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Tag:Allen Wranglers
Posted on: February 14, 2012 8:14 pm
Edited on: February 14, 2012 8:16 pm
 

T.O., nearly broke, doesn't want your pity

Owens says he trusted the wrong people and now he's nearly broke and facing mounting bills. (Getty Images)

By Ryan Wilson

The NFL season may be over but that doesn't mean there's no football on the horizon. Yes, the NFL Combine is less than two weeks away but the same day that offensive linemen and tight ends go through their on-field paces at Lucas Oil Stadium, Terrell Owens will be making is IFL debut with the Allen Wranglers.

Okay, you were probably expecting a bit more in the "Wait, there's still football!" build up. And we suspect that, come Februrary 25, many of you will opt to watch 350-pound guys run 40 yards in a straight line (possible unintentional comedy value) over T.O.'s not-so-triumphant return to football (if you're into tragicomedy, then maybe Owens and the Wranglers are for you).

Part of the reason T.O. signed up for IFL duty is because he had burned a lot of NFL bridges. And of those left standing, no one was interested enough in a 37-year-old wide receiver with behavior-management issues to give him a shot. So the Wranglers, where Owens is also co-owner, was his only football-playing option. Exacerbating matters: T.O., who was in the NFL for 15 seasons and signed contracts worth $80 million, is nearly broke.

Appearing on ESPN Radio recently, Owens, however, said people shouldn't feel sorry for him.

"Absolutely not," he said via Sports Radio Interviews. "As far as my situation? The thought that I’ve lost $80 million dollars? That’s a little bit skewed considering like you said if you look at the years and the contracts that I have had and me not actually completing a couple of those contracts in their entirety.

"Again no matter what I have lost money," he continued. "It’s partially my fault because I didn’t manage and I wasn’t on top of my financial people as I should have. Again who’s to say how much I lost? Have I lost money? Yeah. Was it $80 million? I doubt it. But at the same time I feel like this is a situation for me to go out and speak and let a lot of guys know that are coming into the National Football League or any league for that matter … When you have financial advisors that you’re dealing with and that are on their team that are supposed to be taking care of their finances … I feel victim to it because I had heard about these stories prior to it happening to me and there’s going to be some other stories after me. The fact that I took for granted the orientations and the seminars that we had during the course of football season where these guys basically came in and tried to help us, facilitate us and educate us on your financial matters. I didn’t take advantage of that because I was referred to this guy that mismanaged my situation by my agent and my marketing guys."

Owens first spoke publicly about his financial situation in the January issue of GQ, even recounting one story where a friend, "a guy who I'd helped when his grandmother passed," drained one of his bank accounts of more than $270,000. He says the bank returned the money but "it pretty much destroyed whatever trust in people I had left." The article says that Owens never had many friends — teammates never called him to party, he says, wrongly assuming that he was "too big" to socialize — and now, "I don't have no friends. I don't want no friends. That's how I feel."

His agent, Drew Rosenhaus, called when he found out Owens had taken huge finiancial losses.

"When Drew heard about what had happened with my money, he said, 'Oh man, is there anything I can do?' " Owens told GQ. "And I said, 'Dude, are you going to give me my money back? I don't think so, so why bother trying to appease me?' " (Rosenhaus' response: "In my opinion, the conversation did not go down that way." )

Now T.O. is left with barely anything in the bank, plenty of Bills -- including child support payments to four women that total $44,600 a month -- and until he signed with the Wranglers, no discernible income.

"Now I’m even hungrier to get back on top and do the things I think the way I should have been doing it," he told ESPN Radio. "I’ve had some people who have supposedly been in my corner that have my bests interests in heart and I’ve come to find out that’s not what happened. Again I will reiterate it is partially my fault because I wasn’t doing my due diligence to be on top of my own finances and it’s a sad situation.”

And that brings us back to the Wranglers. T.O. will make his debut in 11 days.

"…I’m using this as a platform really to keep myself in shape. The business side of it too is something that intrigued me, being a co-owner with the team, so again this is me transitioning into life after football. That’s the business side of it, obviously football doesn’t last forever and I feel I’m physically fit and can play at a productive level to where I can play a couple more years in the National Football League and that’s what I’m pushing for," he said. 

"Other than that I’m not going to give up hope just because somebody says that I’m 38 and I just had a knee injury. Injuries are part of the game. I think everybody knows my track record … I work out hard, I’m going to do whatever I can to get back on the field and get back to 100 percent and I’m doing that.”

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Posted on: February 12, 2012 7:30 pm
 

T.O. on NFL: I wasn't a bad teammate, disruptive

After 15 seasons and five teams, T.O.'s NFL career appears to be over. (Getty Images)

By Ryan Wilson

Terrell Owens last played in an NFL game on December 19, 2010 as a member of the Bengals. It was his first and last year in Cincinnati, one half of the self-proclaimed "Batman and Robin" along with Chad Ochocinco. The duo was so dynamic that quarterback Carson Palmer opted for retirement over another year in Cincy, T.O. wasn't re-signed and Ochocinco was shipped off to New England.

Owens, then 37, was allowed to walk for reasons other than his on-field skills. In 14 games during the 2010 season, he caught 72 passes for 983 yards including 10 touchdowns. Still, despite holding midseason 2011 workouts to show that he had fully recovered from knee surgery, Owens didn't get a sniff from any of the 32 NFL teams. Ultimately, he ended up joining the Allen Wranglers of the Indoor Football League where he is also a co-owner.

T.O. appearing recently on KESN-FM, spoke about about his year away from the NFL and his IFL future.

"I'm using this as a platform to keep myself in shape," he said according to the Dallas Morning News. "The business end of it is something that intrigued me, being a co-owner with the team.

"This is me transitioning to life after football. I feel I'm physically fit and can play at a productive level to where I can play a couple of more years in the National Football League. That's what I'm pushing for. I'm not going to give up hope just because I'm 38 and just had a knee injury. I think a lot of why I probably didn't play this year, everybody keeps talking about the 'character' issues. The last two or three years relatively I was quiet, knowing that everybody was saying that I had a character issue, I'm disruptive, there's a lot of hype that comes with me, they're saying I'm a distraction here and there.

"That's all hearsay," Owens continued. "If you ask a bunch of my teammates, a lot of it is basically blown out of proportion, the media making me into a fall guy. Overall, will I ever admit that I was a bad teammate? Never. I wasn't a bad teammate. Was I disruptive. No I wasn't disruptive."

Here's the thing: Owens, as far as we know, was never arrested for beating his girlfriend or making it rain or carrying a concealed weapon. But it's also a stretch to say that he wasn't, at one time or another, disruptive. Owens implied that former teammate Jeff Garcia was gay, and then there was the falling out with Donovan McNabb. So, yeah, there's some revisionist history going on because, realistically, Owens could've helped a WR-needy team last season if not for he fact that he was, you know, a huge disruption.

"I feel like I have a lot of football left and I'm looking forward to getting back to playing," he said. "I think the thing ... I didn't get picked up was that a lot of general managers bought into the fact that the media thinks that I'm this bad guy, this rebel guy, this disruptive guy that divides and messes up team's chemistry. They won't allow me to turn over a new leaf. They won't allow me to be a better person. Anytime anything is brought up about me, they keep talking about things that happened five, six, seven years ago. Why don't I get a pass? I've kind of fallen into that villain category and I can't get out of that box."

And at 38, Owens likely won't get a chance, at least not in the NFL.

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Posted on: January 18, 2012 11:48 pm
Edited on: January 19, 2012 11:44 am
 

T.O., with more controversy, will join IFL

T. Owens has made more controversy in an upcoming GQ interview (US Presswire).

By Josh Katzowitz

Terrell Owens, with his money problems and desire to return to the NFL, has had a tough time staying out of the news in his first season out of the NFL. But late Wednesday night, Owens finally had some positive career news to share.

And now, it's official: Owens says he'll return to professional football with the Allen Wranglers of the Indoor Football League.

In a video he posted on Beeyoo.com, Owens proclaimed the following: "Uh-oh, it's official. It just went down. I'm headed back to Texas. That's right. IFL here I come. Allen, Tx., Here I come. I'm gonna be me. Allen, Tx., I'll see you in the end zone."

As we wrote before, players only make $225 per game in the IFL, and they get a bonus for winning. Owens' paycheck, though, figures to be much larger than that, as the Wranglers put out a story on their website last month that said his compensation package could be worth between $250,000-500,000 (it seems likely Owens would have an ownership stake in the franchise if that's the case).

"I'm sure Cowboys fans and all football fans in the area would love to get T.O. back." Wranglers coach Patrick Pimmel said last month. "Terrell would be a great addition to our organization and I hope we can make this happen."

Now, the Wranglers and Owens have. But that doesn't mean Owens isn't still causing controversy of the negative persuasion.

It came to light Wednesday that Owens made an accusation in the February issue of GQ in which he’s said that before he was to read an apology to his Eagles teammates for his behavior in 2005, Jeremiah Trotter told him not to read the section that was intended as an apology to Donovan McNabb.

TO's Problems
Here’s an excerpt of the GQ article that likely will cause many more headaches in Philadelphia:
How about the decision not to publicly apologize to McNabb for suggesting in an interview immediately after the Eagles lost the Super Bowl that the quarterback had “got tired” on the field? For a moment, he is silent. Could he actually be on the verge of admitting he made an error?

“Well, I probably should have done...,” he begins, rubbing his hand along the contours of his massive shaved dome. Then he stops himself. “No. No. Listen, I was in the locker room before the press conference, and my team captain, Jeremiah Trotter, read through that apology they wrote for me. He got to the bottom part, the part where it had the stuff about Donovan, and he did this.” Owens snatches a piece of paper from the table and rips off the bottom three inches. “This is the team leader we’re talking about; he told me not to do it.”

Trotter, not surprisingly, was outraged by the accusation. In a text to the Inquirer on Wednesday night, Trotter wrote that Owens’ quotes were a “super lie.” Then, the former Eagles linebacker tweeted the following to Owens, “yo man y u lying to GQ Mag I never told u that call me ASAP!!!!!”

A few minutes later, Owens responded, “@jtrotter_54 lying about what?” Then, Owens sent Trotter a direct message with his contact information, so I assume the trail on that aspect of this story has run cold.

But Owens also had this to say in the GQ article, “To say I regret anything would be a slap in my grandmother’s face. Are there some things I might do differently now? Sure.”

Apologizing to McNabb apparently is not one of them. At the end of the excerpt, though, Owens got it exactly right. “I am not,” he says, “a tactful person.”

No, but once again, Owens is officially a professional football player. And he has all bunch of new teammates to whom he can be tactless.

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Posted on: January 4, 2012 5:44 pm
 

Judge to T.O.: Your NFL career is over

By Josh Katzowitz

Terrell Owens probably doesn’t need the judicial system to tell him that his NFL career is over -- the speculation that he is seriously considering signing a deal with something called the IFL is a pretty good indication about his future prospects -- but a Los Angeles Superior Court judge did so anyway.

TO's Problems
With Owens in court Wednesday to try to lower his child-support payments, because he’s not making enough money, judge Mark Mariani was rather harsh honest with Owens about his potential to make big money again.

"His NFL career seems to be over. I mean no disrespect,” said Mariani, according to TMZ, which then led Owens apparently to nod his head in acknowledgment.

Owens and his lawyer were in court to try to lower payment on two of his four paternity cases, and while the judge didn’t immediately rule, he did try to encourage Owens by saying he could be inspired by Kurt Warner’s rise from the Arena Football League to the NFL.

At least people have heard of the AFL. Unlike, say, the IFL.

All of which must have lead Owens to wonder: "When the hell is the next season of the T.O. Show starting?"

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Posted on: December 30, 2011 12:12 am
 

Terrell Owens to join the IFL's Allen Wranglers?

OwensBy Josh Katzowitz

Just how low is Terrell Owens willing to go in order to play pro football? Pretty damn low, apparently.

According to the official team website, Owens is close to signing a deal to play with the Allen Wranglers of the Indoor Football League*.

*Whatever the hell that is.

As you should know, Owens hasn’t played since he led the Bengals in receiving in 2010, but he’s remained active (you know, recovering from an ACL tear, getting an arrest warrant issued for supposedly failing to pay child support, having various other money problems, NOT trying to commit suicide, and NOT having NFL teams call).

TO's Problems
But Owens apparently is still jonesing to play football, and he’s willing to play in the very minor leagues in order to possibly pique the interest of an NFL team. Either that, or his money problems are very bad indeed.

Players earn $225 per game in the IFL, and they get a bonus for winning. But Allen** says Owens could earn a compensation package between $250,000-$500,000 (!) if he elects to play.

**Major points to you if you knew where the Wranglers are located. I had to look it up, and the answer is Allen, Texas, not too far north of Dallas.

The Wranglers season begins in February, so if Owens actually signs the deal, it’ll have to be relatively soon.

"I'm sure Cowboys fans and all football fans in the area would love to T.O. back." Wranglers coach Patrick Pimmel said. "Terrell would be a great addition to our organization and I hope we can make this happen."

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com