Play Fantasy The Most Award Winning Fantasy game with real time scoring, top expert analysis, custom settings, and more. Play Now
 
Tag:John Fox
Posted on: November 10, 2010 2:25 pm
 

Clausen, Goodson starting for Panthers

Posted by Will Brinson

Because you didn't get enough about the Panthers in the awesome column about their coaching situation from earlier, here's something for you: Jimmy Clausen and Mike Goodson will start for Carolina on Sunday at Tampa Bay.

Clausen is kind of expected, as Matt Moore is done for the year and his only competition is Tony Pike, the rookie out of Cincinnati. If Clausen struggles, though, don't be surprised to see John Fox give Pike some run.

Goodson is the backup to the backup to the backup in Carolina (and you could even argue one more backup there with Tyrell Sutton in play), but because of injuries to Jonathan Stewart (concussion), DeAngelo Williams (foot sprain) and Sutton (ankle), Goodson could get the majority of touches for the Panthers.

In fact, he's one out of that group who practiced Wednesday, and so Fox went ahead and named him the starter.

There's still a chance that Williams, who's day-to-day, could play in Week 10, but considering the Panthers only have pride left to play for, they're certainly not going to force the franchise's best player onto the field if he's not ready to go.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: November 9, 2010 10:44 pm
Edited on: November 9, 2010 10:45 pm
 

Otah to IR, 'Cats grab Brown, Williams to play?

Posted by Will Brinson

We can probably put the Carolina Panthers season to bed -- officially anyway -- today, as the 'Cats put tackle Jeff Otah on injured reserve, ending his season. 

Otah might not seem like the key to a franchise resurrection, but his season-long absence has been a tremendous hinderance to a typically powerful ground game. Missing Otah meant moving Geoff Schwartz from his natural right guard to right tackle, and an overall weakening of the line.

Now, DeAngelo Williams' injury doesn't exactly help things, and as things stand right now, the Panthers might be rolling with just Mike Goodson on Sunday against the Buccaneers -- which is why they claimed Andre Brown (a local product who attended Rose in Greenville, NC, and then NC State) off of waivers when the Colts dropped him.

Although Darin Gantt of the Rock Hill Herald pointed out Tuesday night that Williams was spotted "walking without a boot or limp Monday." So maybe, given the likelihood that Stewart will miss time, Williams can go against Tampa's weak run defense.

Brown might see some burn as a backup to the backup (five times over) if Williams can't play on against Tampa, but he probably won't spur a Panthers winning streak.

Not that any one player, outside of an MVP-caliber quarterback, really could this point.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: November 4, 2010 3:06 pm
Edited on: November 4, 2010 3:31 pm
 

Dey Took Er Jobs: We Talking About Stamina

Posted by Will Brinson

On Sunday, Mike Shanahan inexplicably pulled Donovan McNabb in favor of Rex Grossman. Were it not for Randy Moss and Brad Childress, that's all anyone would have talked about Monday and Tuesday.

To counter said distraction, Shanahan and the Redskins brought in Jamarcus Russell for a tryout.

As much as all of that reads like an Onion Sports story, it's the truth, folks -- and as such we have some sort of a quarterback controversy going down with the 4-4 Redskins.

Well, perhaps "controversy" is too strong a word. After all, Grossman isn't as good as McNabb, and Russell, who weighed in at 286 pounds, might have trouble making a Lingerie Football League team. (Actually, he might have an easier time getting on an NFL squad than that, but you see the point.)

The hemming and hawing of Shanny was the worst of it all -- he originally claimed that Grossman was better at running the two-minute offense (clearly a) a lie and b) patently wrong) and then decided that McNabb wasn't in good enough shape to stay on the field.

Regardless of why, Kyle Shanahan (yes, son of Mike) protege Grossman entered the game and immediately guaranteed the Lions a win with a fumble-turned-touchdown.

We understand now that there are locker room issues with Washington (I mean, duh, right?) thanks to Shanahan's decision, and that while he certainly doesn't have the problems of the aforementioned Childress, he's getting dangerously close to blowing up a Washington season that once had promise.

Will Grossman start for the Redskins the rest of the way home? We can only hope so -- after all, that means when the Vikings sign McNabb next year, Leslie Frazier will finally get the respect he deserves.

Whatever, that's a lot of projection, but is it really worth discussing whether or not Grossman should replace McNabb in the starting lineup? Of course it's not -- if the possibility of David Carr replacing Alex Smith in San Francisco a mind-boggling mishap of mediocrity (and it was, as I said and then we saw) then this is just a slap in the face to common sense.

Most coaches go out of their way to avoid quarterbacks controversies like these -- somehow, Mike Shanahan has managed to invite one, while also insulting his veteran leader and the only talented quarterback on the roster.

No amount of humiliation-based motivation is worth the obvious downside to this. And swapping out McNabb for Grossman at this stage would just be proof that Shanny had his brain surgically replaced with Dan Snyder's.

****


Speaking of the 49ers, Troy Smith did a pretty good job of making sure that David Carr won't be seeing the field as a starter (there are always injuries, and he'll seemingly always get a job based on just potential, sigh) any time soon.

But what happens when Alex Smith returns in a few weeks? At that point, Troy will have had multiple weeks with reps as the starter and possibly even more wins than Alex, in many less tries.

It's not like we're discussing someone off the street either -- Troy has the credentials to a degree (the Heisman Trophy has to be worth something, right???) and reasonable stats when he started. His accuracy isn't as good percentage wise as Alex, but he doesn't cough the ball up as much, and San Fran is very much a Frank Gore-based team.

Just saying we shouldn't be so quick to roll right back to Alex just because he was the top pick a few years ago.

****
Matt Moore and Derek Anderson will continue getting the nod -- both moves are the smart play, in reasonably similar situations -- both teams are equal at -65 in point differential, both have star wide receivers, both have a talented pair of running backs that are underperforming, both teams have rookie quarterbacks they believe to be the future, etc., etc. The only difference is that the Cardinals are in a crappy division. And given the way Jimmy Clausen and Max Hall have played, which is to say, "not good," it behooves both coaches to allow their youngsters to develop on the bench and learn while watching for a little while.

****
Pants on Fire (Hot Seat Watch)

- Brad Childress: If I fired Andy right now, no one would notice or care, but the bosses would probably say "um, why did you do that without telling us?" and then fire me too. (Just kidding, I don't have hiring/firing power. And if anything, I'm the Randy Moss of the group. You should see what happens when my coffee isn't premium brand.) Thin ice for Chilly.

- John Fox: Someone asked Sean Payton if he would be willing to hire Fox as an assistant next year, even though Fox still has a job (technically). That's an indication of something, insomuch as 1-6 is at least.

- Wade Phillips: At some point, the awkwardness of Wade's eventual firing will wear off. Thank goodness he doesn't have a primetime game this week!

- Jack Del Rio: Betting against Del Rio when his job is on the line is like betting against Michael Jordan these days. Still, the Jags are going to be hard pressed to make the playoffs in that division with that talent and you have to think Wayne Weaver will at least explore something new once the CBA gets sorted out.

- Mike Singletary: The bright side of eventually losing the NFC West race to the Seahawks and Rams is that he'll be immediately employed as a six figure motivational speaker.

- Marvin Lewis: No one's really talking about Lewis' job being in jeopardy because it's too easy to place blame on Carson Palmer for stinking. But there's a lot of talent on this team and they're underachieving badly.

- Josh McDaniels: The biggest problem for Pat Bowlen is that admitting he messed up with McDaniels is about as fun as Mike Shanahan admitting he messed up with Grossman. Which is like full circle or something, man.

- Norv Turner: A win against the Texans on the road would go a long way towards keeping Norvell safe, particularly with divisional games coming up and Vincent Jackson returning. He should also give Philip Rivers 10 percent of his paycheck for winning games with a receiving corps only outflanked in mediocrity by the Bolts' special teams.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: October 29, 2010 11:03 am
Edited on: October 29, 2010 11:06 am
 

Hot Routes 10.29.10 injured players returning

Hot Routes

Posted by Andy Benoit

Steven Jackson underwent finger surgery this week, but he says he is definitely going to play.


With Roberto Garza’s return to health, the Bears offensive line will once again be tweaked.


Donte’ Stallworth could return to the Ravens November 7th (as if the Ravens need another receiver). Stallworth has been out since the preseason with a foot injury.


Falcons veteran safety Erik Coleman is learning to cope as a backup.


Rex Ryan and Ray Lewis have settled any differences they may have had. They chatted at a banquet dinner on Saturday night.

Here’s one writer already making a case for John Fox to coach the Cowboys.


Here’s another saying it should be Jon Gruden.


Carson Palmer sat out practice for the Bengals on Thursday. He has a sore hip.


The sentiment around Cleveland is that the Browns need to stick with Colt McCoy at quarterback. (Oh, and that LeBron is still a jerk.)


Everyone is talking about how DE Derrick Harvey got benched in Jacksonville. Few headlines have actually mentioned who got promoted. For the record, the new starter is Jeremy Mincey.


Remember Mark Simoneau? He’s a Chief now.


With Charles Woodson and the Packers coming to town this Sunday, Rex Ryan can’t let the 2009 Defensive Player of the Year debate go.


Russ Grimm will be trying to beat his son’s team when the Bucs face the Cardinals this Sunday.

Posted on: October 28, 2010 4:35 pm
Edited on: October 28, 2010 5:18 pm
 

Carolina's running attack is struggling

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Many people realized there was a pretty good chance the Panthers would have a tough time passing the ball this season. Matt Moore was inexperienced, and rookie Jimmy Clausen couldn’t be expected to a) win the starting job or b) perform well if for some reason he did have to start a game.

But the running game was supposed to (sort of) make up for it with RBs DeAngelo Williams and Jonathan Stewart – both of whom rushed for more than 1,100 yards last year in Carolina.

Williams That hasn’t happened, though. Through the team’s first six games, Stewart has recorded 148 yards (a 3.0 yards per carry average) and one touchdown, while Williams (top mugshot to the right) has gained 361 yards (a 4.1 average) and one score.

So, what’s the problem?

“This game's a lot easier when your opponent's one-dimensional," coach John Fox said, via the Charlotte Observer. "I think to be dual-dimensional's important. Unfortunately, we haven't had a chance to do that.

"We haven't done it effectively enough, yet."

Stewart To make matters worse, Williams’ foot is hurt and he missed practice Wednesday, and Stewart continues to have pain in his left Achilles.

Stewart (bottom mug shot), meanwhile, tries to remain optimistic.

"Instead of building up frustration, you've just got to believe in the guys in front of us that eventually things will start opening up the way they're supposed to," Stewart said. "That's not just the guys up front. That's everybody on the whole entire offense doing their job. It's a collective deal."

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .

Posted on: October 27, 2010 3:28 pm
Edited on: October 27, 2010 5:48 pm
 

Dey Took Er Jobs: 'What's Best for the Team'?

Dey Took Er Jobs takes a look at the various job controversies around the league. If you don't get the title, you don't watch enough South Park . 

Week 7 might see an unusual number of coaches actually doing 'what's best for their team' (Brad Childress' words) when it comes to quarterback decisions.

Or perhaps not -- many an external factor can change a coach's choice on who to start.

Let's begin in Minnesota, or, technically, in New England -- where the Vikings will take on the Patriots in a game that's got a storyline or two.

There's Randy Moss' return to New England after being traded from the Pats earlier this season, a monumental factor that's being even more monumentally overshadowed by the fact that every single bone in Brett Favre's foot has been reduced to little tiny pieces in the past week or so.

OK, that's a stretch, but we do know it's a pretty severe injury. Or, at least some of us do.

"You're talking to the wrong guy to rate severity," Childress said. "I just know how they were advertised to me, and I didn't use any [medical definitions] that weren't said to me."

Chilling words (pun intended) from a coach who seems to be more passive-aggressive than anything when it comes to making a decision about who'll start for him under center.

The pervasive understanding sure seems to be that Childress, if he had his druthers or any, ahem, "juevos rancheros" at all, would start Tavaris Jackson at quarterback for the Vikings. This would require Childress being in charge, though, and his description of Favre's injury ("an evolving situation") is pretty indicative that he's not.

Favre doesn't call the shots, of course, but it's pretty clear that if he wants to play, he's going to play, despite what he says; and yeah, the same thing applies to his streak of 291 consecutive games.

"I don't want to go out there for one play, I don't want to go out there for three plays," Favre said. "If I'm able to play, I want to play the whole game and give us the best chance to win."

That's utter baloney, regardless of how nice it sounds coming from Favre. He prides himself on his iron man status as much as anything, and it's pretty obvious that if he can get that next start, he's going to get that next start, even if it's at the expense of Minnesota's success.

The only thing that could stop him is Childress stepping in, telling everyone involved that Favre is going to take a week off, get rested and thereby putting the burden on Adrian Peterson to control the game and Tavaris Jackson to make one or two big throws without any huge mistakes.

It's a plausible proposition, but probably one that won't come to fruition. But only because Favre wants to keep his streak intact grit out a win just too damn much.

****


The Titans might offer up the spiciest of all job situations, because Jeff Fisher's shown in the past he doesn't give a flip who throws the ball for his team, as long as they help Tennessee win.

Kenny Britt's emergence as a potential true No. 1 wideout -- even if he's facing future discipline -- under Kerry Collins might make the decision easier.

Clearly Vince Young has potential and whatnot, but he's remarkably inconsistent, and Collins has had tremendous success with Fisher, most notably in stealing V.Y.'s starting spot two years ago and last week against the Eagles, when he lead a measty comeback in Nashville that featured Britt catching three touchdowns for 225 yards.

As long as Tennessee has Chris Johnson, it'll obviously be dangerous, and with a bye week coming after the Titans tangle with the Chargers in San Diego Sunday, it makes a whole lotta sense for Fisher to give V.Y.'s a quite convenient extra week of rest on his injured leg.

Will ownership want that no? Probably not. Will Vince? Definitely not. Does Fisher care? Absolutely not -- a win in San Diego gives Tennessee establishes the Titans as a legitimate threat to win the AFC (if that wasn't clear already), and "CSI:Nashville" knows that keeping Collins under center for now gives them the best chance to win.

At least until he does his best "Kerry Collins in the first of 2009" impersonation -- but that's what Vince Young's sitting there for!

****
The Eagles finally make their way to the bottom of this piece (or at least the middle anyway), and with good reason -- Kevin Kolb showed Sunday why Michael Vick should be the starter.

(Ironically, yes, that was while Collins showed he should start over Young, but that's neither here nor there.)

Look, we've said it plenty of times, but Kolb's plenty good and will play plenty of snaps for the Eagles at some point; he's just a different animal than Vick.

Last week we talked about how Kolb, even when posting monster numbers against Atlanta, still looked a little weak-armed. This won't change. Ever.

And Vick is, when healthy, one of the most dynamic quarterbacks in the NFL -- he'll start until he forgets how fragile his ribcage is and takes off on an ill-advised run down the middle of the field towards the goal line. Again.

****


Perhaps the best decision by any coach -- and it's an odd choice if only because of who the coach is -- will happen in London, where Mike Singletary decided to plug in Troy Smith as the starter while Alex Smith is out.

There's no telling if Troy will start for the entire two-to-three week duration that Alex is supposed to miss, but it doesn't really matter: Frank Gore would be a better option than David Carr.

Plenty of people probably weren't watching the stinker of a game he gave up in Charlotte, but believe me, he has no business taking snaps as a starter in the NFL ever again. It's like drafting Michael Clayton in fantasy -- just because he's a top pick and has tons of talent doesn't mean he has to succeed eventually.

Cut him and move on. (Oh wait, that happened in real life too. Ha.)

****
Los Pantalones Fuegos (We're talking about jobs so we might as well mentions who's seat is hot, no?)

- Mike Singletary: Right now he's getting a few too many votes of confidence. A blowout overseas at the hands of a Denver team that got torched by the Raiders last week could push him to the brink.

- Brad Childress: Weird how so many of the guys with quarterback situations are mentioned here right? 2-6 to start the season could make it worth Minnesota's while to see what Leslie Frazier can do as a head coach.

- John Fox: It's hot all season, but a win against the Rams would go a long way towards keeping him in town through 2010.

- Josh McDaniels: It wasn't the losses piling up, but the way in which they piled up (read: giving up nearly 60 points to division rival Oakland).

- Wade Phillips: Tony Romo's injury almost guaranteed that he won't be fired until the end of the season, if that's any consolation.

- Jack Del Rio: Losing to a Jon Kitna-led Cowboys team just before the bye could seal his fate. Kitna will do that to you.

- Lovie Smith: He's only slightly less delusional than Singletary. And he has four wins, so that helps.

****
Quickly …

- Needless to say, giving the job to Colt McCoy was the right call for Eric Mangini. Kid's kind of hard to root against.

- Max Hall's the starter for Arizona if he's healthy and that makes the most sense given that the only other option is still Derek Anderson. It's simple science, really.

- Apparently Washingtonians want Rex Grossman to get a shot over Donovan McNabb. Please go monitor a midterm, folks -- there's more value in that.

- Darren McFadden probably has his starting job back now, I think.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: October 24, 2010 10:35 pm
Edited on: October 25, 2010 12:09 am
 

Singletary says playoffs, owners reportedly angry

Posted by Will Brinson

The San Francisco 49ers lost to the previously winless Panthers in Charlotte, 23-20, on Sunday, and with a trip to London coming up, things don't look too bright for the future of the franchise's season.

Don't tell that to Mike Singletary, though -- he thinks they can still make the playoffs!

"There's no doubt in my mind, somehow, someway, we will regroup and we will keep fighting and we will make a season of it," Singletary said. "And I still believe we can go to the playoffs. I still believe we can get those things done. We just have to get the right things in place and go from there."

Mmmm-hmmm. That's a pleasantly optimistic scenario. But as everyone's covered, they Niners are in the NFC West, and anything's kind of fair game in that division, although with the Seahawks, Cardinals and Rams all having a few more wins than anyone expected.

Plus, perhaps Singletary should delay the trip across the pond and have a little chat with the last coach (John Fox) forced to use David Carr as a starter on an extended basis -- in 2007, Carr and the Panthers appeared to have a shot at the playoffs, and they were 4-2 headed into the their bye. Then Carr turned into, well, himself, and Carolina dropped five straight and seven of their final 10 games.

Back then, though, Fox wasn't facing the same pressure as Singletary, because his job was safe. A report from Matt Maiocco of CSNBayArea.com indicates things aren't so simple on Sunday that owners John and Jed York weren't too thrilled with their coach.

"There were some grumbles from the owners about bad coaching," a source near the "inner circle" of the Yorks told Maiocco.

That's perfectly plausible, given that the Niners, a would-be playoff team, look like perhaps the worst team in the NFL relative to expectations; the Panthers showed some signs of life just as they did in 2009, the Browns flipped the defending champs at home Sunday, and at least the Bills are giving it the old college try with their depleted roster.

The Niners, on the other hand, keep getting beat (sometimes badly) by inferior opponents, and that's a clear-cut sign that their coach isn't cut out for his job.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed
Posted on: October 18, 2010 1:35 pm
Edited on: October 18, 2010 1:36 pm
 

Panthers bench Clausen, going back to Moore

Posted by Andy Benoit

Maybe we can start calling him John “Flip Flop” Fox. The Panthers head coach has reinstated Matt Moore as his starting quarterback. Moore was ineffective as the starter in Week 1. He was equally ineffective in Week 2 before being knocked out of the game.

Second-round rookie Jimmy Clausen started in Weeks 3, 4 and 5. Clausen somehow managed to be even less effective than Moore. In fact, Fox benched Clausen in favor of Moore late in the team’s Week 5 loss against the Bears when it became apparent that the Panthers would need to throw to get back in the game.

You following all this? Basically, we’re examining a team that has no options under center. Maybe GM Marty Hurney still has Vinny Testaverde’s number.

Moore and Clausen are both coming off their best week of the season, but that’s only because Carolina just had its bye. Fox said on Monday that Moore would get the nod this week against the 49ers (perhaps the only team in football with more quarterback drama than the Panthers).

Of the decision, Fox said, “We have struggled on offense since the beginning of the season, and sometimes it helps to step back and watch and Matt has had a chance to do that.” The Panthers currently have the league’s worst-rated passing attack.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com