 1978 season, he had a coaching record of 103-32-7. That is a winning percentage of .763, and to go with it, he won a Super Bowl and seven division titles in 10 years.

1. Bum Phillips: The old Oilers coach -- and 3-4 defense innovator -- is still kicking around in Texas, attending Texans games, wearing his big cowboy hat and writing books about his life (OK, it’s one book, but you should check it out). He’s a fun guy to speak with, and he’s fully into philanthropy. But aside from his defensive prowess, the dude is a great storyteller. Quickly, one of my favorites: when he was an assistant coach to Sid Gillman, one of the earliest believers in breaking down film, Phillips barely could keep his eyes open one night as Gillman continued studying game tape. Suddenly, out of nowhere, Gillman excitedly claimed that watching film made him feel so awesome that it was better than having sex. Responded Phillips: "Either I don't know how to watch film, Sid, or you don't know how to make love."

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Posted on: October 11, 2011 10:19 pm
Edited on: October 11, 2011 10:22 pm
 

Jets trade Derrick Mason to Texans

MasonPosted by Josh Katzowitz

Derrick Mason was one of the three Jets offensive players who supposedly went to Rex Ryan recently to voice his dissatisfaction with offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer. Though the Jets put out a statement before their game Sunday that said the New York Daily News report was incorrect, Mason only played sparingly vs. the Patriots.

Ryan said Mason’s playing time had nothing to do with the alleged report, but that the two had a private conversation about another matter. Either, Ryan was dissatisfied with Mason about something else, the Jets were trying to trade him away, or maybe both of the above.

Either way, Mason is now gone from New York. As the Houston Chronicle reports, Mason has been traded to the Texans for a conditional draft pick. CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman reports the compensation for the Jets will be a low-round draft pick.

Without him, the Jets lose a receiver who had 13 catches for 115 yards and no touchdowns this season and a 37-year-old who also might have been a locker room distraction.

And now for the second time since last season, Mason is on the move. Which is too bad, considering he said, when he signed with New York, that the Jets gave him a greater chance to get to the Super Bowl. Looks like he might have been wrong on two counts with that prediction.

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Posted on: October 9, 2011 12:44 pm
Edited on: October 9, 2011 12:46 pm
 

Exclusive: Rex Ryan OK with Jets struggles

Posted by Will Brinson

What a production we got here, huh? That's what Rex Ryan says to kick off his interview with CBS Sports Boomer Esiason in the video below that aired on The NFL Today before Week 5. It's a fitting description of the New York Jets, though, too, given the insane number of personalities they have on one team.

However, the Jets have struggled mightily the last two weeks, and there are some concerns about their success this season and locker room issues that are starting to swirl right now. (After the interview, Boomer noted that the Jets "need a win today," especially after the "mutiny" news.)

He and Boomer discuss giving Santonio Holmes a captain's "C," and if there are concerns with "where their locker room is" right now. They also talk about voices outside the team, particularly the criticism that Joe Namath's sent towards Ryan and his crew. Plus, a little discussion of Rex's "Hall of Fame" credentials.

It's classic and/or typical Ryan. AKA awesome.





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Posted on: October 9, 2011 10:37 am
Edited on: October 9, 2011 3:05 pm
 

Mangold in; Jets dealing with WR mutiny on OC

Posted by Will Brinson

UPDATE (2:30 p.m. ET): The Jets issued a statement specifically denying the "mutiny" report mentioned below. This only gets spicier if the Jets can't beat the Patriots Sunday.

"The New York Jets deny a report this morning that wide receivers Plaxico Burress, Santonio Holmes and Derrick Mason have gone to Head Coach Rex Ryan individually in the past few weeks to question offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer’s system," the Jets said in a statement.

-----
Things aren't going the way you'd expect them to for the New York Jets -- two-straight losses, and the team's been unable to move the ball or rush the passer. So, it's probably really exciting for Jets fans that there's a semi-mutiny taking place with offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer.

Reportedly anyway -- Manish Mehta of the New York Daily News cited sources on Sunday that said all three of Santonio Holmes, Derrick Mason and Plaxico Burress "have individually gone to Rex Ryan in the past few weeks to question" Schottenheimer's system.

This is a bit odd, because the Jets have thrown the ball 62 percent of the time to start the season, a rarity for a Rex Ryan-run team. And they're not necessarily in the bottom of any statistical passing categories, ranking somewhere in the middle for passing attempts, passing yards and yards per game.

Whatever, counting stats might not matter here. As Mehta notes, the combines statistics of the three-best wideouts for the Jets (above, natch) add up to 35 catches for 432 yards, which is less than the 40 catches and 616 yards that the Patriots Wes Welker has recorded this season by himself.



Then there's the matter of third-down conversion and success early in drives -- the rushing "attack" is anemic this season, and the Jets are converting just 34.5 percent of their third downs.

"Underwhelming," a source told Mehta.

The Jets will need to be more than just "underwhelming" on offense Sunday if they expect to compete against their arch-rival Patriots.

New England leads the league in total offense (second in points, first in yards per game for what it's worth) and are apparently getting some free chalkboard material from New York cornerback Antonio Cromartie, who foolishly feels the need to taunt reigning MVP Tom Brady.

Good news for the Jets offense, though: Nick Mangold will start this week after missing just two games with a high ankle sprain, according to Albert Breer of the NFL Network.

That's huge for Mark Sanchez and Co., who struggled mightily with Mangold out last week against the Ravens. With Vince Wilfork prepared to wreck havoc on the defensive line, Mangold returning to the lineup is crucial.

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Posted on: October 7, 2011 7:30 pm
Edited on: October 7, 2011 10:45 pm
 

Haloti Ngata fined $15K for hit on Mark Sanchez

Ngata is now $15,000 lighter in the wallet after this hit on Sanchez Sunday night. (Getty Images/US PRESSWIRE)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Ravens defensive tackle Haloti Ngata has been fined $15,000 by the NFL for his hit Sunday night on Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez, several outlets are reporting.

The play in question happened with 8:22 remaining in the second quarter and Baltimore leading New York, 20-7. Sanchez dropped back to pass and as he was about to throw the ball, Ngata blasted him from his blind side, causing a fumble that was scooped up by Ravens linebacker Jarret Johnson and returned for a touchdown.

Referee Mike Carey didn't throw a flag on the play but the NFL, after reviewing the tape, clearly feels differently. The league fined Ngata for roughing the passer. "Specifically, on a pass play, he lowered his head and struck the opposing quarterback,” AFC information manager Corry Rush told PFT.

"I thought Haloti actually hit him in the back with his helmet first, but that being said, he made a great play," Jets head coach Rex Ryan said.

You can judge for yourself below:


Earlier this week Ngata told Dan Patrick that "I love hitting Tom Brady because he always complains. He thinks he should never be touched," When asked if the officials listen to Brady and throw the flag, Ngata said, "No. My hits are usually clean."

Except this time, at least in the eyes of the league.

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Posted on: October 6, 2011 12:29 pm
 

Top Ten with a Twist: Books we want to read

It's time for a biography on Ed Sabol and his son, Steve. (US Preswire).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

With the controversy surrounding the new Walter Payton biography, written by Jeff Pearlman, I got to thinking about the other books we need to read but that haven’t been written yet. I’m not talking about a season in the life book of the 2010 Packers or the latest words written by Mike Ditka (at least five authored or co-authored by the Bears coaching icon), but about subjects we don’t really know and on topics we would love to explore.

For this Top Ten List with a Twist, I’m discounting what a publisher might say if he/she was presented with some of these ideas (namely, the idea that blah, blah, blah won’t sell or that nobody has ever heard of blah, blah, blah). Some of these ideas, no doubt, would work, and maybe, one day, you’ll see one of them on the shelf of your nearest book store in the cart of your Amazon.com page.

Without further ado, here are the Top Ten books we absolutely deserve to read.  

10. The inside story on the NFL lockout: Yeah, maybe many football fans wouldn’t care about a book like this, because they only wanted the work stoppage to end as soon as possible so they could continue to watch the game they love, but I bet it would be fascinating. What is the relationship between Roger Goodell and DeMaurice Smith really like? How were the compromises finally reached? Did Jerry Jones really tap his fists together and walk out of a negotiation session to make a point? For those  who reported and analyzed the entire ordeal, it would be a mind-churning look from behind the curtain.

9. Bill Belichick end-of-career autobiography: Although he almost always comes off completely uninteresting during his midweek and postgame press conferences -- hell, he eats his lunch during teleconference calls with the media! -- the recent NFL Network documentary showed that he’s an interesting dude. The fact he got a little emotional during a trip to the Meadowlands was almost shocking, and I’ve seen interviews with him before that are really, really good. If he let down his guard, like during that documentary, his autobiography would be a fascinating study of the best coach in football. There have been big-name authors who have written big-name books about Belichick, but when his career is over, I want him reflecting on the impact he’s made and the reason he did it all the first place.

8. A biography on Tom Brady’s hair: We’ve already had the obituary for Brady’s shorn locks. Next, we should have a book that tells the tale of the entire two-year history of the hair that helped Brady land that lucrative Uggs endorsement.

7. Sid Gillman biography: Gillman is the most important coach you might not remember. Unlike Paul Brown (who has a stadium named after him and a legacy in Cincinnati) or Vince Lombardi (who you might have heard a little something about) or Woody Hayes (a decent-enough coach at Ohio State) -- all of whom were Gillman contemporaries -- Gillman has fallen through the cracks of history. And considering, he’s the father of the modern passing offense, that’s a shame.

Rex and Rob Ryan (US Presswire)6. Rob/Rex Ryan quote book: This could even be made into one of those peel-a-page-every-day calendars, like the Jeff Foxworthy redneck gags or the best of the old Far Side comic strips. But if you like to laugh (or just shake your head), this book would be a big seller. You could have Rex talking about not wanting to kiss Bill Belichick’s rings or Rob discussing how Calvin Johnson would be the Cowboys No. 3 receiver behind Dez Bryant and Miles Austin. See what I mean? It’d be high hilarity.

5. Bryant McKinnie in the Blind Side, part II: Since McKinnie was the one to replace Michael Oher as the Ravens left tackle, McKinnie should have his own Michael Lewis-penned biography. I’m pretty sure McKinnie didn’t live in foster homes and on the streets before he was adopted, like Oher, but McKinnie has had struggles with his weight and he did (allegedly) spend $100,000 on a bar tab this offseason. It’s not as heartwarming as the Oher book, but a tome about McKinnie would be pretty fun.

4. The early struggles of black players: You know all about Jackie Robinson in major league baseball, but if I asked you who the broke the color barrier in the NFL, you probably wouldn’t have any idea. Hell, I read a long article about the NFL’s integration the other day, and I couldn’t tell you the guy’s name*. But this is an important -- and somewhat complicated -- history. Black players participated in pro football at the turn of the 20th century, and they also were part of teams in various professional leagues until the NFL stopped signing them in the early 1930s. It would be an interesting look at an era that, just like much of society, was decidedly unfair for anybody who wasn’t white.

*After blacks were excluded from the league in 1933, Kenny Washington was the one to break the barrier in 1946, one year before Robinson did it in baseball.

3. A Cam Newton investigation: Don’t we deserve to know who Newton’s bag man is or if there was a bag man at all? Not that it would make any difference in his pro career, but don’t you want to know if Newton’s father really demanded $180,000 from Mississippi State for Newton’s service? Maybe Auburn fans wouldn’t, but I certainly would.

2. NFL Films biography: People underestimate the importance of Ed and Steve Sabol. Proof of that was that it took so long for Ed to earn his way into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. But the NFL -- and the NFL fans -- owe them a huge debt of gratitude, because the way you watch football today might not be possible if NFL Films hadn’t been created on the backs of the Sabol’s in the 1960s. I want to know how it started, the obstacles they faced in the early years and the impact the company has made to this day. It’s a book the Sabol’s deserve to have written.

1. An investigation into the rise of CTE: There have been a few journalists (the Newark Star Ledger’s Jerry Izenberg and the New York Times’ Alan Schwarz are two who come to mind) who do fine work keeping watch on the NFL’s relationship and response to the rise of head injuries that continue to devastate retired players and keep us reminded about what a brutal game football is to those who play it for your enjoyment. But from the premature death of Steelers legend Mike Webster to the shock of what Chris Henry’s brain looked like during his autopsy, from the suicide of Dave Duerson to the continued work of those who track of the rise of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, this is a book that needs to be written. And the sooner, the better.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com