Tag:Andre Reed
Posted on: February 15, 2012 2:24 pm
 

Cris Carter: Modern-day WRs are 'not appreciated'

Cris Carter believes his numbers are good enough to get into the Hall of Fame. (US Presswire)
By Josh Katzowitz

Cris Carter might disagree with my assessment of how the Hall of Fame selection process should mostly maintain its status quo, but we agree on one aspect of the current state of voters --they’re having a tough time figuring out what to do with the wide receivers.

For the second straight year, the upcoming induction class won’t feature a receiver, even though Tim Brown, Andre Reed and Carter are all legitimate candidates. The problem is that the voters are split between Reed and Carter, and with an 80 percent vote needed to get a player in the HOF, neither have managed to siphon enough votes to top that requirement.

“I think the modern day wide receiver … his skill level is not appreciated,” Carter told Hall of Fame receiver Michael Irvin on WQAM radio in Miami (via sportsradiointerviews.com).” It’s not just about the numbers. It’s the ability to catch the football and put your talent on display. That being in the 1980s and 90s and you know I played in three different decades, so Mike people like yourself … people like Joe Montana, people have said things to me… when you all say something to me it really means a lot more. I can’t do no more. I appreciate what you guys are saying and doing everything, but I pleaded my case those 16 years I played in this league.”

Carter -- who had 1,101 catches, 13,899 yards, and 130 touchdowns during his career -- has better numbers than Tim Brown (Carter has less yards receiving but 30 more touchdowns) and Andre Reed. But as Carter says, it’s not just about statistics.

So, how good can he feel about his chances for the Hall now that he’s been rejected for the past five years?

“I felt good my first year,” Carter said. “I mean, I am the only person alive that’s eligible for the Hall of Fame that has 130 touchdowns that is not in it, so when you have a stat like that ... You got more touchdowns than Jim Brown and Walter Payton like…I mean I am not campaigning for the Hall of Fame, so for me the list doesn’t change every year. My numbers ain’t going to change. It’s just too much productivity over the time…like I have no argument Mike. I really don’t.”

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Posted on: January 7, 2012 2:00 pm
Edited on: January 7, 2012 2:01 pm
 

2012 Hall of Fame finalists announced

Hall of Fame (US Presswire)By Josh Katzowitz

The Pro Football Hall of Fame has announced the finalists (15 modern-day players and two senior players) for the 2012 induction class, and among them are Bill Parcells, Jerome Bettis and Cris Carter.

The selection committee, made up of 44 NFL writers from each NFL market, will meet Feb. 4 in Indianapolis to whittle down the list to the inductees. The new Hall of Famers will be announced that day at 5:30 p.m. ET.

Here is the complete list:

Jerome Bettis (RB) 1993-95 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1996-2005 Pittsburgh Steelers

Tim Brown (WR/KR) 1988-2003 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, 2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Jack Butler (CB) 1951-59 Pittsburgh Steelers

Cris Carter (WR) 1987-89 Philadelphia Eagles, 1990-2001 Minnesota Vikings, 2002 Miami Dolphins

Dermontti Dawson (C) 1988-2000 Pittsburgh Steelers

Edward DeBartolo, Jr. (Owner) 1977-2000 San Francisco 49ers

Chris Doleman (DE, LB) 1985-1993, 1999 Minnesota Vikings, 1994-95 Atlanta Falcons, 1996-98 San Francisco 49ers

Kevin Greene (DE, LB) 1985-1992 Los Angeles Rams, 1993-95 Pittsburgh Steelers, 1996, 1998-99 Carolina Panthers, 1997 San Francisco 49ers

Charles Haley (LB, DE) 1986-1991, 1999 San Francisco 49ers, 1992-96 Dallas Cowboys

Cortez Kennedy (DT) 1990-2000 Seattle Seahawks

Curtis Martin (RB) 1995-97 New England Patriots, 1998-2005 New York Jets

Bill Parcells (Coach) 1983-1990 New York Giants, 1993-96 New England Patriots, 1997-99 New York Jets, 2003-06 Dallas Cowboys

Andre Reed (WR) 1985-1999 Buffalo Bills, 2000 Washington Redskins

Willie Roaf (OT) 1993-2001 New Orleans Saints, 2002-05 Kansas City Chiefs

Will Shields (G) 1993-2006 Kansas City Chiefs

Dick Stanfel (G) 1952-55 Detroit Lions, 1956-58 Washington Redskins

Aeneas Williams (CB, S) 1991-2000 Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, 2001-04 St. Louis Rams

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Posted on: February 8, 2011 2:07 pm
 

HOF voters spent a long time on Deion

Sanders Posted by Josh Katzowitz

In an interesting nugget in the middle of his column today, NFL.com’s Vic Carucci wrote about how the Hall of Fame voters discussed and debated Deion Sanders’ candidacy and whether WR Andre Reed ever will be inducted.

The selection meeting lasted almost a full day’s work (7 ½ hours), and much of that time was taken up by the Sanders discussion. Which was a tad shocking.

Here’s an explanation on what happened:

The biggest surprise is that Deion Sanders wound up being the topic of one of the longest conversations. He was, by far, the one player who should have been viewed as an automatic first-ballot choice. The NFL has never had a better cover cornerback or returner, for that matter.

The three wide receivers on the list – Andre Reed, Cris Carter and Tim Brown – also took up a significant chunk of the meeting. Unfortunately, none got in. Reed did make it to the final 10 for the second year in a row, but I honestly don't know what can ultimately get him over the hump.

My sense is that Reed, Carter and Brown simply are facing too much opposition from Hall voters who simply don't believe that receivers in the era the three played are deserving because their great statistics were achieved after NFL rules were altered to allow teams to more easily produce passing yards and, therefore, points.


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Posted on: February 5, 2011 7:38 pm
Edited on: February 5, 2011 7:46 pm
 

What worked against those who didn't make HOF cut

Posted by Andy Benoit
C. Martin (US Presswire)
Every year the Hall of Fame announcement leaves a handful of elite all-time players on the outside looking in. This was especially true this season. Michael Wilbon of ESPN wrote beforehand that all 15 HOF finalists were worthy of enshrinement. Whether you agree with the extremism of Wilbon’s position or not, we can all agree that this was an especially competitive HOF class.

But the key problem for those who did not get in this year was not the fact that there was a thick crop of very deserving finalists (though that was certainly a factor), the problem was the amount of position overlap.

There were four pass catchers up for consideration, four defensive linemen and three running backs. You have to assume players at the same position were pitted firmly against each other at some point during the voters’ seven-and-a-half-hour debate. The principle of split votes naturally comes into play.

Plus, normally the Hall of Fame debate involves position vs. position discussions. (Example: do we prioritize a wide receiver over a linebacker?) That issue will always be relevant; this year, voters had to first figure out who was representing the position. Say a wide receiver is deemed more important than a linebacker. OK…now, is a second wide receiver who was almost as great as the first wide receiver more important than a linebacker? If that second wide receiver had been compared to that same linebacker, but the first wide receiver had never entered the discussion, the second wide receiver would look a lot better. It’s just simple subconscious behavior.

This issue of position overlap likely worked against Curtis Martin, Jerome Bettis, Cris Carter, Tim Brown, Andre Reed, Cortez Kennedy, Charles Haley and Chris Doleman in the voters’ debates.

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Posted on: December 2, 2010 9:30 am
 

Cris Carter is the key to many WRs' HOF chances

Posted by Andy Benoit

The list of 26 semifinalists for the Pro Football Hall of Fame 2011 class was recently announced. The most important name on that list? Cris Carter. C. Carter (US Presswire)

Wide receiver has become one of the toughest positions for voters to gauge. The NFL has evolved so markedly into a passing league that the receiving statistics from one era to another are almost impossible to evaluate. The same problem applies to quarterbacks, but quarterbacks are much easier to figure because a.) They’re tied more directly to their team’s success; b.) They touch the ball every play and c.) They stay on your television screen after the ball is snapped. A wide receiver, on the other hand, might make important contributions like lifting a coverage, disguising a route or providing backside run-blocking support, but that action often takes place off screen.

The voters’ decision will be overwhelmingly based on numbers. That’s what makes Carter, the longtime Vikings receiver, the key that potentially unlocks the Canton door for a host of wideouts. Carter is third all-time in receptions (1,101), eighth all-time in receiving yards (13,899) and fourth all-time in touchdowns (130). Overall, he was essentially the second best wide receiver of the 1990s. If he doesn’t get in, what hope is there for other prolific wideouts like Tim Brown, Andre Reed or Irving Fryar, Torry Holt, Isaac Bruce or Marvin Harrison? All have similar numbers. (Holt, Bruce and Harrison each have a ring, but receivers aren’t judged by titles the way quarterbacks, running backs and, obviously, head coaches are.)

Carter was passed over by Hall of Fame voters last year, but that could have simply been the Jerry Rice effect. This year could be Carter’s best shot at getting in. Of the 25 other semifinalists, only Deion Sanders and likely Marshall Faulk are surefire Yes’.

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Posted on: December 1, 2010 12:19 am
 

Top Ten With a Twist: Not yet HOFers

Fireworks fly during the 2010 Pro Football HOF induction ceremony (US Presswire).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

The Pro Football Hall of Fame this past Sunday released the names of the 26 semifinalists that could be inducted into the HOF for 2011. Most of the names you know. You’ve watched them play. You’ve watched them win. You’ve watched them etch out fantastic careers.

Last year, you knew guys like Jerry Rice and Emmitt Smith were going to make their way into the HOF in their first years of eligibility. These players were some of the best of all time. It was no contest.

But each year, there are certain players or coaches or executives that are left out who deserve to enter the hallowed halls of the … well … Hall. This Top Ten With a Twist isn’t about the players you know who full well will be inducted into next year’s induction class, minus Prime Time. These are the guys who might not, but who probably should be.

10. George Young, executive: I wonder if Young’s enshrinement has been held off because his skills had declined noticeably late in his career (ie. when free agency was introduced to the game in the early 1990s). But there’s no denying that Young was the NFL executive of the year five times and the teams he worked for won three conference titles and one Super Bowl title. For an executive, he was pretty damn important.

9. Jerry Kramer, OG, Packers (1958-68): While he was a very good player in his day – as the three Pro Bowls, five All-Pro selections and the oodles of championships attest – he did the world a favor when he wrote Instant Replay in 1967, giving fans an inside look at what occurs during an NFL season and at coach Vince Lombardi. No, it’s no Ball Four by Jim Bouton (that guy never could get in baseball’s HOF, by the way), but Kramer’s impact on how the fans view the game is an important piece of the NFL’s history.

8. Steve Tasker, WR/ST, Oilers (1985-86), Bills (1986-97): During his 14-year career, Tasker started a total of 15 games. He never had more than 21 catches in a season, and he caught nine touchdown passes. But the fact he’s perhaps the best special teams player ever to compete in the NFL should give him a path to the HOF. He was a 5-foot-9, 180-pound gunner, and he was fast and lethal. He went to the Pro Bowl seven times, and he was named the MVP of the Pro Bowl in 1993. He didn’t make it to the semifinals this year, but that’s not surprising. Special teamers are not given their just due (see No. 1).

7. Andre Reed, WR, Bills (1985-99), Redskins (2000): Reed has gotten caught up in the WR numbers game. He’s been eligible at the same time as Michael Irvin, Jerry Rice, Tim Brown, Art Monk and Cris Carter, and I can see why it’d be tough to select Reed instead of those kinds of receivers. But you have to remember that Reed ranks ninth in career receptions all time and 11th in receiving yards. At some point, he deserves to be enshrined in Canton. Don’t expect it to happen this year, though.

6. Dermontti Dawson, C, Steelers (1988-2000): Simply put, he’s one of the greatest centers of all time. He made the Pro Bowl seven-straight seasons, and with his athletic ability and his knack for getting out in open space and making key blocks for his running backs, he changed the perception of what a center should be. He’ll probably become a finalist for the second time in as many years. One of these days, he should get the welcoming phone call.

5. Cris Carter, WR, Eagles (1987-89), Vikings (1990-2001), Dolphins (2002): Much like Reed, Carter is overshadowed by other receivers. He finished his career as the No. 2 WR (behind Jerry Rice) in receptions and touchdowns. He’s been passed by Marvin Harrison on the receptions list and by Randy Moss and Terrell Owens on the touchdowns list since he retired, but at some point, Carter should be in. It’s actually a little surprising that he’s not in already.

4. Don Coryell, coach: Yes, he wasn’t the originator of today’s modern offense – that’d be a combination of Sid Gillman, Paul Brown and various others – but his Air Coryell teams in the late 1970s to mid 1980s with the Chargers helped innovate the passing game we still see today. He’s already a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. Now, it’s time for him to join Gillman as the only two coaches to be enshrined in the college and the pro Halls of Fame.

3. Deion Sanders, CB/PR, Falcons (1989-93), 49ers (1994), Cowboys (1995-99), Redskins (2000), Ravens (2004-05) : The reasons why are obvious. Just look at the video below. This is his first year eligible, and there’s little chance he won’t make it in immediately.



2. Ed Sabol, contributor: Enjoy watching NFL Films productions? You like watching the behind-the-scenes spots of the players woofing at each other on the sidelines and your favorite coach’s pregame and postgame speeches? If yes, you can thank Sabol, who helped found NFL Films in the mid-1960s. How differently would we view – and think about – the NFL if Sabol hadn’t been such a visionay? That’s unanswerable of course, but the fact NFL Films plays a big role in an NFL’s viewing experience makes Sabol HOF worthy.

1. Ray Guy, P, Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders (1973-86): Simply put, Guy is the greatest punter in the history of the game. But there are no kickers enshrined in the HOF. That must mean they’re less important than anybody else, right? Well, we all know that’s not true. It’s time to get Guy into the Hall. He deserves it.

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Posted on: November 28, 2010 12:54 pm
 

Pro Football HOF semifinalists released

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Here’s the list of the 26 official Hall of Fame semifinalists.

Jerome Bettis, RB – 1993-95 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1996-2005 Pittsburgh Steelers

Tim Brown, WR/KR – 1988-2003 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, 2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Cris Carter, WR – 1987-89 Philadelphia Eagles, 1990-2001 Minnesota Vikings, 2002 Miami Dolphins

Don Coryell, Coach – 1973-77 St. Louis Cardinals, 1978-1986 San Diego Chargers

Roger Craig, RB – 1983-1990 San Francisco 49ers, 1991 Los Angeles Raiders, 1992-93 Minnesota Vikings

Terrell Davis, RB – 1995-2001 Denver Broncos Dermontti Dawson, C – 1988-2000 Pittsburgh Steelers

Edward DeBartolo, Jr., Owner – 1979-1997 San Francisco 49ers

Richard Dent, DE – 1983-1993, 1995 Chicago Bears, 1994 San Francisco 49ers, 1996 Indianapolis Colts, 1997 Philadelphia Eagles

Chris Doleman, DE/LB – 1985-1993, 1999 Minnesota Vikings, 1994-95 Atlanta Falcons, 1996-98 San Francisco 49ers

Marshall Faulk, RB – 1994-98 Indianapolis Colts, 1999-2005 St. Louis Rams

Kevin Greene, LB/DE – 1985-1992 Los Angeles Rams, 1993-95 Pittsburgh Steelers, 1996, 1998-99 Carolina Panthers, 1997 San Francisco 49ers

Ray Guy, P – 1973-1986 Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders

Charles Haley, DE/LB – 1986-1991, 1999 San Francisco 49ers, 1992-96 Dallas Cowboys Lester Hayes, CB – 1977-1986 Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders

Cortez Kennedy, DT – 1990-2000 Seattle Seahawks

Curtis Martin, RB – 1995-97 New England Patriots, 1998-2005 New York Jets Art Modell, Owner – 1961-1995 Cleveland Browns, 1996-2003 Baltimore Ravens

Andre Reed, WR – 1985-1999 Buffalo Bills, 2000 Washington Redskins

Willie Roaf, T – 1993-2001 New Orleans Saints, 2002-05 Kansas City Chiefs

Ed Sabol, Contributor – 1964-1995 NFL Films

Deion Sanders, CB/KR/PR – 1989-1993 Atlanta Falcons, 1994 San Francisco 49ers, 1995-99 Dallas Cowboys, 2000 Washington Redskins, 2004-05 Baltimore Ravens

Shannon Sharpe, TE – 1990-99, 2002-03 Denver Broncos, 2000-01 Baltimore Ravens

Paul Tagliabue, Commissioner – 1989-2006 National Football League

Aeneas Williams, CB/S – 1991-2000 Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, 2001-04 St. Louis Rams

George Young, Contributor – 1968-1974 Baltimore Colts, 1975-78 Miami Dolphins, 1979-1997 New York Giants, 1998-2001 National Football League

A couple notes:

- The five first-year eligible players are Bettis, Faulk, Martin, Roaf and Sanders.

- This is the first time DeBartolo and Sabol have made it to the semifinals.

- Usually, there are 25 semifinalists, but there was a tie for the final spot. So, 26 it is.

- The list will be whittled to 15 finalists and will be announced next January.

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