Play Fantasy Use your Fantasy skills to win Cash Prizes. Join or start a league today. Play Now
 
Tag:Bobbie Williams
Posted on: September 3, 2011 4:21 pm
Edited on: September 3, 2011 6:58 pm
 

Bobbie Williams suspended four games

B. Williams has been suspended four games (US Presswire).Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Bengals guard Bobbie Williams has been suspended for the first four games of the season for violating the NFL policy on performance enhancing substances, the team announced today.

Williams’ absence will leave a big hole on the right side of the Bengals offensive line. His listed backup Otis Hudson was a fifth-round pick in 2010 who doesn’t have experience, and the backup left guard, Max Jean-Gilles, was one of the team’s cuts today. Rapid Reporter Paul Dehner writes this would be a good opportunity for rookie Clint Boling to take a spot in the starting lineup.

“We anticipated this would occur," coach Marvin Lewis told the media, via the Cincinnati Enquirer. "It is nothing that has come as a surprise from our end and it is something we have prepared for.”

You’ll recall that I ranked Williams as a top-five guard before last season, but after 12 years in the league, it’s clear the 34-year-old Williams has begun to slow a bit.

And this four-game suspension won’t help his conditioning nor his top-notch reputation.

In other suspension news, Titans fullback Ahmard Hall has been suspended for four games for violating the league's policy on performance enhancing substances. In response, the Titans have acquired fullback Quinn Johnson from Green Bay for an undisclosed draft pick to make up for Hall's absence.

UPDATED (6:56 p.m. ET): Williams' agent, Tony Agnone, was quick to defend his client.

“The program has run amuck,” Agnone told Bengals.com. “It was designed to keep guys from having a competitive edge. It was about taking steroids and now it has gotten far away from it.”

Agnone said Williams did not take steroids or recreational drugs. But he had other reason to be upset.

“First of all, Bobbie and I found out from you and not the league,” Agnone said. “Look at Bobbie. He has not changed one iota since he’s been in the league.”

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: April 19, 2011 2:12 pm
Edited on: April 19, 2011 11:30 pm
 

Offseason Checkup: Cincinnati Bengals

Posted by Andy Benoit



Eye on Football's playing doctor for every NFL team with our Offseason Check-ups.



After the Bengals fell behind the eight-ball with a devastating turnover-infused loss to the Bucs in Week 5, they went into their bye a lowly 2-3 and searching the depths of their character for answers.

Problem was, the depths of their character included the collective souls of Terrell Owens, Chad Ochocinco, Pacman Jones, Rey Maualuga, Tank Johnson, Cedric Benson, Michael Johnson, Andre Smith, Carlos Dunlap, Frostee Rucker, Jonathan Joseph, Leon Hall and whatever other players on the roster who, at one point or another, have raised the red character flag.

None of these guys were individually heinous in 2010 (save for Owens), but collectively, they created a staggering void in the leadership department.




Offensive scheme

Bob Bratkowski is out as offensive coordinator, and deservedly so. In terms of complexity and sophistication, the Bengals’ system in 2010 was comparable to that of a really sophisticated Pop Warner team’s.

The receivers’ route combinations rarely worked off one another, making them easy to defend. The play-action game was non-existent, which was fitting because the run game was an afterthought.

Which brings us to the change: more power runs under new coordinator Jay Gruden. Expect Cedric Benson to re-sign and get about 25 carries a game. Not only is he best suited to be a bell cow, but the Bengals powerful but heavy-footed offensive line is best suited to play downhill, rather than in the frequent drop steps of pass protection.




1. Quarterback
Carson Palmer insists he’s retiring if the team doesn’t trade him. Owner Mike Brown may be great at playing hardball, but it would take a hardhead to keep Palmer around at this point. Besides, Palmer’s skills have declined (though not as much as you’d probably guess) and he clearly doesn’t trust his offensive line or receivers.

2. Pass Rusher
This need is almost as glaring as the potential need at quarterback. Antwan Odom has not been the same since injuring his Achilles. Robert Geathers was never the same after blowing out his knee. (Unfortunately for the front office, both players were inked to long-term deals before their injuries.) Athletic ex-Gator Carlos Dunlap earned some high marks as a second-round rookie last season, but equally as prominent were his low marks.

3. Interior Offensive Lineman
Right guard Bobbie Williams is aging. Left guard Nate Livings is the definition of average. Or maybe center Kyle Cook is. Whatever; the Bengals need more athleticism inside up front.




A healthy goal for the Bengals would be to regain respect. Self respect, that is. Individually, the Bengals are more athletically gifted than a lot of teams.

But their athletes have not lived up to potential or played well together. Ushering in a new wave of leadership would plant some positive seeds moving forward.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed
Posted on: July 14, 2010 12:36 pm
 

Position rankings: guards

Josh Katzowitz and Andy Benoit resume their debate, with today’s focus on guards.

Andy Benoit’s top five
J. Evans (US Presswire)
5. Leonard Davis, Cowboys

4. Steve Hutchinson, Vikings

3. Carl Nicks, Saints

2. Kris Dielman, Chargers

1. Jahri Evans, Saints

As you can see, an unsexy list from the unsexiest position in football. Leonard Davis makes it because he knows how to use his 365-pound size. Everyone thinks Steve Hutchinson is a God, but that’s only because most fans don’t know the names of any other guards. Hutchinson was once the best, but at 32, he’s lost half a step (which is half a step less than Alan Faneca). Of course, Hutchinson had plenty of steps to spare. He still offers good mobility, but his strength in a phone booth has declined.

You might read the name “Carl Nicks” and say Who?! The Saints left guard is a monster in the run game, getting to the second level with regularity. The only thing he struggles with is lateral movement as a pass-blocker. Dielman is rock-solid. Evans is an even better run-blocker than Nicks, plus he’s reliable in pass protection.

Josh Katzowitz's top five

5. Bobbie Williams, Bengals

4. Kris Dielman, Chargers

3. Chris Snee, Giants

2. Jahri Evans, Saints

1. Logan Mankins, Patriots

I agree that Evans is one of the best guards around, but I don’t think he’s earned the title of No. 1 quite yet. Yes, he had a heck of a season last year, and he was rewarded with a seven-year, $56-million contract. But he needs to mirror that performance for at least one more year before I can knight him as the top guy.

Mankins has been the most talked-about guard throughout the offseason because of his contract clashes with New England’s front office. The fact he might not play this year has to be worrisome to Patriots fans. Mankins is strong, and he has good quickness and agility. If he’s playing, he’s the best out there. Andy, I’m surprised you didn’t even put Mankins on your list.

Snee has a great initial punch at the line of scrimmage, and when he gets to the next level, he makes linebackers pay. Plus, he’s durable, starting the last 78 games the Giants have played.

Williams has been the rock of a Bengals offensive line that continues to turn over year after year. He’s underrated and has never made a Pro Bowl squad. He’s not going to wow you, but that doesn’t mean he’s not on the top five fringe. He’s just too consistent and solid for me not to put on this list.

Andy’s rebuttal

Top five fringe is different from top five, Josh. More on that in a second.

I like the Snee pick, and I can certainly live with Mankins (though, obviously, I think No. 1 is too high). Both those guys have the unique ability to land square, domineering blocks off of movement. I still think Hutchinson is elite (or borderline elite), and I’m disappointed you didn’t praise my prescience for going with Nicks now, and not after he gets his first Pro Bowl (either this season or next).

Okay, let’s talk about the fringe pick, Williams. You’re a (former) Bengals Rapid Reporter. I’m not suggesting you lack journalistic integrity – not at all – but I’m willing to bet you have a good working relationship with the 11th-year veteran. From afar, Williams seems like he’d be a good guy. He shows great on-field leadership. So, be honest, did Williams help you write your list?

The problem is, as a player, Williams is too close to the fat part of the bell curve. I’m going to break my rule of never publishing raw notes from film study to share some of what I took away from watching Williams these past two years:

Raw notes from ’09 Bengals film:

Williams shows good power and size when he’s able to be the aggressor. If he’s stepping into a block between first and second level, he’ll move guys. But if the action starts from standstill, he may not win.

Raw notes from ’08 Bengals film:

Williams is about the same as always....decent but not great. Moves okay, doesn’t have ideal power but gets in his spots, etc.
These are descriptions of a solid starter, not a top five player.

Josh’s final word

Ha! If Williams and I had written this list, we would have spent all day laughing about your exclusion of Mankins. True, I’ve covered the Bengals for various outlets for the past five seasons, but I’m an objective journalist and I don’t play favorites (hell I haven’t had a favorite NFL team since I was a kid, and it certainly wasn’t the Bengals). There are a few guys on the Bengals squad that are wonderful with whom to deal, but I haven’t put them on any of our lists. Considering this is the 11th top five list we’ve done and Williams is the first Bengals player I’ve put in the spotlight – and probably the only one I’ll include for the rest of our top five series – well, I think those facts speak for themselves.

Truth be told, I thought about Hutchinson, I thought about Nicks and I thought about Faneca (he’s just nowhere near his prime anymore). I knew you’d hate the Williams pick, but in all my extensive research – and the fact I’ve seen him play scores of games the past few years – I’m more than confident in defending the selection. He’s just too good and consistent.


Other positions: Safety | Cornerback | 3-4 Scheme Outside Linebacker | Punter  | Kicker | 4-3 Scheme Outside Linebacker | Inside Linebacker  | Defensive Tackle  | Defensive End | Offensive Tackle  | Center)


--Josh Katzowitz and Andy Benoit


For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter.

 

 

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com