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Tag:Green Bay Packers
Posted on: November 22, 2011 3:01 pm
 

Pick-6 Podcast: Thanksgiving Games Preview

Posted by Will Brinson & Ryan Wilson

It took 15 minutes of football for the Patriots offense to get warmed up Monday night, but once they did they made easy work of the Chiefs, who were forced to start journeyman quarterback Tyler Palko.

What does the win mean for New England? In the short term, it puts a little more distance between them and the rest of the AFC East. Taking the longer view, the Patriots have one more "tough" game -- the Eagles in Week 13 -- then it's smooth sailing until the playoffs.

The Chiefs, meanwhile, are in desperate need of a quarterback. Palko lacks arm strength and accuracy, and it's reasonable to think that Kansas City will invite some veterans in to work out.

We also preview the three Thanksgiving Day games: can the Lions upset the Packers? Do the Dolphins really have a chance to beat the Cowboys? And what are we to make of Harbaugh Bowl I?

We talk about that and more. (Also note: we'll be back Friday for a quick rest-of-Week 12 preview podcast. Enjoy the turkey, everybody.) 

Did we mention that you should subscribe to the podcast via iTunes?

If you can't listen to the podcast below, download it here. And if you'd like to keep working while listening in your browser, pop that puppy out in a new tab here.



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Posted on: November 19, 2011 4:32 pm
Edited on: November 19, 2011 4:32 pm
 

For the gambler in you, Week 11

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Each Saturday, we’ll take the best -- and most clever -- odds collected by bodog.com for the upcoming week and give our take. This is important stuff, perhaps the most important post you’ll read all week. Because if you can’t lose money while watching a game in which you have absolutely no effect, what’s the point of watching sports at all?

Will Andy Reid be the head coach of the Eagles for Game 1 of the 2012 regular season?  
 
Yes EVEN  

No -140     

It’s going to be yes. Even if the Eagles lose out, I don’t see the Philadelphia brass firing Reid just yet. He’s been too good to that franchise to oust him after one terrible year. Besides, the Eagles are going to win a few more games this season and finish with a somewhat respectable record.

How many times will the Eagles be referred to as the "Dream Team" during the live broadcast of Sunday Night Football?
          
Over/Under 2.5

If this were Week 5 and the Eagles were 1-4 and Vince Young was replacing Michael Vick as the starting quarterback, then yeah, I could see the Dream Team thing happening quite a bit. But even though the Dream Team the Eagles are terrible right now, I think the Dream Team is old news. The announcers will say Dream Team less than I did in this answer.

Total passing yards -- Tyler Palko (KC)

Over/Under 235½

As you know, New England’s pass defense is worst in the league. But did you know Kansas City’s pass offense ranks No. 27 with 182.2 yards per game (You would if you were checking out our Matchup Central)? In his entire career, Palko has 82 yards passing. So, I’d go with the under and hope the Patriots prove you right.

Super Bowl XLVI Early Line  
     
AFC +3 (-125)

NFC -3 (+105)

Let’s just assume the Packers will be the NFC representative (that’s a safe assumption, right?). Then, think of the best the AFC has to offer (the Patriots, Steelers, Texans and Ravens). Would any of those teams stay within a field goal of Green Bay at a neutral site? I have a hard time seeing it at this point. Go with the NFC.

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Posted on: November 17, 2011 7:55 pm
Edited on: November 18, 2011 11:46 am
 

The Packers make little girls cry

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Forgive us for snickering just a little at this poor little girl who’s crying because her Vikings got hammered by the Packers (to be fair, though, I’m sure her parents had a gleeful laugh at their own flesh and blood, considering they posted the video to YouTube).

But I feel you should see this video, because if the Packers go undefeated the rest of the way and win the Super Bowl, we now have proof that it’s not only the 1972 Miami Dolphins squad which is going to be crying about Green Bay’s success.

As proven by this video, there probably will be hundreds of young girls throughout this country who are going to be bawling their eyes out with each Packers victory. Which leads us this equation.

Watching Aaron Rodgers destroy your favorite team > Finding out Santa Claus isn’t real.



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Posted on: November 17, 2011 3:37 pm
Edited on: November 18, 2011 5:56 am
 

Johnny Jolly gets 6 years in prison

Posted by Will Brinson

Packers defensive lineman Johnny Jolly -- currently suspended indefinitely by the NFL -- received a six-year prison sentence for violation of his probation on Thursday.

Jolly was charged with possession of codeine in October (in addition to tampering with evidence) -- the third drug arrest for Jolly in three years. His most recent arrest violated the parole that spared Jolly jail time stemming from a charge in April.

The defensive lineman has been featured in numerous media interviews leading up to his verdict, in which he essentially filed an emotional public plea for another chance.

However Jolly, drafted in the sixth round of the 2006 NFL Draft by the Packers, has apparently run out of chances, at least for now. This is his final season under contract with the Packers and given his recent run of arrests, he may find it difficult to secure an early release from prison.

Jolly started 48 games for the Packers, including all 16 in 2008 and 2009, and recorded 77 tackles, two sacks, one interception and 17 pass deflections. He is eligible for parole after 14 months of his current sentence.

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Posted on: November 17, 2011 12:09 pm
 

Driver prefers 'patient' Rodgers to Favre

Posted by Will Brinson



The Aaron Rodgers and Brett Favre debate, for some reason, is gaining steam right now. Perhaps it has to do with all the "undefeated season" and "unprecedented quarterback play" talk about Rodgers right now.

Or perhaps it has to do with Donald Driver's comments on Wednesday night, in which he compared the two quarterbacks.

"I've played with two quarterbacks," Driver said Wednesday on the NFL Network, via USA Today. "One just went out there and did what he did, and he wasn't patient at all. But Aaron takes what the defense gives him, and that's the type of guy you want."

It's worth noting that what Driver said isn't an "Aaron Rodgers is amazing and soooo much better than Brett Favre comment." But it is an astute observation about how the two handle their job -- Rodgers is more patient and less prone to throwing interceptions. (As was Greg Jennings comment that "we didn't go all the way with Brett.")

By the end of this season, should the Packers go undefeated and win a second straight Super Bowl, it may be pointless to debate between Favre and Rodgers anyway.

But maybe not -- Tom Silverstein has an excellent piece in Thursday's Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel where he reminds the world that Favre wasn't exactly a bad quarterback when he played. That sounds silly, but it's worth noting, because oftentimes the greatness of Favre is lost on the world because of the way he left the sport.

It's easy and, really, part of human nature, to have later memories clot out earlier ones. When many folks think of Favre, they think of a helicopter trailing his SUV as he returned from Hattiesburg to play for the Vikings. Or they think of purple. Or Crocs.

They don't think, as Silverstein notes, of the 16-game stretch in 1995 and 1996 (two of his three consecutive MVP years) where he threw a ridiculous 49 touchdowns and just seven interceptions.

Favre was so good, he qualified for the rare "Do not bet against [athlete] on [primetime sports event]" category. Like Michael Jordan any time he stepped on the court, if you bet against Favre on Monday night, you were losing money. It's easy to forget that now, but Favre was amazing.

So maybe it's even more of a reason to throughly enjoy what Rodgers is doing right now.

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Posted on: November 16, 2011 4:09 pm
 

Film Room: Packers vs. Buccaneers preview

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit


The Green Bay Packers are off to the best start of any Defending Champion since the ‘99 Broncos. With legitimate buzz about a perfect season getting louder, let’s look at some of subtle but important elements that make this team great.


1. Aaron Rodgers hidden traits
Through nine games, Rodgers is playing the quarterback position better than anyone has ever played it. No need to sit here and talk about his arm strength, accuracy, intelligence, mobility and “moxie” – all it takes are two eyes and a pulse for an observer to notice these things.

Besides, it’s the little things that set Rodgers apart. Things like….
  • Footwork: This past Monday night, Jon Gruden shrewdly pointed out that when taking a shotgun snap, the right-handed Rodgers keeps his right foot back. All other right-handed quarterbacks keep their left foot back. By keeping his right foot back, Rodgers is in position to throw the second he receives the ball. This is critical given how many quick slants and smoke screens the Packers throw. Rodgers’ footwork is not just unique in the shotgun. He’s incredibly crafty in how he angles his drop-backs ever so slightly to impact opposing pass-rushers’ path to him. It’s something you generally wouldn’t notice unless you have to play against him. Rodgers’ subtle footwork adjustments can be a tremendous help to Green Bay’s offensive line.
  • Presnap vocals: Rodgers recognizes defenses as well as any quarterback in the game and uses the snap count better than anyone. This Sunday, keep track not just of how many times Buccaneer defensive linemen jump offsides (Adrian Clayborn and Albert Haynesworth both had some issues with this last week) but how many times the linebackers and cornerbacks are baited into accidentally showing their hand. Rodgers is remarkable in the way he recognizes any flinch and mentally processes a defender’s initial move. Good dummy cadences allow him to do that.
  • Precision accuracy: Rodgers has the ability to succeed even on plays where the defense’s scheme defeats Green Bay’s offensive concept. His ball command is a big reason why. Most accurate passers simply hit the dart board; Rodgers routinely hits the bull’s-eye. He puts the ball not just on a receiver, but in the most favorable location for that receiver. This is why the Packers are the best in football when it comes to running after the catch. The last passer who threw with the quick release and velocity necessary for near-perfect precision was Kurt Warner. The difference between Rodgers and Warner is Rodgers exhibits this kind of accuracy in the pocket AND outside on the move (he’s the best movement passer in the NFL, Ben Roethlisberger and Josh Freeman included).
2. Formation versatility
The Packers offense is a nightmare to prepare for. They have a bottomless trove of formations and personnel packages. They regularly use three different running backs, five different wide receivers and four different tight ends, with formations reflecting virtually every possible combination of those groupings.

And thanks to the versatility and potency of Jermichael Finley, defenses often can’t decipher whether it will be a run or pass formation until the Packers line up. Even then, it can be hard to decipher, as it’s not uncommon for Finley to shift before the snap. The Packers run a lot of the same plays but out of different formations.

This formation versatility allows Green Bay’s rushing attack to stay afloat. Talent-wise, it’s not a great ground game. James Starks and Ryan Grant are both methodical, gaping-hole runners who can’t redirect quickly or create their own space. It helps that they play with a strong, versatile lead-blocker in John Kuhn and behind stud right guard Josh Sitton and crafty center Scott Wells. H-back Tom Crabtree is also a positive factor in run packages.

But what really makes a difference is that the Packers are a threat to throw out of run formations. They have a viable screen game, they’re great in play-action and Rodgers is not afraid to go downfield even if there’s only one wideout in the formation (the first touchdown to Jordy Nelson in Super Bowl XLV is a great example).

The Bucs safeties struggled in run-pass recognition against the Texans last week. And their linebackers really struggled against the run (middle ‘backer Mason Foster is about as stiff as they come). Don’t be surprised if the Packers pound the Bucs on the ground and later throw the safeties a curveball with a downfield shot out of heavy personnel.

3. Receiver distribution

Receiver distribution can be explained with simple who-where-how questions: WHO are the receivers on the field, HOW do they line up and WHERE do they run? The “who” is always favorable to Green Bay. Greg Jennings, Donald Driver, Jordy Nelson, James Jones and Jermichael Finley form the most formidable quintet in the NFL. All are fast, fundamentally sound and well-schooled in Mike McCarthy’s system.

It’s in the “where” and “how” that McCarthy doesn’t get enough credit. Along with Sean Payton, McCarthy is the best in the business at creating big passes through alignment and route combinations. The Packers create a lot of mismatches simply by lining certain players up in certain areas. They create even more mismatches by designing routes that work off one another.

The best example is their 3 x 1 receiver set (three receivers to one side, one receiver to the other). Greg Jennings is often the X-iso receiver (i.e. the receiver on the one-receiver side). From this formation, an outside route by Jennings all but guarantees one-on-one coverage (a safety over the top can’t cover enough ground quick enough to help outside; even if he could, the three receives being on the other side of the field usually demands that he be over there).

If Jennings runs an inside route, Rodgers has a one-on-one matchup to locate on the three-receiver side. He identifies these matchups almost instantaneously. And with the vast talent at receiver, the one-on-one matchup will almost always favor Green Bay. Defenses that try to nullify this by playing zone to the three-receiver side are punished by route combinations that work off one another by attacking the boundaries of the zones (i.e., that grey area where one defender’s zone ends and another’s begins).

McCarthy’s goal is to slow down a defender’s mental process just enough to give his quarterback time to strike. The second quarter touchdown pass to Jennings in Super Bowl XLV is a great example:


1. The play involved a formation shift, as Greg Jennings’ motion turned a 2 x 2 receiver set into a 3 x 1. This shifted the Steelers’ zone coverage from a Cover 2 to a man-zone scheme, with Ike Taylor playing man against the lone receiver (Andrew Quarless) outside and the rest of the defenders playing zone.

2. In this scenario, the backside safety (the safety furthest from the three receivers) is responsible for the 3 receiver (the receiver nearest the slot). That was Ryan Clark on the right side.

 

3. It was a great route combination by the Packers. The far outside receiver (Donald Driver) ran a hitch, which forced that cornerback to sit on the route. Because that corner had to sit, he could not help against the second receiver (Jordy Nelson), who was running a seam route downfield. Thus, the deep safety, Troy Polamalu, now had to worry about Nelson.


4. The problem was, Polamalu also had the receiver furthest inside (Jennings) screaming at him. Naturally, Polamalu froze for a split second, as he was mentally processing two different receivers racing into the edges of his zone. This created natural confusion with Ryan Clark, who was responsible for that inside receiver and had a lot of ground to cover. Clark had stayed in his original Cover 2 positioning a beat too long (an understandable mistake given Pittsburgh’s fondness for disguising coverage).

5. Rodgers recognized all this. It was exactly how the play was designed to work. The coverage was decent, but Rodgers’ arm was better. Touchdown.

4. The other side of the ball
Green Bay’s defense is as versatile as its offense. It’s a unit that has been inconsistent this season, but don’t think for a second that this group isn’t capable of winning a game on its own in any given week.

Dom Capers’ 3-4 scheme can quickly morph into a 2-4-5 or 1-4-6 scheme, depending on the pass-happiness of the opponent (expect more 3-4 looks this Sunday, as the Bucs utilize a lot of base personnel on early downs). The flexibility of the defensive backs allows the Packers to disguise blitzes before the snap and alter coverages after the snap. These are two of the leading principles of Capers’ system.

Why other teams don’t simply mimic Capers’ effective, playmaking-oriented scheme is because of personnel limitations. Capers enjoys the rare fortune of having the four most critical weapons that a defense in today’s NFL can have: an interior clogger (B.J. Raji), an edge-rusher (Clay Matthews), a cover corner (Tramon Williams) and a versatile slot corner/safety (Charles Woodson). Star players make the role players around them better. The Packers D has stars at every level.

5. The Woodson factor
Matthews might be Green Bay’s most valuable defender simply because there isn’t another pass-rusher on the roster (or perhaps in the league) with his initial quickness and sheer speed. But Woodson has a far greater hand in what the Packers do schematically.

An elite cover corner early in his career, the 35-year-old veteran has morphed into more of a freelancing box safety, ala Troy Polamalu. This isn’t to say Woodson can’t still cover. His five interceptions this season – and outstanding performance playing bump-and-run outside in place of an injured Tramon Williams at Carolina in Week 2 – prove that he can. But he’s more dangerous in the box.

Woodson is an elite blitzer and run defender from the slot. He’s surprisingly physical. His greatest traits are his timing and the unique paths he takes in attack. Woodson recognizes offensive concepts quickly, not just in terms of where the play is going, but when it is designed to get there. He adjusts accordingly, which is why you almost never see him get blocked.

Woodson’s impact is not just felt through his own big plays, either. He is brilliant at getting to spots on the field that he knows will redirect the offense back into the teeth of the defense. A lot of times, the goal of Woodson’s blitz is not to get a sack, but rather, to simply force the quarterback to move into a vulnerable area that the rest of the defense is secretly attacking.

Guys like Woodson only come around every decade or so. They’re rare because it takes about 8-10 years for a player to master the game’s nuances. By that time, most players have declined athletically. The ones that don’t go to Canton.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all Week 11 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: November 15, 2011 4:47 pm
Edited on: November 15, 2011 5:21 pm
 

Eye on Football NFL Awards: Week 10

Posted by Will Brinson



Every week, our NFL experts will hand out the Eye on Football hardware to the best of the best from the NFL week that was.

Week 10 NFL Awards
Expert Offense Defense STeams Coach
Freeman   Fitz  Carter  Hester McCarthy
Judge   Fitz  Carter  Hester   Fox
Prisco  Romo  Carter  Hester  Whiz
Brinson  Romo  Carter Hauschka   Fox
Katzowitz  Romo Wimbley Hauschka   Fox
Wilson  Romo  Carter Hauschka Carroll
Another NFL week's in the books, and that means it's time to hand out the hardware.

Our Eye on Offense Award goes to Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo, whose matchup against Larry Fitzgerald for the trophy was much closer than his beatdown of the Buffalo Bills.

Andre Carter was the near-unanimous selection for our Eye on Defense Award. That's what happens when you produce the best pass rush New England's seen since the Bush administration.

Steven Hauschka -- a fellow Wolfpacker! -- stole Devin Hester's award away from Devin Hester thanks to five field goals that propelled the Seahawks to a (somewhat?) shocking win over the Ravens, and is our Eye on Special Teams recipient.

And John Fox, who continues to befuddle AFC West opponents by properly utilizing Tim Tebow, ran away with our Eye on Coaching Award for Week 10.

Leave your votes in the comments below or scream angrily at us on Twitter @EyeOnNFL.

Eye on Offense Award
Mike Freeman Clark Judge
Larry Fitzgerald Larry Fitzgerald, WR, Cardinals
On a crap team, with a crap quarterback, in a crap game, on a crappy throw, he makes one of the top catches of the week. Then again, week in and week out, that's what Fitzgerald does. He sometimes gets lost amid the talk of the best receivers in the NFL but he was the biggest reason the Cardinals beat Philly and I'd take Fitzgerald over any other WR.
Larry FitzgeraldLarry Fitzgerald, WR, Cardinals
He has 146 yards in catches, two touchdowns and sets up the winning score with a diving reception near the goal line ... and all from John Skelton. The Cards weren't supposed to win on the road. They weren't supposed to win with Skelton. And they certainly weren't supposed to beat the Eagles. They did, and Fitzgerald is why.
Pete Prisco Will Brinson
Tony Romo Tony Romo, QB, Cowboys
Romo completed 23-of-26 passes setting a Cowboys record for completion percentage, and threw three touchdowns in the Cowboys blowout of the Bills. Romo was poised in the pocket all day and never seemed to get unsettled.
Tony RomoTony Romo, QB, Cowboys
Romo had arguably the best game of his career against the Bills, throwing just three incompletions with three teeters, and the only reason his production wasn't better is that Dallas blew Buffalo out. Prediction: we'll be calling Romo a darkhorse MVP candidate by Week 14.
Josh Katzowitz Ryan Wilson
Tony RomoTony Romo, QB, Cowboys
He started the game 11/11 and finished by completing 88.5 percent of his passes (23/26) and throwing for 270 yards and three TDs. Forget about the loss of Miles Austin. With Dez Bryant beginning to show his talent and with the emergence of Laurent Robinson, Romo, at times, shows why he could be a top-five quarterback. That’s what he accomplished in destroying the Bills. 
Tony Romo Tony Romo, QB, Cowboys
According to Football Outsiders, Romo is a top-5 NFL quarterback. You wouldn't know it after watching him against the Jets and the Lions but you certainly would after his performance versus the Bills Sunday. He threw just three incompletions all day (that's three fewer than Tim Tebow ... while attempting 18 more passes) and had three TDs.
Eye on Defense Award
Freeman Judge
Andre CarterAndre Carter, DE, Patriots
The easiest choice to make for these awards. I watched Carter against a moderately talented offenisve line and he destroyed it with 4 1/2 sacks. I didn't think Carter had it in him. I didn't think the New England defense was capable of anything remotely like that. 
Andre Carter Andre Carter, DE, Patriots
The biggest problem with the league's last-ranked defense, people tell me, is that the Patriots can't rush the quarterback. Well, this just in: They just did, with Carter producing a career-high 4 1/2 sacks by himself. Rex Ryan wasn't outcoached. His players were outplayed, with Carter simply too much for the Jets' offensive line.
Prisco Brinson
Andre CarterJared Allen, DE, Vikings
Carter had 4 1/2 sacks against the Jets and could not be blocked. For a team that lacked a pass rusher for much of the season, they may have found one.
Andre CarterAndre Carter, DE, Patriots
The Patriots dynasty was dead (again). Until Andre Carter did to the Jets on offense what Tom Brady did to them on defense, exploding for 4 1/2 sacks and generating the first pass rush we've seen in New England in a while. If he keeps his motor running like this, watch out.
Katzowitz Wilson
Kamerion Wimbley Kamerion Wimbley, OLB, Raiders
On the day when Carson Palmer was celebrated for leading the Raiders to their first win under his stewardship, Oakland’s outside linebacker accumulated four sacks, three additional hits and seven pressures on Rivers. Not bad for a guy who had just two sacks on the season coming before.
Andre Carter Andre Carter, DE, Patriots
The Patriots' defense has alternated between punching bag and laughing stock all season. Against the Jets they were neither, harassing Mark Sanchez into mistakes all evening. Carter had 4.5 sacks, a personal and team best. 

Eye on Special Teams Award
Freeman Judge
Devin HesterDevin Hester, WR/KR, Bears
Thanks to Hester producing yet another return touchdown (this time an 82-yard run to the house), he was the second easiest choice this week. How about this? Stop kicking to him. STOP KICKING TO HIM. And put him in the Hall of Fame.
Devin Hester Devin Hester, WR/KR, Bears
One of these days someone will figure out that no one in NFL history has more punt returns for touchdowns than this guy, so maybe it's not a good idea to kick to him. Hester sets up one score with a 29-yard return, then produces a touchdown on an 82-yard runback. The numbers don't lie, people. This guy is the best there ever was.
Prisco Brinson
Devin HesterDevin Hester, WR/KR, Bears
He had a punt return for a touchdown, his 18th return for a score in his career. Why do people kick to him?

 

Steven HauschkaSteven  Hauschka, K, Seahawks
Doesn't Hauschka kind of look like he should be named "Steve" instead? Whatever, the N.C. State product kicked like his name was Morten on Sunday, banging home five field goals and generating the majority of the scoring for the Seahwaks in an upset only one person saw coming.
Katzowitz Wilson
Steven Hauschka Steven Hauschka, K, Seahawks
In Seattle’s upset of the Ravens, Hauschka matched the franchise record by kicking five field goals (22, 38, 39, 35 and 30 yards). They weren’t long attempts, and they weren’t game-winners. But without his capability, Seattle doesn’t provide the week’s most surprising result.
Steven Hauschka Steven Hauschka, K, Seahawks
The former Raven was an integral part of the Seahawks' "death by 1,000 field goals" gameplan. He was 5 for 5 and accounted for all but seven of Seattle's points in their win over Baltimore, the league's most inconsistent team.
Eye on Coaching Award
Freeman Judge
Mike McCarthyMike McCarthy, HC, Packers
Monday night against Minnesota was the perfect time for a letdown game and the Packers respond by wrecking the Vikings. I know. Division rival. But it isn't easy playing those type of games when their lead in the division is so large and the opponent is no good.

John Fox John Fox, HC, Broncos
Not only did he beat Kansas City in Kansas City, he won by completing two passes all afternoon. Of course, it always helps when you run for 244 yards, but Fox's Broncos did it with their top two backs missing most of the afternoon. Fox is smart to tailor is offense to his quarterback's talents, and that tinkering has the Broncos a game out of first in the AFC West.
Prisco Brinson
Ken WhisenhuntKen Whisenhunt, HC, Cardinals
Playing with backup quarterback John Skelton on the road against a supposed good team in the Eagles, Whisenhunt got his team to pull off an upset as a 14-point underdog. That's impressive.
John FoxJohn Fox, HC, Broncos
Fox is a run-first/play-defense type of guy, so you have to think he rather enjoyed beating the Chiefs when his offense only completed two passes all day. Mock the read-option at your own risk: what Fox and his staff are doing with Tim Tebow is the very definition of great coaching.
Katzowitz Wilson
John Fox John Fox, HC, Broncos
You can call the offense he’s helped install a college-style offense. You can call it outrageous to current NFL sensibilities. But you also have to call it a winning formula so far. Fox isn’t known for his offensive capabilities – he came up on the defensive side of the ball – but with offensive coordinator Mike McCoy, this read-option style of play has Denver at 3-1 when Tim Tebow starts at quarterback.
Pete Carroll Pete Carroll, HC, Seahawks
Jim Harbaugh deserves some credit too, because Carroll hoped the Ravens would get away from Ray Rice and the run game and that's exactly what happened. It's not every day you're out-schemed by Carroll. We can only hope that during this post-game handshake Caroll reminded John to say hello to his brother Jim for him.

Posted on: November 14, 2011 11:48 pm
 

Packers D joins offense in Monday night rout

Posted by Will Brinson



Not breaking news: Aaron Rodgers is pretty awesome. Also not breaking: the Green Bay Packers are really good. They showed as much on Monday night by breaking out the whupping stick against the Vikings and beating Minnesota 45-7 at Lambeau to improve to 9-0 on the season.

Rodgers was nearly perfect (again) Monday, completing 23 of 30 passes for 250 yards and four touchdowns. The raw accumulation of his stats doesn't really tell the story, though, because Rodgers was out of the game with 10 minutes left, and backup Matt Flynn actually was perfect, going 2/2 for 38 yards a touchdown.

Week 10 Wrapup

The Packers defense is the bigger story though, because they were markedly improved from previous weeks -- defensive coordinator Dom Capers got aggressive after Christian Ponder, as Clay Matthews nearly matched his season total with a pair of sacks on the Vikings rookie quarterback.

Green Bay didn't allow a single point from Minnesota in the first half and Capers unit also limited Adrian Peterson to just 51 yards on 14 carries, although in fairness to Peterson's game, there wasn't really ever a chance for Minnesota to get their offense going, after Randall Cobb took a punt return 80 yards for a touchdown following Minnesota's three-and-out to start the game.

The only points the Packers did allow were a touchdown from Peterson that occurred only after Cobb muffed a punt in the third quarter, giving Minnesota the ball on Green Bay's 14-yard line.

Obviously the Vikings aren't the NFL's most elite offense, but as we've seen with other would-be teams around the league, it's possible to trip up against lesser opponents.

The Packers didn't flinch once, and judging by their decision to keep running passing plays out of the shotgun, inside Minnesota's red zone, while up 30-plus points, their only concern is winning every single game the rest of the season.

If the defense progresses like it did on Sunday over the next few games, that's a distinct possibility, because there's no reason to think the offense is going to slow down at any point.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com