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Tag:Peyton Manning
Posted on: January 24, 2012 10:00 am
 

Peyton Manning has no intentions of retiring

No matter what Chris Traeger might tweet, Manning plans on playing football again. (Getty Images)

By Ryan Wilson

While one Manning prepares for a Super Bowl, another is just trying to get healthy. Eli is headed to Indianapolis for a Giants-Patriots rematch (even if in name only). Peyton, meanwhile, continues to recover from neck surgery that kept him sidelined for the 2011 season, played no small part in the Colts' 2-14 record, owner Jim Irsay's subsequent housecleaning, and the team's plans to take a quarterback with its well-earned first-overall pick.

Thanks to Rob Lowe, fictional Indiana native, Manning was supposedly retiring. This literally is not true.

Manning spoke Monday with the Indianapolis Star's Bob Kravitz about what lies ahead and it most certainly involves playing football.

“I never thought `Sodapop Curtis’ would announce my retirement,’’ Manning said, referring to Lowe’s character in the 1983 movie “The Outsiders.’’ “I always thought I would be the one to announce it. I’m a huge fan of the movie, but that caught me way off guard. I can’t explain it. I know (Lowe) is a friend of Jim’s (Irsay), and Jim sounded surprised.’’

Manning said he finally met with new general manager Ryan Grigson, who hinted that his future in Indianapolis will be determined by the owner.

"One thing he (Grigson) kind-of, sort-of told me, without really wanting to tell me, was that Irsay will be the guy I'm going to sit down and talk with. That's going to happen at some point, but we haven't had that conversation yet because we really don't need to have that conversation yet."

Manning is due a $28 million roster bonus the first week of March and whether the Colts decide to give it to him will largely be determined by his health.

"You know I don't like to say something like, 'There’s no way I can play Sunday,' then come out and play Sunday and everybody in the media is writing 'I can’t believe he’s playing,'" Manning told Kravitz. "I'm not into the drama. And I'm not into saying, 'Well, this is it, I sure have enjoyed it.' I'm not into saying goodbye. All I know is I'm still under contract to the Colts. I'm still the quarterback of the Colts That's why I'm in the building every day trying to get healthy."

Manning also lamented that the upheaval in the front office and on the coaching staff has "Everybody walking around on eggshells. I don't recognize our building right now. There's such complete and total change. … I mean, it's 20 degrees, it's snowing, the building is absolutely empty except when you see coaches cleaning out their offices," he said.

"I guess it's the reality of the football world, just not something I've had to deal with very often. But I'm in there every day, so I have to sit there and see it. Everybody's being evaluated and I'm no different. It's not the best environment."

Whatever happens in coming weeks, this much is certain: if the Colts are ready to move on from Manning, there will be plenty of teams interested in his services.

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Posted on: January 23, 2012 7:05 pm
 

Much has to happen for Manning to land with Cards

Could Whisenhunt and Manning share the same sideline in 2012? (US PRESSWIRE)

By Ryan Wilson

Kevin Kolb was traded to the Cardinals almost six months ago. The team was in desperate need of something resembling a quarterback after Kurt Warner retired following the 2009 season, and Derek Anderson, Max Hall and John Skelton took turns looking completely lost in that capacity in 2010. At the time, we thought that Arizona gave up too much for Kolb. (They sent cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie and a second-round pick to Philly, then signed Kolb to a five-year, $63 million -- $20 million guaranteed -- contract extension.) As the regular-season progressed and Kolb struggled with consistency and injuries, Arizona came to the same conclusion.

Neither coaches nor front-office types came out and admitted it, but they didn't need to. Kolb played in nine games, missed seven more with injuries, and finished the season throwing for 1,955 yards (57.7 completion percentage), 9 touchdowns, 8 interceptions and taking 30 sacks.

By comparison, Skelton, the second-year backup made seven starts, threw for 1,913 yards (54.9 completion percentage), 11 touchdowns, 14 interceptions and took 24 sacks.

Statistically, not much difference between the starter and the guy behind him on the depth chart -- until you compare their salaries. According to Sportrac.com, Kolb counted $4,000,000 against the Cardinals' 2011 cap (it increases to $10 million in '12 and $13 million in '13); Skelton came in slightly less than that at $450,500.

It's understandable that the Cardinals might a) have reservations about Kolb's future and b) consider other options starting, well, now.

Arizona Republic beat reporter Kent Somers wrote Monday about the recent speculation that the Cardinals would have great interest in Peyton Manning should the Colts decide to move forward without him. CBS Sports' Charley Casserly mentioned this two weeks ago.

"One team to watch (should Manning become available)? The Arizona Cardinals," Casserly said at the time. "They can get out of the Kevin Kolb contract and also Ken Whisenhunt's been down this road before. A veteran quarterback coming in at the end of his career? Kurt Warner."

Somers is quite certain the Cards would be interested in Manning because "The entire NFL, minus the obvious few, will go after Peyton if the Colts dump him."

Fair point. Somers then went through the logistical gymnastics that would be required before an Arizona-Manning marriage could take place:
No. 1. Manning has to be healthy enough to play after missing 2011 with a neck problem. That's no small hurdle.

No. 2. The Colts must decide to release Manning. As Darren Urban of azcardinals.com wrote, Manning is due a roster bonus of $28 million on March 8. Kevin Kolb is due a $7 million roster bonus on March 17. For obvious reasons, releasing Manning would not be an easy decision for Colts owner Jim Irsay.

No. 3. If Manning is released, numerous teams will express interest. But how many of those places will be attractive to Manning. This is, I think, where the Cardinals could have an advantage. Throwing to Larry Fitzgerald has to be an attractive prospect. With Beanie Wells and Ryan Williams, the Cardinals have two talented young running backs. There are questions on the offensive line, however. The Cardinals' defense was stout over the last half of the season. Under Whisenhunt, the Cardinals have proven they are willing to throw the ball and to mold their offense around the strengths of an older quarterback.
In general, investing heavily in guys on the downside of great careers isn't the most efficient way to sustain organizational success from one year to the next. But Whisenhunt had Warner fall into his lap and they were one play away from a Lombardi Trophy. If Arizona has the chance to land Manning, they have to dump Kolb and do it, right? Because based on what we saw in 2011, the alternative, in all likelihood, is neither efficient nor successful.

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Posted on: January 22, 2012 11:18 pm
Edited on: January 23, 2012 2:00 pm
 

Sorting the Sunday Pile: Super Bowl storylines

Posted by Will Brinson


Sorting the Sunday Pile takes all of Sunday's NFL action, figures out the winners and losers and asks the big questions. Send your complaints, questions and comments to Will Brinson on Twitter. Listen to the Championship Weekend Podcast Recap below and don't forget to
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Super Bowl Storylines

We have less than two weeks until Super Bowl XLVI is played in Indianapolis, and you need to be prepared for a slew of recurring storylines that will come forth over the next 14 days. Some are good, some are bad. Here are the biggest ones:

1. Playing in Peyton's House
No. 2 on this list will be the most talked about early on, but the biggest story of this Super Bowl is that this matchup takes place in the House of Peyton Manning. Peyton carved out a legacy as a sure-fire Hall of Fame quarterback in Indianapolis, and now the Colts quarterback is sidelined, unsure of his future in Indy, as he watches his most hated rival (Brady) battle his little brother (Eli) for a Super Bowl victory in the Colts stadium.

There's no telling how much face time Peyton will have to put in for the Colts over the next two weeks, and it could very well be minimal, but he's the city's most famous athlete (by a WIDE margin) and it's hard to imagine that he can just go underground while two guys whose lives are so closely parallel to his own prepare to do battle on his field.

2. 2007, All Over Again
Not sure if you heard or not, but the Giants beat the previously undefeated Patriots in the 2007 Super Bowl. It was a pretty good game. A lot of the people who will play in this year's game played in that game. (The Patriots are so bitter about 2007 that they were likely rooting for the Giants against the 49ers, just to get revenge.)

This will be the predominant storyline, whether you like it or not, over the next two weeks.

3. Tom Brady's Legacy
Brady is one of four quarterbacks with three Super Bowl wins. Another one moves him out of a tie with Troy Aikman (three each) and into a tie with Terry Bradshaw and his boyhood hero Joe Montana as quarterbacks with four Super Bowl wins.

There will be a discussion as to whether Brady warrants mentioning as the greatest quarterback of all-time if he wins a fourth Super Bowl. There will be plenty of chatter about how he matches up with Montana. And there will also be a discussion about what a second Super Bowl loss would mean to Brady: he could conceivably move to 3-2 in NFL championship games. That's not "bad" by any stretch of the imagination, but it's also not 4-1.

4. Is Eli Better Than Peyton?
We mentioned Peyton Manning already, but this is one that's going to get a lot of discussion: Manning's clearly established himself as a top-five NFL quarterback this season and he's putting together a ridiculous playoff résumé that is forging his overall legacy as an NFL quarterback.

In terms of raw statistical production, it's not even a contest right now, as Peyton's career numbers crush Eli's career numbers. Really, it's no contest. But Eli's also five years younger and has a shot at picking up his second Super Bowl, something Peyton doesn't have. Siblings can certainly be happy for one another when it comes to their respective success, but it's also going to be rough for both Peyton and Eli to find out how many times "Is Eli better than Peyton?" can be asked in a two-week span.

5. Brady and Eli in the Same Class
And our final quarterback comparison that will go down over the next fortnight: Brady and Eli. They'll go head-to-head for the second time in a Super Bowl over the past five years and this one has special meaning, and not just because Eli beat Brady the last time around. It's also because Eli said prior to the 2011 season that he belonged in the "same class" as Brady.

That's what any competitor should say, but Manning's spent all season long proving that he does belong on the same stage as Brady. A second Super Bowl win -- both over Tom Terrific -- would give Eli the last laugh if anyone asks him the same question before the 2012 season.

6. Bill Belichick's Best Coaching Job?
There's already a good argument that the 2011 Patriots are Bill Belichick's best coaching job in his career. That's a reasonable argument considering the Pats locked down the top seed in the AFC and made it to the Super Bowl despite continually starting Julian Edelman in their secondary.

Leading up to the Super Bowl, lots of people will point out that because of the defensive deficiencies and a number of other issues that a win cements this New England team as Belichick's finest work. They might very well be right.

7. Chad Ochocinco
The always-controversial wideout's been quiet this year and he was inactive for Sunday's AFC Championship Game after leaving the team to attend the funeral of his father. And though Chad fell in line with "The Patriot Way" this year, he's still an erstwhile celebrity, and he'll command some serious media attention over the next two weeks. Will he play? Will he make an impact? Can he play? Should he play? And so on and so forth.

8. Giants Defense
There's several different layers to New York's Big D. First of all, they're using the same formula as 2007, with a relentless pass rush. Secondly, you have to pressure Brady to stop him. Third, they run their mouths at an incredible (and awesome, if you're in the media) pace, and there's a decent chance we get a guarantee from someone (ahem, Jason Pierre-Paul and/or Antrel Rolle).

They'll be the difference-maker in this Super Bowl, because stopping Brady typically means stopping the Patriots, if you can provide enough offense to put some distance between the two.

Winners

Sterling Moore: With the Patriots already starting wideout Julian Edelman, Moore was signed off the street in September after being cut from the Raiders pratice squad. In the biggest moment of his life, he made the biggest plays, knocking the ball out of Lee Evans hands to spoil a Baltimore touchdown and then swatting a ball away from Dennis Pitta on third down to force a game-tying field goal attempt from Baltimore.

Eli Manning:
Manning became the first quarterback in NFL history to win five road playoff games on Sunday night. That's not just impressive, it's amazing: road wins aren't easy to pull off in the regular season but coming from behind and making clutch plays and winning in impossible/unlikely situations is just becoming Manning's modus operandi at this point.

Joe Flacco
: It never seemed realistic that Flacco could "win" if the Ravens lost, but he managed to silence his critics in the loss on Sunday night. There were things he could've done better, for sure, and he missed a pair of deep balls to Torrey Smith that might have given the Ravens a win. But he also put the Ravens in position to -- at worst -- send the game to overtime. Others screwed the pooch, not Flacco.

Giants Defense: Who do you want to give the award to on this side of the ball? Jason Pierre-Paul, Justin Tuck, Osi Umenyiora and Mathias Kiwanuka all registered at least half a sack against Alex Smith and that's precisely the reason why it's believable for the Giants to take down the Patriots in the Super Bowl one more time.

Alex Smith: Yeah, yeah, he lost. But it doesn't matter, because Smith played in horrible conditions against an insane pass rush on the biggest stage, and he played well. Sure, he didn't complete 32 passes like Eli. In fact, he only attempted 26. And only 12 of those were completions. But the dude made some plays with his legs (six rushes, 42 yards), and two of his passes were beautiful shots to Vernon Davis for scores, and Smith kept the 49ers in this game until the end.

Oh, Billy. Billy, Billy, Billy. (Getty Images)

Losers

Billy Cundiff: Can I just type "Ray Finkle" 50 times and call it a day? Cundiff's lack of range -- he was one of six from 50-plus yards in the 2011 regular season -- forced the Ravens hand on offense and then Cundiff shanked a potential game-tying field goal with mere seconds left.

Kyle Williams: It's not Williams fault that Ted Ginn missed a game that featured a ton of rain. But that doesn't mean he can go out there and muff a pair of punts to give the Giants the ball on the 49ers side of the field. Williams set the Giants up for a touchdown in regulation and a game-winning field goal in overtime.

Lee Evans: As noted above, Evans had a ball knocked out from his hands that would've been a touchdown. But it's pretty clear that he got lazy on the play -- hold onto the ball and the Ravens probably play in the Super Bowl. I'm sure his four passes caught in the regular season makes up for it though.

Ed Hochuli's Review Explanations: Four score and seven years ago, Hochuli faced the camera and began explaining why something happened in football. It took him -- literally -- a minute to explain the new playoff overtime rules, and he might've actually used 100 words to explain a false start at one point. Go back to being a gunshow.

Twitter: Aren't you guys rich enough to buy a server that doesn't crash during big NFL games?

GIF O' THE WEEK

Man, Vince Wilfork is steamed.


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Posted on: January 19, 2012 11:00 pm
Edited on: January 19, 2012 11:01 pm
 

Is Matt Flynn a good fit for Redskins? It depends

Add Flynn's name to the list of possible future 'Skins quarterbacks. (US PRESSWIRE)

By Ryan Wilson

We've previously described the weeks and months between the last day of the Redskins season and the start of training camp as their offseason Super Bowl. It's become less a frenzied free-agent free-for-all under head coach Mike Shanahan and general manager Bruce Allen, but much in the same way an alcoholic is one drink away from an impending bender, Washington owner Dan Snyder seems one high-priced acquisition away from another make-believe offseason championship.

The Redskins head into the spring with dire needs at quarterback. This is the logical conclusion to turning the offense over to Rex Grossman and John Beck. The problem: while Washington was sufficiently awful, they weren't quite bad enough to position themselves for Andrew Luck or Robert Griffin III -- not without giving up players or picks first.

Even before the 2011 season ended, we heard rumors that the Redskins could be in the Peyton Manning business should he become available. Two weeks later, there was speculation that, despite their newfound less impulsive approach to roster-building, Washington might trade up to the first-overall pick in April's NFL Draft. And two weeks after that, the "'Skins will try to get Robert Griffin III" rumors were born.

Given the evolution of Redskins-related speculation, it only makes sense that Packers free-agent quarterback Matt Flynn would enter the conversation.

Flynn, drafted as a seventh-round afterthought in 2008, has two career starts, including a Week 17 appearance against the Lions where he went off. By the time it was over, he had completed 70.5 percent of his passes (31 of 44) for 480 yards and six touchdowns. It was enough to make us wonder if Flynn would be this offseason's Kevin Kolb. (To be fair to Flynn, he had accomplished something before being handed $63 million. So he had that going for him.) 

Which brings us back to the Redskins. On Thursday, Chris Russell of ESPN 980 in Washington weighed in on Flynn:
Two things ... factor into the possible Redskins-Flynn equation. Unlike last year, the Redskins will have to make their decisions first on free agency and then the draft. I can't stress how uncomfortable it makes me to bank on the draft to find "THE GUY," and I am NOT a trade up kind of guy. There is no guarantee that RG III is around with the sixth pick, as a matter of fact it is highly unlikely. You may have to move all the way up to the 2nd pick -- which is an extremely high cost.

The last, and this might be most important -- the Green Bay Packers run a very similar style of the West Coast offense as the Redskins do. Every scheme has variances, but these two teams, according to one high end Redskins source -- are "almost the same." Flynn would not face a huge scheme transition like Kevin Kolb did. The source was quick to point this out, saying that Kolb going from Andy Reid and the Eagles to Ken Whisenhunt and the Cardinals (essentially the Steelers offense) was like learning Chinese fluently in a month, when your base language is English.
On Wednesday, CBS Sports NFL Insider Charley Casserly appeared on another Washington station, 106.7 The Fan, to talk about -- you guessed it -- Matt Flynn. Except he wasn't as high on Flynn-to-the-Skins as Russell.

“I think [Flynn] in this system he plays in is really good. So Cleveland, Seattle, if Joe Philbin ends up with a head job in Miami.” Casserly said. “I’m not sure if it’s exactly the same thing the Redskins want in their same system. I’m not sure if everything they’re doing right now is some of the things he’s good at,” he added.

More interesting: Casserly contradicts Russell's claim that the Packers and Redskins run similar schemes. Casserly said the Packers' offense is based on timing while the Redskins rely on deep passes. Given that scouts' generally viewed Flynn as having a weak arm coming out of college (which helps explain why he lasted until the seventh round), he probably wouldn't be a good fit for Washington's down-the-field passing philosophy.

Of course, perceptions change. Next month, quarterback-needy teams could wage a bidding war for Flynn's services, and it's reasonable to think that the 'Skins might be in the middle of it. It's also reasonable to think that they could move up the draft board for either Luck or Griffin. But that's the beauty of Dan Snyder: you never know.

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Posted on: January 18, 2012 4:02 pm
Edited on: January 18, 2012 4:47 pm
 

Rob Lowe tweets that Peyton Manning is retiring

Yeah, this seems about right. (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

Someone is finally reporting that Peyton Manning is retiring. Only it's probably not the NFL "insider" you would expect. Instead, it's Parks and Rec actor Rob Lowe, who reported the news on Twitter Wednesday.

No. Really. This happened.

Colts Offseason

"Hearing my fave, #18 Peyton Manning will not return to #NFL. Wow. #Colts," Lowe tweeted on Wednesday afternoon.

Lowe then tweeted at Rich Eisen, inquiring if the news was accurate and noting that "my people are saying Manning will retire today." (Emphasis mine.)

So, yes, this would be a huge deal. A tremendously huge, ridiculous, insane deal, particularly if Rob Lowe broke the news of Peyton Manning's retirement on Twitter, even though he didn't want to.

"#Colts fans, let's hope my info is wrong," Lowe tweeted. "Don't like being wrong, but this time... I'm hoping #NFL #Manning"

Lowe and his family are Colts fans -- he attended the Super Bowl in Miami when Indy lost to the Saints and he's been known to interact with Colts owner Jim Irsay. Irsay even claims the two are "buddies," so there's that.

Those close to Peyton had a slightly different reaction to the news.

According to Jason LaCanfora of the NFL Network talked to Manning's agent Tom Condon and if Manning was retiring it "was news to him." Chris Mortensen of ESPN contacted Archie Manning, who laughed at the notion.

"Noooo ... he ain't retiring," Archie said. "I think he would've told me."

So it's probably not true. But if it is, then it is LIT-TRA-LEY the craziest NFL story of all time.

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Posted on: January 17, 2012 5:33 pm
Edited on: January 17, 2012 5:51 pm
 

What does the Caldwell firing mean for Manning?

Manning, Irsay

ManningBy Josh Katzowitz

Now that Jim Caldwell has been fired as the Colts head coach, what does that say about what will happen to the face of the franchise for the past 15 years?

Well, it’s probably not great news for those who would love to see Peyton Manning back at the helm of the Colts offense.

As we came to understand this year, Caldwell’s job absolutely depended on Manning playing* – though you have to wonder if Caldwell had gotten more out of his team like, say, a 4-12 season instead of a 2-14 record, maybe Irsay would have kept him – and without that safety net, he was exposed as something less than stellar.

*You know how so many people joked (or maybe they weren’t joking) early this season that Manning should be the league MVP this season because of how different Indianapolis was without him? On that same note, you could make the claim that Manning has done the most damage of anybody in the Colts organization. I mean, look at how many people have been fired because Manning didn’t play this season, including a potential Hall of Fame executive in Bill Polian.**

**Obviously, I’m joking (or maybe I’m not).

But now that Caldwell is gone, along with Bill and Chris Polian, will the Colts decide to bring back Manning for another season and pay his gargantuan salary to do so? Or, will Indianapolis completely begin to reconstruct the franchise without him?

We already know what Manning prefers. His father Archie Manning said Sunday that, “Peyton kind of likes his roots in Indy. … We’ll see what happens there. If that doesn’t work and he can get healthy we’ll see. That’ll all work out. He’s just trying to get healthy.”

While new general manager Ryan Grigson said today that he and the ownership haven’t discussed Manning or who their future quarterback might be -- though that claim seems rather dubious, right? -- here are four reasons why the Colts might decide they’re better off without one of the best NFL quarterbacks in history.

Colts Offseason
Can Manning be what he was?: We obviously have no idea. Manning has no idea. And it's obvious that nobody has any idea whether Manning, following spinal fusion surgery that kept him out the entire 2011 season, will be healthy enough to play in 2012 or whether he’ll be the same MVP-caliber player. Apparently, he’s on target with his recovery goals and he began throwing after practice toward the end of the season, but he’s still a long way from knowing exactly how healthy he can be going forward.

New guys who have no loyalty to Manning: Irsay believes Manning is like family. Bill Polian and Jim Caldwell did, as well. But Grigson won’t feel that way, and most likely, neither will the new coach. Because, well, why should they? And why should they be loyal to Manning? The answer: they shouldn’t, and if Irsay is cleaning house in his organization, he has to know that letting go of Manning might be the next logical move. And if he wasn’t OK with that, he probably shouldn't have fired everybody.

Drafting Luck: Although Irsay claims no decision has been made about whether the Colts will take Andrew Luck with the top pick in next year’s draft, there have been reports that Irsay will do exactly that. And really, how can he not? If the scouts are right and Luck is truly one of the best quarterbacks to emerge from college since Manning, how could Indianapolis not take him? Especially since Manning, at best, has only a few years left in his career, and Luck, if he’s anywhere close to Manning’s talent level, could be running that team for the next 15 years.

Huge money due: Manning originally was due a $28 million bonus on March 8, and though it’s been reported that the Colts want to work out an extension with Manning so they could postpone the decision (considering Manning seems to be amenable with the Colts and wants what’s best for his team, I imagine that will be OK), they can’t push the decision that far down the road.

And that’s really at the crux of the issue. The Colts need to know if Manning can play and play well. Manning can’t give them an answer. With a new direction for the front office, how much are the Colts really going to risk trying to ride Manning to the playoffs for the next few years? The answer: they very well could decide they won’t. And honestly, maybe they shouldn’t.

It's a new world in Indianapolis, and there simply might not be enough room for Manning in it.




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Posted on: January 17, 2012 4:31 pm
Edited on: January 17, 2012 4:40 pm
 

Irsay makes Grigson's first move an easy one

By Will Brinson

Whenever an organization makes a new hire, there's always a discussion of "winning the press conference," which doesn't get you any notches in the win column, but it does garner fan support. Jim Irsay took the concept one step further by letting new Colts general manager Ryan Grigson dispatch unpopular head coach Jim Caldwell.

Frankly, it's a brilliant public relations move. Irsay "cleaned house" earlier in the month when he decided to dump Bill Polian and his son Chris and move the organization in a different direction. Deciding to keep Caldwell was a head-scratcher, almost as perplexing as all the rumors that Caldwell would return in 2012, many of which came as early as Tuesday morning, the day Caldwell was fired.

But by keeping Caldwell until Tuesday and letting him "interview" (for his own job no less!) with Grigson last week, Irsay set his new, young general manager up for a first decision easier to make than a layup on a four-foot goal.


And that decision, on the heels of a 2-14 record for the Colts in 2011, makes Grigson a popular guy around town. If you don't believe me, look at the press conference the Colts held on Tuesday -- Irsay kept his comments short, referenced 1998 and a big rebuild/do-over and turned things over to Grigson, who's now running the show in Indy.

There's nothing odd about that, because Grigson is the GM. That's his job. But he's the guy Colts fans are seeing who's responsible for getting rid of Caldwell and hopefully turning a corner. He's the guy who'll make the decision to draft Andrew Luck, which is also supposed to be a layup.

The Peyton Manning decision is another story, of course. But even if Grigson sends Manning packing and fans get upset at him for the call, they won't get too mad. After all, Grigson's the guy who just made the brilliant decision that Caldwell wasn't fit to run the Colts.

And he can thank Irsay for putting him in the position to make that move.

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Posted on: January 16, 2012 12:15 pm
 

Archie Manning: Peyton 'likes his roots in Indy'

Archie says Peyton 'likes his roots' in Indy. (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

With three games remaining in the 2011 NFL season, it's just about time to flip into full "Where will Peyton Manning play in 2012?" mode. (Trust me: from February 8th to March 8th, you'll hear a lot about it.) His father Archie Manning said Sunday that Peyton would prefer to stay with the Colts.

Of course, as long as Eli Manning is playing -- he beat Green Bay at Lambeau on Sunday with Archie watching -- the Manning machine might as well already be started.

"Peyton kind of likes his roots in Indy,” Archie told the New York Post after watching his other son beat the Packers at Lambeau Field. "We’ll see what happens there. If that doesn’t work and he can get healthy we’ll see. That’ll all work out. He’s just trying to get healthy."

Archie was asked specifically about the rumors that the Jets could be interested in Peyton and declined to discuss that.

“I’m not going to get into that," Archie replied.

It shouldn't be surprising that Peyton wants to stay with the Colts. He's due a lot of money, it's the only team he's ever played for, he's comfortable with the organization and the idea of being discarded by the one team he's ever played for so they can draft a rookie with the first pick can't be comforting.

But Peyton has little control over whether or not he stays with the Colts. That boils down to his health, their specific plan to rebuild the roster and myriad other factors that will be fleshed out over the next month or so.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com