Tag:Mark Sanchez
Posted on: September 14, 2010 3:10 pm
Edited on: September 14, 2010 3:45 pm
  •  
 

Week 2 Top Ten with a Twist: biggest letdowns

The NYJ provided us with the biggest letdown of the week (Getty).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz


We all heard the hype before the first week of games was complete. We heard the boasts and the proclamations and the Super Bowl aspirations in the offseason and in training camp. Yet, this past weekend, we found out that some who had so much confidence perhaps shouldn’t have been so forthright about their thoughts.

Sure, some of us – many of us – bought into so much of the hype. And now we know better. Without further ado, here’s the top-ten list with a twist entering the second week of games.

Top 10 Biggest Letdowns After So Much Offseason Buildup

10. Kevin Kolb: It’s not really fair to completely dismiss the Eagles starting QB after he played just one bad half of football (that, unfortunately for him, came with a side of concussion). But after so much discussion about how Philadelphia made the right move by trading Donovan McNabb to the Redskins – who naturally won with McNabb on Sunday night – and giving the job to Kolb, this move fell flat with his 5-for-10, 24-yard performance. Now, there’s another quarterback controversy in Philadelphia.

9. Percy Harvin and Bernard Berrian: I was on the bandwagon with the Vikings receiving corps, even after Sidney Rice underwent hip surgery that’s supposed to keep him out half the season. I had called Minnesota’s receivers one of the best units in the league. I might have been wrong about that – or, at the very least, underestimated the impact of Rice’s absence. Harvin and Berrian combined for two catches for 15 yards Thursday. That’s two freakin’ catches for 15 freakin’ yards.

8. Jake Delhomme:
Many of us figured Delhomme was nearing the end of his career – he was going to CLEVELAND after all – but he certainly had to be considered an upgrade over the awful Derek Anderson/Brady Quinn combination from last year. And besides, he couldn’t possibly be as bad as his last year in Carolina (eight touchdowns, 18 interceptions), right? Well, he might just be that bad. For a veteran QB, he made a terrible throw that was picked near the end of the first half that killed any momentum the Browns had when they led 14-3. Delhomme still is an upgrade from last year, but man oh man, he needs to play smarter.

Stafford 7. Matthew Stafford: Is it possible the 6-foot-3, 230-pound quarterback is brittle? Last year, he suffered a shoulder injury, though he showed huge guts by returning against the Browns to throw a game-winning TD pass (if you’ve got 6:27 to kill, check out Stafford’s killer Mic’d Up segment from that game – it’s cool as hell). On Sunday, he apparently suffered a Grade 2 separation of his right (throwing) shoulder that could keep him out 4-6 weeks. Considering how poor backup Shaun Hill played, some of that preseason Lions optimism has leaked away.

6. 49ers:
They were supposed to win what should be a very weak NFC West. And then they get blown out by a Seahawks team that shouldn’t have played as well as it did. But you know, coach Mike Singletary said Monday he was excited about QB Alex Smith, so that has to be comforting/horrifying to San Francisco’s fans. Perhaps the 49ers are vastly overrated. Or perhaps Seattle RB Leon Washington was inspired by our Five Questions (Or More) segment we did last week.

5. Terrell Owens:
Was he upset, already acting like a diva? Were his shoes bothering him? Was he getting himself checked out by a team doctor? These are the theories that have been bandied about since Owens, along with teammate Chad Ochocinco, left the field before the Bengals attempted a Hail Mary pass at the end of the first half. Any which way, Owens didn’t endear himself to Cincinnati fans after a smooth preseason. He had seven catches for 53 yards, but he certainly wasn’t the dominant force he and Ochocinco predicted he could be. Lucky Cincinnati got him cheap.

4. Bob Sanders: Sanders had been annoyed this preseason about all the questions he’s faced about his durability, and he was excited to be fully healthy for the start of the season. But he's torn a biceps tendon and could be out for the season. Again, his durability will take a huge hit, and once again, the Colts will have to find a way to win without him – something they couldn’t do against the Texans.

3. Concussions in Philly: remember all the talk about how the NFL was really serious – no, no, really, really SERIOUS – about concussions and keeping players from returning to the field too soon after a brain injury? Yeah, neither does the person(s) who somehow thought it was OK for Eagles LB Stewart Bradley and QB Kevin Kolb to return to the game after suffering concussions. Coach Andy Reid explained it like this: “They were fine. All of the questions that they answered with the doctors registered well, but as it went on, they weren’t feeling well, so we took them out.” Yep, Bradley really looked fine after stumbling around the field like Trevor Berbick after facing Mike Tyson. That’s a scary, disturbing scene.



2. Tim Tebow: Two measly carries for two measly yards. That was Tebow’s stat line from Denver’s loss to Jacksonville on Sunday. Of course, he is a backup QB playing his first NFL game, so we shouldn’t expect the moon from Tebow (I could echo those sentiments for the rest of the season, in fact). But for the amount of hype we got, doubly so because Tebow was opening his career in his hometown, it wasn’t much of a payoff. Unless you like your hype short-lived and ineffective.

1. Jets: I knew that if I kept talking about the possibility of the Jets winning the Super Bowl, they’d make me look like an idiot. And so they have. Still, there’s little doubt that with a defense like that, New York could (should?) make a run in the playoffs (though losing NT Kris Jenkins for the season with an ACL tear could complicate those plans). The problem, of course, is the offense. QB Mark Sanchez went 10 for 21 for 74 yards, and starting RB Shonn Greene had five carries for 18 yards (plus a tough time holding onto the ball). With an offense that plays that poorly, the Jets have no chance for the Super Bowl. And maybe not even the playoffs. 

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .

Posted on: September 13, 2010 10:41 pm
Edited on: September 13, 2010 11:45 pm
 

Shonn Greene likely punished for fumbles

Posted by Will Brinson

No one on the Jets' offense has had a great game Monday night -- six first downs and a single first-down conversion in a sloppy loss to the Ravens tend to lend themselves to poor statistical performance.

Shonn Greene might be having the worst night of anyone though. The feature back (and early round fantasy pick) carried the ball five times for 18 yards and fumbled twice, one which he recovered.

Following the second fumble with just under five minutes remaining the first half, Greene disappeared from the field for nearly two quarters, likely as a result as his inability to hold onto the ball.

Unfortunately for him, his first play back was a swing pass from Mark Sanchez that he promptly dropped, leading to a third down that featured Sanchez getting rocked for a sack and eventually testing out his knee on the sideline.

And, as near confirmation of the coaching staff's unhappiness with Greene, it was LaDainian Tomlinson in the backfield for the team's final (and failed) drive.

We won't be able to actually confirm that Greene was being punished until Rex Ryan's postgame press conference (which may or may not feature an expletive if the Ravens hold on), but it seems safe to say that he won't be having the most fun week in practice.

On the bright side, Tomlinson (11 carries, 62 yards; 1 catch, 7 yards) looks like he could fill in if Greene decides he's not ready for big-boy work just quite yet.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .
Posted on: September 12, 2010 9:12 am
 

What could you see on Hard Knocks?

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Before Ravens offensive coordinator Cam Cameron claimed to have learned something about the Jets schemes from the wonderful HBO series “Hard Knocks,” I wondered exactly what some clever coach could glean from the footage.

HBO showed some of New York's play-calling, and some of the formations that went with it. The coaches shared their private thoughts about some of the players in those remote camera office scenes. You could hear the cadences and audibles of QB Mark Sanchez in the middle of game action.

I couldn’t decipher anything from it, but I wondered if a coach who actually does this for a living could.

"What are you going to learn?" Ryan asked in today’s New York Daily News. "You guys saw it. What did you get out of it?"

Me? I didn’t get anything out of it. A fellow coach? Maybe something that could help his team gain a small advantage.

From the story:

Cameron originally told Baltimore reporters, "There was probably a lot revealed in that strategically, the way I viewed it . . . There was a lot of stuff in there strategically."

Cameron would not go so far as to say how useful the information would be. "I'm not going to say that yet," Cameron said.


Perhaps there is something minor that somebody could learn, but keep this in mind: the Jets had the final say on what’s shown on Hard Knocks and what’s not shown. If the organization really felt like it was giving something away, you can bet that it would never have allowed HBO to put it on for the whole world to see.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .

Posted on: September 9, 2010 2:58 pm
 

Hard Knocks episode 5 review

Posted by Andy Benoit

Our final review of Hard Knocks is somewhat abbreviated because, let’s face it, with the regular season kicking off tonight, the excitement over a training camp/preseason show – even a show as tremendous as this – calms down considerably. This in mind, HBO and NFL Films should consider starting and ending the show a week earlier next year.

The late ending shouldn’t take away from the fact that the fifth and final episode was absolutely phenomenal – particularly in the last 10 minutes. We got an inside look at some of the Darrelle Revis contract negotiations. Granted, it wasn’t quite the full inside look (cameras showed Rex Ryan and Woody Johnson planning their trip to go so see Revis in Florida, but they didn’t follow them past the airport), but it was a much deeper inside look than anyone would have guessed.

The best scene was when a group of Jets staff members, including Ryan, GM Mike Tannenbaum and public relations director Bruce Speight, were sitting around a speaker phone negotiating with Revis’ agent. Frustrated when Revis’ agent reiterated the same point for what we’ll assume was the umpteenth time, Ryan stood up and said, “You know what, I’ve been going at this thing for the last several days. I’m gonna go coach this team, get them ready for Baltimore. So I’m done. You know the way the owner feels. I can’t believe we can’t get a damn deal done. It’s a f****** joke.” As he stormed out of the Sanchez and Ryan (US Presswire) room, Ryan shouted back to the phone, “Three years left on a f****** contract! Watch Monday night! See what the f*** happens!”

Tannenbaum ended the call and eventually broke the ensuing heavy silence by saying, “What’s the negotiation playbook say to do now?”

Of course, minutes later (minutes later in the show, that is), Revis showed up at practice and made his Hard Knocks debut. The series ended with the star cornerback breaking down the team’s huddle.

A few other things that stood out from Episode 5:

--Fullback Jason Davis is dripping with arrogance. He’s a good player, but he wasn’t good enough to make the final roster.

--Special teams coach Paul Westhoff got his wish: David Clowney was let go. Tannenbaum told Clowney he never won Westhoff over.

--Mark Sanchez got to call plays during the second half of the final preseason game. Sanchez was elated when the Jets reached the end zone on the first series (he even taunted offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer).

--There isn’t a person in the world who isn’t rooting for running back Chauncey Washington to make it in the NFL. He’s not there yet, but the entire Jets organization respects everything about him.

--The ultimate underdog, Danny Woodhead, a diminutive undrafted free agent, made the team, thanks in part to Santonio Holmes’ suspension.

If HBO and NFL Films are planning Hard Knocks 2011 (if there is football in 2011), here’s an official vote for another year with Ryan’s Jets.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow  @cbssportsnfl   on Twitter   and subscribe to our  RSS Feed .

Posted on: September 8, 2010 11:22 am
 

Cromartie: Jets 'are the Miami Heat of football'

Posted by Will Brinson

If you weren't expecting the Jets to be less obnoxious the night of the "Hard Knocks" finale or slightly humbled as the season gets closer, well, you were wrong. You were also stupid -- as soon as they got Darrelle Revis back, it was obvious they were only going to get cockier.

But Antonio Cromartie has taken it to a new level, unless I'm somehow badly misconstruing the quote he dropped on Manish Mehta of the New York Daily News .

"We're the Miami Heat of football," cornerback Cromartie said.

Cro wasn't the only one smack-talking, either. (Note that we'll examine his statement below.)

"Some people may think if we took a step closer and just got there, that'd be enough," tight end Dustin Keller said. "But it's not at all. This team is basically Super Bowl or bust."

That's not TOO insane. Everyone should be "Super Bowl or bust" before the year in the NFL.

Mark Sanchez' decision to say "We're building a dream team," could be considered a little cooky though.

Okay, so you've heard the other crazy talk, but re: Cro and the Heat, is it a) ridiculous, b) incorrect, c) foolish or d) all of the above?

I'll go with "d" and here's why: for the Jets to be the "Miami Heat of football," they would need a top-three player in the NFL at three-fifths of the 22 positions on the field. Darrelle Revis gives them that at one position. Bart Scott perhaps. Santonio Holmes is a hell of a slot receiver, no question about it. Nick Mangold is an excellent center. Etc, etc.

 Look, I get that they're 1) chock full of big names, 2) riddled with tons of veterans chasing a ring, 3) one of the few favorites to win the championship even though people are really skeptical and 4) universally hated, but all of those things don't combine to overcome the fact that in comparison to the Heat, the Jets lack a significant amount of elite talent to really make a valid comparison.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .
Posted on: September 6, 2010 1:55 am
Edited on: September 6, 2010 2:02 am
 

Now, the Jets truly are Super Bowl contenders

D. Revis, shown here intercepting a pass vs. Oakland, ended a 36-day holdout and should be ready for the season-opener against Baltimore on Sept. 13 (Getty). Posted by Josh Katzowitz

The signing of Darrelle Revis changes the entire dynamic of the Jets season.

Now that I’ve read that sentence again, I realize that’s a pretty bold statement, because it’s hard to imagine one defensive player affecting his team in that way. But in the case of Revis, it’s true.

With Brett Favre, it’s true. With Peyton Manning, of course it’s true. Tom Brady, Adrian Peterson, Andre Johnson, etc., it’s true.

Revis is the only defensive player in the league who can compare.

Without Revis – the No. 1 defender in the NFL – the Jets were good. Potentially very good. Sure, Mark Sanchez would have to improve on his rookie season. RB Shonn Greene would have to prove right the front office – which allowed Thomas Jones (331 carries, 1,402 yards and 14 TDs last season) to walk – and 31-year-old LaDainian Tomlinson would have to keep rediscovering his 27-year-old speed and arsenal of moves.

WR Braylon Edwards would have to keep making those impressive catches, and two of the best offensive linemen in the NFL – LT D’Brickashaw Ferguson and C Nick Mangold – would have to keep opening holes while keeping Sanchez off his backside.

In fact, after watching the Jets first-team offense blast the Giants first-team defense in the preseason opener, I wrote I thought Rex Ryan’s squad could compete for the Super Bowl.

A quick passage from that blog post:

Ugh, I hate myself for writing something like that based on one measly preseason game in which the team I’m touting lost by 15 points. But the first-team offense, for the most part, looked very good – except when the Jets got to the red zone – and the defense, like last year, looked pretty nasty. They looked like a team that still could be playing in February.

If ….

If, that is, they get back Darrelle Revis. Because without Revis, New York might not be the Super Bowl team coach Rex Ryan thinks they can be. A virtual unknown WR named Victor Cruz made that pretty clear tonight during the Giants 31-16 win against the Jets.


Now, the Jets have their “If” back. And with their “If” in the mix, this team becomes one of the best in the league.

The Jets front seven remains unchanged. Which, when you’re talking about NT Kris Jenkins and Vernon Gholston (who has had a strong preseason) and LB Bart Scott and LB David Harris (sadly, the only one of the Core Four who won’t receive a new contract) is a good thing.

Without Revis, though, the secondary looked awfully thin. Antonio Cromartie is solid No. 2, but Cromartie is no Revis when he's being counted on to be the shutdown CB. Kyle Wilson, a first-round pick out of Boise State who now has lost his starting job, was inexperienced, and the rest of the secondary was the kind of secondary who would allow Victor Cruz, an undrafted rookie free agent playing in his first NFL action, to have a breakout game and catch three touchdown passes.

Now, the question becomes: what kind of shape will Revis be in when he flies to New York on Monday to sign his new contract and begin practice in preparation for the Sept. 13 season-opener against the Ravens?

According to Manish Mehta of the NY Daily News, Revis spent part of his 36-day holdout in South Florida working out with former CB Ty Law. He should be in pretty good shape.

That said, the Jets knew they couldn’t go into the season without their best player. You could see the tension in the face of GM Mark Tannenbaum as this weekly saga played out on HBO’s Hard Knocks. Ryan, even though he was kidding when he went door to door in the season’s first episode looking for Revis and begging him to return to the team, knew he needed Revis in his defense. Ryan was being funny in that scene, but that doesn’t mean he wasn’t telling the truth.

That’s why Ryan, in a move straight out of Vikings coach Brad Childress’ playbook, flew to South Florida this weekend to saw howdy to Revis and to add a spark to the contract talks.

Even until the end, Tannenbaum – who said he explored trading for other CBs – wasn’t sure the deal would get done.

"I really wasn't optimistic,” he told reporters in an early Monday morning conference call. “Until it was done, I really didn't think he'd be here."

Yet, here he is. The “If” has returned. The best defensive player in the league – the only one who could have this kind of impact on his squad, one way or the other – is back. And the Super Bowl trophy awaits.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .

Posted on: September 4, 2010 11:20 am
 

Podcast: Chatting with Mark Sanchez

Posted by Will Brinson

Mark Sanchez and the Jets may look cool on "Hard Knocks," but just like anybody else, they love video games. In fact, so much so that when the peeps at XBox found out about their video game habit, they sent them a sneak preview of "Halo:Reach" to test out as a team.

So, when we got a chance to chat with Sanchez recently, we asked him about the team's gaming skills ... in addition to Rex Ryan's ability as a coach, the expectations facing the 2010 Jets, the tough part about being a high profile second-year quartberack, the team's favorite moments from "Hard Knocks," what he thinks about the Darrelle Revis situation, and much, much more.

So, go ahead. Click the play button. Got a question you want answered on the show? Hit us up on Twitter (@CBSSportsNFL) or email will.brinson [at] cbsinteractive[dot] com

Oh, and also, be a friend and subscribe either by RSS or iTunes below.

If you can't view the podcast, click here to download .
Or, make it easy on yourself and  Subscribe via iTunes .


For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow  @cbssportsnfl   on Twitter   and subscribe to our  RSS Feed .

Posted on: September 2, 2010 2:10 am
 

Hard Knocks review: Episode 4

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

After a one-week absence, I’m back with my review of the fourth episode of what has been a very good season of Hard Knocks.

 -The episode begins on a down note. Apparently, nobody has any leadership with this team. It’s a concern for the coaches. This, not surprisingly, will be a theme.

- What a nightmare for Tim Cowlishaw. The Jets front office is talking about his reporting that Darrelle Revis and the Jets would sign a deal. GM Mark Tannenbaum has no idea what anybody is talking about. As a reporter, this is an interesting perspective. Unfortunately for Cowlishaw, we know how this ends.

- It’s hilarious that Mark Sanchez walks into the quarterbacks meeting without a binder to talk about the gameplan for the Redskins games. That’s a rookie mistake for a guy who’s not a rookie any more. Hell, even the guy who’s going to get cut at the end of the show has his binder ready to go. Unless he was set up, and of course, it’s a veteran move by Sanchez to get back at his offensive coordinator by changing his screensaver into something not exactly manly.

- Kellen Clemens’ meeting with Tannenbaum is interesting. Tannenbaum says he wants to cut Clemens’ salary to the minimum but he would guarantee that throughout the year. Also, by the way, Mark Brunell is the No. 2 QB, Tannenbaum says. Responds Clemens, “Here’s a question for you. What if I say I’d rather not?” Tannenbaum without missing a beat: “We’d probably cut you. … Probably sooner than later.”

Ouch.

- Ah, I could tell some stories about Laveranues Coles. Unfortunately, none of them would be all that interesting because he HATED dealing with the media in Cincinnati. As in, he never did it. Interesting to hear how the coaches seem to like to him, especially because Santonio Holmes is suspended for the first four games of the season. But then again, the team just cut Coles. So, that’s kind of weird.

- Wow, FB John Conner just lifted a Panthers special teamer off the ground with a block on kickoff return. As Rex Ryan said, “He knocked the piss out of the guy.” I think if he had the opportunity, Ryan might like to make out with the Terminator.
 
- Jason Taylor seems to have a problem getting to the stadium on time. Not just in the New Meadowlands, but at Hofstra too. The first time, it was a big joke. It wasn’t so funny the second time.

- And what’s up with eating cheeseburgers on the field before practice? The coaching staff is running a real disciplined workout, eh?

- Man, the players just LOVE it when a jackass runs onto the field during practice and the security details rocks the crap out of him. It’s funny, though. Whenever you see somebody disrupt a sporting event, there are always a few level of emotions you feel. No. 1, Hey that’s kind of funny. That guy is just running around out there, isn’t he? No. 2, All right, this guy is kind of getting annoying. When will the game restart? No. 3., He’s not taking off his clothes, is he? No. 4, I wish somebody would hit this guy and get him out of here.”

With the Jets, they fast-forwarded to No. 4 real quickly.

- Uh-oh, so it turns out Rex didn’t like the whole cheeseburger thing at practice. I love after his impassioned speech about being a professional and being a leader, he ends it with, “Now, let’s go eat a g------ snack!”

- Boy, Vladimir Ducasse didn’t look so good in the Redskins game, huh?

- Ugh, it’s brutal to watch these guys’ faces when they realize they’re going to be cut. But that’s cold how Ryan talked to Coles when he was cutting the 32-year-old WR. “We have to have money in place in case (Revis) shows up without a new contract. There’s a great possibility you’ll still be on this football team. But if we have you in the first week, we have to pay the whole season. The way our money is right now, we can’t do that.” Coles takes it well, and I know he’ll be OK. We’ve had chats about finances before, and I know he’s smart with the way he handles his business.

-And that’s the way the show ends. Not my favorite episode of the series, but solid nonetheless. We’ll see what happens in the final cuts next week.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com