Tag:Carson Palmer
Posted on: October 10, 2010 8:38 pm
Edited on: October 10, 2010 9:10 pm
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Numerology Week 5: Parity Party

Posted by Will Brinson

The jury is still out on science, but the verdict on math is F-U-N, so we present the week in NFL from a numbers perspective.

0 - Undefeated teams remaining in the NFL. If an expanded schedule is coming, this might have been the last decent shot at running the table, and no one even wanted to give an effort at making Mercury Morris cry.

2 - Blocked punts by the Raiders in the first quarter as the Chargers, resulting in a touchdown and safety against the continually awful special teams unit of San Diego.  

4 - Straight games in which the Bills have allowed 30-plus points, which is the first time that has happened in their franchise's history. That is not good news.

5 - Field goals by Josh Scobee, tying a Jaguars franchise record.

7 - Losses that the NFC West has taken while traveling.  

13  - Number of times the Raiders had lost to the Chargers in a row until Sunday, when they snapped the longest losing streak to another team with a shocking 35-27 upset.

29 - Yard missed field goal by John Carney, which should do wonders for the "kicker controversy" chatter.

44 - Games since the Detroit Lions last won by more than 30 points -- they beat Denver 44-7 on November 4, 2007 and then St. Louis 44-6 on Sunday.  

90 - Number of seconds  in which Carson Palmer managed to throw quarter interceptions while doing his "best Jake Delhomme impression" and helping the Bengals hand the Buccaneers a win.  

140 - Characters in which Darrelle Revis announced that he'll be playing on Monday before the team could tell anyone. Well, technically it was 110, but either way: OchoCinco News Network strikes again!

147 - Total passing yardage that FOUR quarterbacks (Jimmy Clausen, Matt Moore, Caleb Hanie and Todd Collins) combined for in the miserable-to-watch Bears-Panthers tilt. They also managed to throw SEVEN interceptions.

290 - Total passing yardage from Philip Rivers against the Raiders … in the first half.

314 - Yardage for Kyle Orton, which keeps him on pace to break Dan Marino's record. It's worth noting that he picked up about 65 or so of those in junk time though, and that the only number that really matters here is the "1" win the Ravens picked up.

1970 - The last season no one in the NFL made it to 4-0. Parity reigns supreme.

Posted on: October 9, 2010 10:06 am
Edited on: October 9, 2010 10:06 am
 

Marvin Lewis' future is unknown

Marvin Lewis is in the final year of his five-year contract, and his future is unknown at this point (Getty). Posted by Josh Katzowitz

It seems likely that most of the Bengals would want to keep playing for coach Marvin Lewis. So, when QB Carson Palmer tells Yahoo! Sports, “He’s done so much to change the atmosphere around here, and we really value him as a coach. I’m not really thinking about Marvin’s contract situation – I’m pretty much just focused on football – but it would be great if they got something done,” that’s what you’d expect him or any of his teammates to say.

Say what you will about Lewis, but his players, for the most part, like him very much.

Lewis is in the final year of his five-year contract with the team. He’s been with the Bengals since 2003, and entering Sunday’s game, he’s led them to a 58-57 record and two AFC North division titles.

But, according to Michael Silver of Y! Sports, Lewis and owner Mike Brown have not engaged in any serious contract extension talks.

You might wonder why, but if you think about it, this scenario is not that outlandish for a couple different reasons.

1) Lewis might not want to stay. The Bengals organization, while sometimes it makes horrendous personnel decisions (for example, giving tons of money to non-factors like Antonio Bryant), is not an especially generous organization.

Brown refuses to build a practice bubble (Cincinnati is the northern-most team without such a building), and during November and December, where it gets cold outside in Cincinnati, the team often has to bus 30-45 minutes into the suburbs to practice at an indoor soccer complex. Considering the Bengals have a sweetheart deal from Hamilton County on Paul Brown Stadium, one could consider this football owner malpractice.

2) Brown might have too much power. He’s the owner, so technically this is allowed. But Brown also refuses to hire a general manager – he actually pays himself a GM bonus – and he makes many of the personnel decisions. While his father, Paul Brown, was a legendary coach and owner, the Bengals have made only two playoff appearances since Paul Brown died in 1991. What does that tell you?

Plus, Brown has very publically overruled his coach. Again, he’s the owner, so he can do what he wants. But when Brown brought back the late Chris Henry in 2008, Lewis already had objected to the move. Brown did it anyway, emasculating Lewis to the locker room.

3) Lewis is popular with the players, but overall, his tenure has been only moderately successful (if you compare him with the Bengals coaches that came before him, though, Lewis has been like Vince Lombardi). While Brown is unfailingly loyal to his coaches – he’s let the worst of the worst coach out their contracts – he might feel he can do better than Lewis if he has to pay somebody $4-5 million a year. If Lewis walks – and he very well could – the Bengals have one of the most-respected up-and-coming assistant coaches in the league in defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer.

Chances of Lewis staying at this point (in my mind): 50-50, maybe 60-40 that he stays.

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Posted on: September 30, 2010 12:13 am
 

Drama brewing for Bengals?

Posted by Andy Benoit

Everything is fine with the Bengals. Really. The team is 2-1 and has already defeated division rival Baltimore once.

But we’re the media. It’s our job to stir the pot under the well-respected cloak of journalism (and, if need be, under the even more-respected cloak of free speech). It’s all about drama. That’s why we can write articles about a 2-1 facing possible turmoil. Head coach Marvin Lewis seems to understand this concept (understand as in, he’s aware that the media operates like this, not understand as in, he’s cool with it).
C. Benson (US Presswire)
"Not too many teams have to make excuses for winning like that, but I guess we do," Lewis said after Cincy’s 20-7 win over Carolina. "So we'll just move forward and I'll say little, our players will say less, and that's the way it will be."

Players will say less? That might seem laughable for a team in which both starting receivers have their own reality shows. But one of those receivers seems to be on board (sort of).

"I usually start the trash talking but the offense has been really stagnant,” said Chad Ochocinco, according to Joe Reedy of the Cincinnati Enquirer. “So I have to back off of that a little bit until we pick up to where we're supposed to be in and do some of the things that's expected of us offensively. It's me. No, I'm serious, everything is me. A lot of media from outside is pointing the finger. When things don't go right with us offensively, it's on me. It's my fault when everything goes wrong. I like the pressure."

Only Ochocinco could announce that he’s saying nothing and, in that same breathe, suggest that he’s the key to the offense (which, granted, is not entirely untrue).

If there is to be a distraction in 2010, everyone expects it will come from either Ochocinco or Terrell Owens demanding the ball. But don’t rule out running back Cedric Benson. The refreshingly-honest Benson said last week on Sirius Radio, per Pro Football Talk, "With all those players and names you brought up [Terrell Owens, Jordan Shipley, Jermaine Gresham, etc] they're all, except for one, directly involved in the passing game. So, I mean, if I had to guess, it seems that that's kind of the route that we're trying to go, which can be a bit frustrating because we were successful running the football last year and being a power team.

"Being that type of team got us where we ultimately wanted to be, which was in the playoffs. I don't know what would be the reason the team would want to change their identity, unless in the past season it didn't work. But that's not the case here. And, I mean, I don't know. I guess whoever's making those shots, or calling those shots, you got to kind of roll with the punches."

Benson, coming off a 1,200-yard campaign, is in the final year of his contract. He’ll turn 28 in late December, which means 2011 will be his last chance at a big NFL payday. It makes perfect sense that he’d prefer a ground-oriented attack this season.

Who knows, if Carson Palmer keeps completing well under 60 percent of his passes, perhaps Benson will get his wish. (By the way…did we just accidentally touch on what might be a real problem in Cincinnati?).

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Posted on: September 28, 2010 9:59 am
Edited on: September 28, 2010 5:07 pm
 

Top Ten with a Twist: Biggest problems

Mike Singletary has led his San Francisco squad to an 0-3 start to the season (AP).
Posted by Josh Katzowitz

The first game, if your favorite team has a bad day at the office, you can forgive it. “Ah, it’s just one game,” you might say. “My men have plenty of time, and it was the first game of the season. Obviously, they haven’t worked out all the kinks.” You can still sleep at night.

The second game, if your team stinks up the joint again, you can forgive it. With reservations. “OK, it’s only two games. The season is still long. You can still make the playoffs if you start it out 0-2. They’re still figuring things out.” You still sleep at night, though probably not as soundly.

By the third game, though, if your team is still playing really, really poorly, you might have a tough time catching those Z's. By game three, problem teams – and problem players – are becoming more “the trend” and less “just a phase.” Your team might really suck, after all. Your favorite player might officially be over the hill.

You might officially have a problem.

10. Carson Palmer:
I’ve watched Palmer closely the past five or six years, and after the Jets beat Cincinnati in the playoffs last year, I wrote Palmer was no longer an elite quarterback (you can’t be elite, after all, if your stats fall somewhere between Jason Campbell and David Garrard). He’s continued his struggles this year, and though, the Bengals don’t need him quite as much if they have a healthy Cedric Benson, you can close the book on him as one of the best in the game.

9. Shawne Merriman’s Achilles/Andre Johnson’s ankle: Let’s combine two annoying injuries for players who would do well to stay on the field. Merriman, who missed much of the preseason because of a holdout/Achilles injury, played the last two weeks, but he had to leave Sunday’s contest because of a calf injury. Though he’s not the player he once was, he’s a better option for San Diego than Antwan Applewhite and Brandon Lang. And Johnson’s ankle is self-explanatory. If he’s not on the field – and he’s had to miss part of the past two games – the Texans offense isn’t nearly as potent.

8. David Garrard: I know, I hate putting two QBs on here in the first three picks, but, unlike Palmer, I’m not sure why Garrard is still playing with the first string. I mean, aside from Todd Bouman (hasn’t thrown a pass in five seasons) being his only backup. Coach Jack Del Rio was asked how much longer he could play Garrard, and Del Rio said as long as he was the team’s best option. Meaning he’s the team’s only option. Which is bad news.

7. Ben Roethlisberger’s return:
This isn’t about Roethlisberger necessarily and I assume coach Mike Tomlin will give him back his job when he returns from his four-game suspension, but the Steelers could be 4-0 playing a combination of Dennis Dixon and Charlie Batch. Roethlisberger obviously is a better QB than either of those two, but he’ll probably be rusty. What if he struggles against the Browns in his first game? What if Miami’s defense lights him up the week after that? Will Steelers fans be chanting Charlie Batch’s name (probably not, but you never know …)?

6. Brandyn Dombrowski:
So, how soon can Marcus McNeill return for San Diego? Dombrowski, playing LT and trying to protect Philip Rivers’ blindside, had a tough time against Seattle on Sunday, Chris Clemons toasted him a few times to sack Rivers, and on the Chargers’ first attempt to get within two late in the game – the first time Rivers hit TE Antonio Gates – Dombrowski was called for holding. San Diego coach Norv Turner has defended him, but Dombrowski had a rough one in the Chargers loss.

G. Hartley had a rough week for New Orleans last week and is in danger of losing his job (AP). 5. Garrett Hartley: It’s hard to believe how badly Hartley missed his game-winning 29-yard field goal in overtime of the Falcons victory against the Saints. Coach Sean Payton has shown plenty of loyalty to Hartley, but Hartley directly cost New Orleans the game Sunday. How many more games will he negatively impact the Saints before he’s off the team? Maybe, none. John Carney and Matt Stover apparently have tried out for the Saints this week, and at this point, if Hartley lasts the year in New Orleans, it’d be kind of a surprise. 

4. The entire AFC/NFC West: We’ll get into San Francisco’s Mike Singletary in a minute, but man, how inconsistent have these conferences been? Oakland has been terrible (against Tennessee), less terrible (a win against St. Louis), and almost not terrible enough to win again (a 24-23 loss to Arizona). Derek Anderson has worked his anti-magic for the Cardinals. And you still don’t know what you’re going to get when Seattle runs onto the field for the game. I'm still shocked St. Louis beat Washington. These divisions are wide open for the taking, especially when Kansas City starts 3-0 and leads the AFC West.

3. Chargers kick return coverage:
OK, so you saw what Leon Washington did against San Diego on Sunday, returning a kick for 101 yards for the TD and then returning another kick for 99 yards. That was unreal. But don’t forget about Kansas City’s Dexter McCluster, who had a 94-yard punt return in the season opener vs. San Diego. On Monday, several Chargers veterans volunteered for special teams duties in order to help improve that unit. Hey, it certainly couldn’t hurt.

2. Giants discipline:
Remember how Antrel Rolle complained about how much control the coaching staff held over the players? Well, that’s not exactly true, especially when we’re talking about New York’s 11 penalties, including five personal fouls that occurred after the play was over, in its bad loss to Tennessee. Two 15-yarders came courtesy of RT Kareem McKenzie (behavior McKenzie called “despicable” the next day), and Rolle incurred one when he tried to punch Tennessee TE Craig Stevens. With performances like that, you have to wonder what kind of control coach Tom Coughlin actually asserts over his players. And how much longer he’ll be in control of the Giants at all.

1. Mike Singletary:
After the 49ers 31-10 beatdown by the Chiefs, word filtered out that Kansas City’s defenders apparently were calling out San Francisco’s play calls before the plays were actually run. Now, the 49ers are 0-3, and maybe, aside from pulling down his pants to motivate his team, Singletary doesn’t exactly seem like an X’s and O’s guy. He actually was asked after the game if he had been outcoached, and he said, “I would not say ‘outcoached.’ When you have a loss like this, a lot of things look wrong.” Like the offense. And a day after backing his offensive coordinator Jimmy Raye and saying he’d be around the rest of the season, Singletary fired him. That means new offensive coordinator Mike Johnson continues the streak of Alex Smith never playing for the same coordinator in back-to-back seasons. I’m sure that will help.

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Posted on: September 27, 2010 4:02 pm
 

Hot Routes 9.27.10 box score tidbits

Posted by Andy Benoit

After Tony Romo said the Cowboys needed to get the running game going, Marion Barber had 17 carries for a hard-fought 55 yards against the Texans. Felix Jones showed most of the usual speed and quickness that he, for whatever reason, hadn’t displayed the first two weeks. Jnes gained 43 yards on seven carries.

The 49ers managed just 43 yards on the ground against a Chiefs defense that ranked 31st against the run last season. (Granted, it is a much-improved Chiefs defense. But still…)

Frank Gore didn’t get going on the ground, but he amassed yards on nine catches. Michael Crabtree, however, has just six catches for 81 yards…on the season.L. Tomlinson (US Presswire)

3 sacks for Chiefs underrated, over-energized OLB Tamba Hali. The fifth-year pro also recorded two tackles for a loss.

The Lions were 3/12 on third down against the Vikings. But the Vikings were 3/11 on third down against the Lions. Fun game.

The Patriots ripped off 200 yards rushing against the Bills. Forty two of those yards game from ex-Jet Danny Woodhead. Ninety eight came from BenJarvus Green-Ellis, who is fast become a favorite of the coaching staff.

Rookie tight end Aaron Hernandez had another strong outing, leading the Patriots with six catches for 65 yards. He also set a tight end team record for longest run: 13 yards. (Eat your heart out Ben Coates…or whoever had the record to begin with.)

Great day for tight ends in New Orleans. Jeremy Shockey had eight catches for 78 yards and a score (most of the catches were of the usual manhood-validating variety that Shockey has mastered). Tony Gonzalez, not to be outdone, had eight catches for 110 yards and a touchdown.

Counting assists, every Saints linebacker posted double digit tackles against the Falcons.

Chris Johnson had 125 yards against the Giants, but it took him 32 carries to get it. He looked exhausted by the second quarter.

23:28 = Panthers time of possession against the Bengals. 23:28 might also equal Carson Palmer’s 40 time. Of course, with a cannon arm, Palmer doesn’t need to run. But does Palmer still have cannon arm? He was 19/37 for 195 yards, his second straight game under 200 yards passing. There are whispers that Palmer still doesn’t look like his pre-elbow surgery self.

Ryan Torain led the Redskins with 46 yards on seven carries. Remember the name – this guy will probably wind up being the team’s top rusher in the second half of the season.

David Garrard somehow threw 31 incompletion on 30 pass attempts. Just kidding. But seriously, Garrard was bad. 13/30 for 105 yards and a pick.

Michael Vick ran the ball only four times against the Jags (30 yards and a touchdown).

After Sunday’s game, 10 of DeSean Jackson’s 18 career touchdowns have been 50 yards or longer.

The Chargers had five turnovers and gave up two kickoff returns for touchdowns at Seattle. That’s what it takes to nullify a career-high 455 yards passing from Philip Rivers.

LaDainian Tomlinson has taken over as the No. 1 running back for the Jets. He had 15 carries against the Dolphins, five more than Shonn Greene had. Tomlinson managed a hearty 70 yards on the night.


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Posted on: September 21, 2010 12:51 pm
 

Harbaugh takes $15,000 hit

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Ravens coach John Harbaugh has been fined $15,000 for impermissible verbal and physical contact with an official, according to the Baltimore Sun’s Jamison Hensley.

During Baltimore’s 15-10 loss to Cincinnati, Harbaugh made contact with line judge Ron Marinucci where, according to the Sun, “he was demonstrating how Terrell Suggs legally hit Bengals quarterback Carson Palmer in the ‘strike zone.’”

“I was a little animated in describing the strike zone, and I think he understood the emotions of it,” Harbaugh told reporters Monday. “I’ll make sure that I let him know that I think I was over the line in my animation without question, and that’s never something you want to do. And the point is we had great conversations with those guys throughout the game. We respected – we disagreed and it was animated – but it was respectful throughout. And I know Ron understood that it was respectful, so it should be OK.”

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Posted on: September 20, 2010 4:59 pm
 

Gregg Doyel talks Bengals-Ravens

Posted by Will Brinson

The Bengals and Ravens played a not-so-exciting (but kind of typical for the AFC North) game on Sunday. CBSSports.com's Gregg Doyel was on-hand, and as such, we thought we'd one of our two (love you too, Freeman) national columnists on the phone to talk about what he saw.

Also, we figured there was a decent chance that he'd say something that would make people mad. Like, perhaps, calling Terrell Owens and Chad Ochocinco "clowns" or Marvin Lewis "not a real man." We're not saying whether or not those things actually happened, so you'll need to listen to the podcast yourself in order to find out.

Plus, if you're confused as to why Ray Rice only got 16 carries and why Joe Flacco stinks right now, there are answers for those.

Listen below and don't forget to subscribe via iTunes .

If you can't view the podcast, click here to download .


For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow  @cbssportsnfl   on Twitter   and subscribe to our  RSS Feed .
Posted on: September 20, 2010 4:29 pm
 

F&R NFL Approval Matrix: Week 2

Posted by Will Brinson

Our affinity for graphs and charts and purty pictures knows no bounds, so (with a nod to the smartypants at NY Mag ), we present our first-ever NFL approval matrix. Suggestions, complaints and intellecutual property lawsuits may be directed to us on Twitter (@CBSSportsNFL).

Click to make larger /embiggen .


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com