Tag:Arizona Cardinals
Posted on: July 11, 2011 9:45 pm
Edited on: July 11, 2011 10:15 pm
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Warner says his retirement was not '$$$-related'

Posted by Will Brinson

We spent some time earlier Monday talking about the trials and tribulations of former Cardinals quarterback Matt Leinart. Since there's not much going on these days with Arizona's QB situation -- it's a done deal, duh! -- why don't we go deeper in the past and talk about Kurt Warner?

See, over the weekend, ex-Cards scout Dave Razzano tweeted that Warner actually retired because Arizona lowballed him during free agency.

"Warner's people told me he wanted to continue playing but decided to retire after being low-balled," Razzano tweeted.

On Sunday, Warner took umbrage with Razzano's claim and fired back with a tweet of his own (Twit-sics ahoy!).

"2set record straight: I did NOT retire due 2 anything $$$ related! I retired bec I sacrificed enuf 4 the game & didn't want 2 do it anymore!" Warner tweeted.

Warner's maintained for a long time that he left on his own terms -- and, as Mike Sando of ESPN.com points out, that makes a lot of sense, especially because of Warner's quick retirement following the 2009 season.

If Warner wanted to make a pile of money, he could have "Favre'd" the Cardinals and flip-flopped on his decision to retire. But he didn't, and he never really gave Arizona the option of paying him what he was owed because he bounced out of town so quickly.

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Posted on: July 11, 2011 3:44 pm
Edited on: July 15, 2011 9:58 am
 

Leinart on NFL career: I haven't proven anything

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Matt Leinart's NFL career can kindly be described as underwhelming.

Drafted by the Cardinals with the No. 10 pick in 2006, the former USC quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner started 11 games as a rookie but only six games since. Arizona released Leinart before the 2010 season, and he eventually signed with Houston where sat behind Matt Schaub.

Now entering his sixth year in the league, Leinart, 28, is a free agent. We wrote last month that the Seahawks could be interested in his services once the lockout ends and free agency begins (Seahawks coach Pete Carroll was Leinart's coach at USC), but Seattle might also trade for Kevin Kolb, re-sign veteran Matt Hasselbeck or choose to give backup Charlie Whitehurst a crack at the starting gig.

To put it another way: There's a lot uncertainty in Leinart's professional future.

During an appearance Friday on ESPN Radio Los Angeles, Leinart spoke about what it means to have people call him a "bust" at this point in his career.

“I’ve heard everything," he said, according to Sports Radio Interviews. "I’ve seen everything. For me I haven’t proven anything, so I haven’t proven that I could play game in and game out.

"I understand that," he continued. "I believe I can play and I’m not one to make excuses. I’ve never made an excuse with my time in Arizona. It just didn’t work out for whatever reason. Those are reasons people outside of the organization won’t understand, but it didn’t work out and it wasn’t a right fit, so you move on.

"You kind of look at the timeline of what has happened to me and with having a pretty good rookie year and the second year getting the injury and Kurt Warner played himself into the Hall of Fame in the last three years. There’s not a lot I can do about that. I battled with a Hall of Famer two training camps in a row. I thought I competed as well as he did and obviously Kurt was a great player. He took us to a Super Bowl. I truly believe he got himself into the Hall of Fame those last couple of years."

One of the knocks on Leinart after he left Arizona is that he he didn't have the disposition coaches look for in their franchise quarterback. Last September, after the Cardinals released Leinart, ESPN.com's NFC West blogger Mike Sando wrote: "Leinart could have made this work if he had played by Whisenhunt's rules. He wasn't willing (or possibly able) to do that under difficult circumstances. He complained and pouted and made it impossible for Whisenhunt to name Leinart the leader of a locker room filled with players more closely aligned with the Whisenhunt mindset."

In terms of preparing for the 2011 season, Leinart said, "For me I’ve worked hard this off-season. … I’m always ready. I’m always prepared and like I said it’s just always about being a quarterback, but being the right situation. For me hopefully that situation comes up this year and I can thrive and show I belong in the league and I can play because I know I can and that’s what I plan on doing.”

History says Leinart's a long shot. Then again, the guy he sat behind in Arizona was once bagging groceries and playing for the Iowa Barnstormers before he won a Super Bowl ring with the Rams and, in Leinart's estimation, cemented his Hall of Fame credentials with the Cardinals.

Stranger things have happened.

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Posted on: July 9, 2011 8:43 pm
Edited on: July 10, 2011 1:20 am
 

Peterson: 'Those guys aren't telling us anything'

Posted by Will Brinson

BEAVERTON, Ore -- Patrick Peterson, like most rookies, is in the dark when it comes to NFL labor negotiations.

That's part and parcel of being a first-year player -- with the apparent exception of NFL v. Brady plaintiff and Broncos rookie Von Miller -- because rookies don't have a lot of input into big NFL-related decisions.

But, as Peterson told CBSSports.com at the Nike's 7-on-7 challenge "The Opening," it's also because no one has bothered to tell them anything.

"I haven't heard any news about what you just discussed," Peterson said, referring to the recent ruling from the 8th Circuit that affected rookies and free agents. "It's confidential -- those guys aren't telling us anything. The only guy in the rookie class is Von Miller, and I know him personally, and he's not saying anything as well.

"So those guys have to stay true to what's going on in court."

Again, this isn't that odd -- the rookies aren't supposed to be involved in a whole lot when it comes to labor talks. And it's also worth noting that Peterson wasn't contentious about the issue about not being informed on the legal proceeding end of things.

But it's definitely weird that they're not being told anything, especially when serious decisions are being made about their future by people who aren't, well, them.

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Posted on: July 8, 2011 7:01 pm
Edited on: July 8, 2011 7:22 pm
 

PETA sends Dockett a letter about his alligator

Posted by Will Brinson

Darnell Dockett's been a darling of sports bloggers during the last few football-starved weeks.

Not only did he live-tweet getting pulled over by the police, but he recently went out and purchased a baby alligator named "NINO."

This went over spectacularly with those of us desperate for interesting NFL stories. But it didn't go over too well with the wonderful folks at animal-rights group PETA.

And they wrote Dockett a letter.

Naturally.
Dear Mr. Dockett,

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) was alerted this week to media reports indicating that you recently purchased a baby American alligator from the Florida Everglades and that you intend to keep him as a captive pet. Please know that Florida heavily regulates the keeping of alligators and that it's unlawful to keep an alligator as a pet anywhere in the state of Arizona without a special permit. These prohibitive laws and regulations exist because, in addition to posing a threat to public safety, wild animals suffer greatly in captivity.

Alligators in the wild roam freely with members of their own kind, travel long distances, and thrive in the rivers and lakes that they call home. When confined, wild animals will exhibit neurotic and self-destructive behaviors because of extreme boredom, stress, and frustration at being unable to engage in natural behaviors. Keeping an alligator as a pet is simply unfair to the animal. It also poses grave dangers to you and others. By their very nature, these animals are unpredictable and can inflict serious harm. Reptiles are also common carriers of salmonella. You would be held liable for any damage, injuries, or illnesses caused by the alligator.

Respectfully, we ask that you carefully consider this information. Please know that we stand ready to help find a suitable habitat for this animal. May we please hear that you will do the right thing?

Sincerely,

Michelle Cho

PETA
PETA does stuff like this pretty much any time a famous person gets near an animal; they're always looking for free publicity, and they usually pull off publicity stunts that are whacked out enough to warrant writing about. (Like the time they tried to get Phish to change their name to "Sea Kittens" in order to avoid harming actual fish, sigh.)

And they might have a point here, because alligators are wild animals and don't deserve to be all cooped up in a fancy house or be fed really nice food -- Dockett already said no snakes, only "Ruth Chris and Bob Evans pancakes!" -- or cared for by a personal "alligator butler" that Docket will probably hire.

No one deserves that terrible fate.

Gracias to Doug Farrar of Shutdown Corner for forwarding the letter.


Posted on: July 3, 2011 12:44 pm
Edited on: July 3, 2011 9:56 pm
 

For Seattle, is Kolb much better than Whitehurst?

Posted by Ryan Wilson

As the lockout continues, Kevin Kolb's legacy grows. CBSSports.com's Will Brinson wrote Friday that no one's benefitted more from the absence of free agency, minicamps and OTAs than Kolb, who has gone from Eagles backup to the NFL's most sought-after quarterback these last three months.

The Cardinals are most often cited as a potential landing spot, but they're not the only team. Dave Mahler of Seattle's 950 KJR tweeted several days ago that he "heard from a source Seahawks have offered Eagles 1st and 3rd for Kolb." Mahler later qualified his tweet via his Facebook page: "Deal I reported yesterday was made sometime in the last 4 months. I think it says more about where Hasselbeck is on the priority list in Seattle than it does about the chances of Kolb coming. Eagles since offer have also reportedly expressed desire to trade for players instead of picks."

Whenever the alleged offer was made, it's not the first time Kolb and the Seahawks have been mentioned in the same breath. But Pete Carroll is Seattle's head coach, which means that no discussion of roster moves is complete without speculating that the job could go to a former USC player. And that explains last month's Leinart-to-Seahawks rumors.

As is often the case, the truth probably lies somewhere in the middle. Mahler points out the report is as much a commentary on Matt Hasselbeck's future in Seattle as it is on his eventual replacement. Which raises another question: where does Charlie Whitehurst figure in to all this?

Last offseason, the Seahawks and Chargers swapped 2010 second-round picks, and Seattle threw in a 2011 third-rounder to get Whitehurst. They then signed him to a two-year, $8 million deal. That's about the going rate for an NFL backup, but maybe he should get a shot at the starting gig. That's the argument Seahawks blog Field Gulls makes.

"If [Carson] Palmer is unattainable as so many people believe, I think the next best choice is to go with Charlie Whitehurst," Danny Kelly wrote last week. "Here's why: He's already on your roster and thus will cost you no more draft pick capital -- something that will be important for this team in the next year or three. He has been learning the offense all summer, has a strong arm, and is mobile. He's extremely raw and untested so we really don't know what he brings to the table yet."

And that's the thing: No one really knows what Whitehurst can do. He was uneven in two starts last season, but that doesn't means much. Along those lines, do we have any idea what type of starter Kolb will be? Put differently: Are the Seahawks so sure in Kolb's abilities that he's a first- and third-round pick better than Whitehurst?

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Posted on: July 1, 2011 7:38 pm
Edited on: July 2, 2011 5:12 pm
 

Kafka ready, Kolb to bring 'surprise' in return?

Posted by Will Brinson

There's a reasonable argument that no one's benefited more from the lockout than Eagles' quarterback Kevin Kolb.

Sure, he might be the starter for a team right now if the league weren't locked out, but his value's gone through the roof as teams have found themselves in need of capable signal callers and unable to make personnel moves.

In fact, Kolb's been getting so much love that Sports Illustrated's Jim Trotter tweeted today that the Cardinals, where Kolb landing is supposedly a "slam dunk" are offering up a name for the quarterback that "will surprise" people.

Right off the bat, Patrick Peterson pops in my head for this, if only because he was initially considered a strong possibility as a draft-and-trade, and it would be pretty shocking if the Cards ended up handing a No. 5 overall pick for Kolb.
Kevin Kolb: So Hot Right Now

Other names that would qualify as a "surprise" include: Larry Fitzgerald (not happening), Darnell Dockett (the tweets would make it worth it), Alan Faneca (since he's, you know, retired), Beanie Wells (the Eagles don't need a running back and wait, what, he still has value?), and Max Hall (because that would be a bamboozling).

Realistically, Peterson is the only name that can shock at this point, but even that seems like a stretch, right?

But, hey, you never know, and if the Eagles have that deal in place, they have to take it. Especially since Mike Kafka's already got John Beck-like confidence coursing through his veins.

"I definitely think they’re confident I can run their system and run the plays they call," Kafka said recently, per Tim McManus of Philadelphia Sports Daily. "I’m excited for the opportunity to go out and do that."

Alright, that's a stretch, but Marty Mornhinweg's got even better things to say, pointing out to McManus that Kafka might "be the best rookie that I’ve ever had in 15, 16, 17 years."

That's high praise, and a clear-cut indication why the Eagles will be willing to move Kolb for a player that can improve their team in another area.

Fortunately for them, the offseason's given plenty of teams reason to up the ante.

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Posted on: June 28, 2011 7:28 pm
Edited on: June 28, 2011 7:38 pm
 

Ike Taylor to the Cardinals would be a long shot

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Here's a headline that should surprise absolutely no one: "Arizona Cardinals could be interested in Ike Taylor."

A lot has to happen for the Cardinals to land the soon-to-be free agent cornerback who spent the first eight years of his career with the Steelers, but since Ken Whisenhunt became coach in 2007, the Pittsburgh-to-Arizona player pipeline has flowed freely.

Before getting the head coaching gig with the Cards, Whisenhunt was the Steelers offensive coordinator. In the four years since he arrived in Arizona, the Cardinals have signed Joey Porter, Sean Morey, Alan Faneca, Jerame Tuman, Bryant McFadden, Brian St. Pierre, and Dan Kreider -- all former Steelers. And there's Whisenhunt's staff: Russ Grimm (an assistant under Bill Cowher) is the Cardinals assistant head coach, Ray Horton (an assistant under Mike Tomlin) is the new defensive coordinator, and Deshea Townsend (a Steelers cornerback from 1998-2009) is the new defensive backs coach. (We won't even mention the Steelers-Cards ball boy connection.)

Ike Taylor's immediate future is contingent on many things, chief among them: the owners and players settling on a new collective bargaining agreement. Beyond that, it will come down to demand and, of course, money. At various stages of the offseason Taylor has hinted that he wanted to stay in Pittsburgh but that he wasn't interested in giving any hometown discounts to do so.

We suppose there's a chance Taylor lands in Arizona (affectionately known as Pittsburgh West), but a lot will have to happen before it gets to that point. Sports 620 KTAR radio's Ron Wolfley (who also calls Cardinals' games, and whose brother, Craig, is a sideline reporter for the Steelers radio network) breaks out the hypotheticals:

"Let's say they deal [Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie] and bring in Kevin Kolb as their quarterback," Wolfley said, according to ArizonaSports.com. "Does Ike Taylor make sense at the corner opposite of Patrick Peterson? I can tell you it makes perfect sense for so many different reasons. Number one, we're talking about a grizzled veteran. A guy who is a true players pro. He's a professional. A guy that would mentor a young Patrick Peterson. A guy that has been in the league nine years and he's been durable as well. He's missed three games in nine years.

"This is a guy who would be a perfect fit because he already knows Ray Horton's defense. He'd have to be brought up to speed on the terminology but playing corner is not exactly the same as playing quarterback in the National Football League if you get my drift. Ike Taylor could do it. You could bring him in. He'd be the perfect guy in this system."

But Taylor wouldn't come cheap (not to mention DRC for Kolb isn't likely). He'll be one of the most sought-after cornerbacks in free agency after Nnamdi Asomugha. And then there's this: recent history suggests that 31-year-old cornerbacks, even those coming off solid seasons, usually see their productivity drop off a cliff in subsequent seasons.

That's not a guarantee that a similar fate awaits Taylor. (Champ Bailey and Charles Woodson have defied the odds. Of course, Taylor was at no point in his career as good as either Bailey or Woodson, so that's worth keeping in mind, too.) But it's a lot of money to spend on a cornerback with his best days likely behind him. Even if he's expected to mentor rookie Patrick Peterson.

By the way, by most accounts, Peterson is a high-character guy who doesn't seem to need much in the way of mentoring. (And if he does, Townsend would be perfectly suited for that role.) Using that logic, Taylor would make perfect sense in Baltimore. But we're pretty sure that ain't happening.

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Posted on: June 27, 2011 2:09 pm
Edited on: June 27, 2011 2:59 pm
 

Dockett gets pulled by cops, live tweets it all

Posted by Will Brinson

Donovan McNabb recently said that athletes should stay off of Twitter. There's some logic to his thought process (see: the Rashard Mendenhall-9/11 public relations nightmare that recently unfolded) but, ultimately, Twitter is fantastic because it allows athletes to interact with fans.

Or, if you prefer, live-tweet what happens when they're pulled over by the cops and refuse to allow the men in blue to search their vehicle, as the case was with Darnell Dockett (who made our Top 10 must-follow NFL Twitter accounts last year) on Monday afternoon.

"I don't know why the police always messing w/me I'm never gonna let them search my car with out a search warrant!" Dockett exclaimed about 1:00 PM EST on Twitter. "No matter what!"

He then went on a rant while -- apparently -- pulled over on the side of the road, waiting for the cops to return with a search warrant. To the expletive-washed blockquote machine!
Police sitting here waiting on back up cuz I told them YOU NOT SEARCHING MY CAR! PERIOD! & now I'm sitting here! Owell I aint got [expletive] 2 do!"

There R 3police cars and they are talking! I don't see A search warrant they won't see inside this escalade! I got all day hope they don't!

Police said "do you mind if we look around in your Vehicle?" I said I sure DO! He said "I'm gonna call back up" I said u wanna use my phone?

I think they (POLICE) going to get a search warrant cuz they sitting here looking like fools waiting on something!

These COPS really think I'm stupid they playing good cop bad cop! BOY STOOOOP! I'm not falling for that! NO SIR YOU WILL NOT LOOK IN MY CAR!

This cop just ask me how tall R u & where R U from! I'm bout to ask him can I go across the street to POPEYS while we sitting here waiting!

I been sitting here for a HOUR 1cop by the driver window, 2talking at the car! And the 1by the window being friendly! Like wtf?

I asked the cop why he pulled me over he said I was speeding I said [CAPITALIZED BOVINE EXPLETIVE]! But give me the ticket that's when he asked to search my car!

So you gonna lie and say I'm speeding then you wanna search my car! Get the [expletive] ouutta here! Better go get a warrant *turns up radio*

OK so now I think they letting me Go cop just brought my DL's and registration! Yeah I'm bout to be out this MOFO!
So, yeah, this is still playing out in "real time" on the Internet.

And it's probably going to end awesomely one way or another, either with Dockett getting in some kind of trouble and tweeting all the way to jail, or with Dockett posting the officers' badge numbers on Twitter.

Regardless, it's pretty clear that McNabb was wrong about the power of social media.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com