Tag:Clark Hunt
Posted on: January 15, 2012 10:45 am
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What kind of organization do the Chiefs run?

Scott Pioli has been accused of running an administration based on paranoia and secrecy (US Presswire).By Josh Katzowitz

In what has to be one of the most interesting ledes of the day and one of the most fascinating stories of the new year, the Kansas City Star’s Kent Babb describes the level of paranoia and job security fears that have descended upon the Chiefs since general manager Scott Pioli took over the team in 2009.

Paranoia, in fact, runs so rampant that former coach Todd Haley believed that his offices were bugged and that his personal cell phone had been corrupted.

First, the lede:
Todd Haley walked into the public relations office at Chiefs headquarters on a Thursday in early December. Four days before he was fired as the team’s coach, he wanted to talk about what life was like inside this organization. But he didn’t know who else might be listening.

Looking up toward the ceiling, he darted into a back hallway before hesitating. Then he turned around, going back through a door and stopping again. Haley suspected that many rooms at the team facility were bugged so that team administrators could monitor employees’ conversations. Stopping finally in a conference room, Haley said he believed his personal cellphone, a line he used before being hired by the Chiefs in 2009, had been tampered with.

As Babb writes, the team denies any of these covert operations, but what apparently is not in dispute by those who speak anonymously is that intimidation and secrecy are major parts of the current administration’s methods.

“When you’re mentally abused, you eventually lose it, too,” one former longtime Chiefs executive told the paper.

Pioli, HaleyChiefs owner Clark Hunt, though, defended his organization and its hiring of Pioli.

“We needed a culture that pursued excellence,” he said. “One that valued honesty and integrity, one where the employees would be held accountable.”

Haley’s paranoia was probably justified. Back in October, we told you that Pioli was on the verge of firing Haley, even though Haley had led the Chiefs to the AFC West title the season before. Haley temporarily saved his job with a winning streak, but not for long.

Yet, this question also is asked:

Is the current culture all Pioli’s doing, or is he acting on the orders of Hunt? One former VP of sales and marketing, who resigned in October, said, “It’s professional football, and I do think that it can be a bit of a pressure cooker. To attribute that to Scott Pioli is unfair.”

But read Babb’s story. Some of the details in the article are amazing, including Pioli’s demand that team employees who have offices facing the practice field must keep their window shades drawn during team workouts. Amazingly that includes team president Mark Donovan.

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Posted on: January 9, 2012 11:33 am
 

Chiefs name Romeo Crennel next head coach

Romeo Crennel is Kansas City's next Chief. (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

The expected and the rumored is now official: Romeo Crennel is the next head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs, the team announced on Monday morning.

"We are very excited to name Romeo the new head coach of the Chiefs,” Chiefs Chairman and CEO Clark Hunt said in a statement released by the team. "In 30 years as a coach in the National Football League, Romeo has established an outstanding track record of success, and we believe his experience and proven ability make him the best person to help us reach our goal of consistently competing for championships."

Crennel seemed like a lock to become the Chiefs head coach after a 2-1 stretch to close out 2011 and a strong defensive effort against some high-caliber offenses like the Packers, Patriots and Steelers in the final eight weeks of the season.

"I have a deep appreciation for the vision that Clark Hunt has and his commitment to building a championship-caliber team," Crennel said. “I believe in the types of players that we are trying to win with and the identity we are trying to create. It is a rare opportunity to be a part of an organization like the Kansas City Chiefs with its storied history and passionate fans and I am eager to get to work and bring this franchise and our fans the success they deserve."

Crennel coached for four years with the Browns, posting a 24-40 record in that time. The Chiefs were reportedly set to interview former Jags coach Jack Del Rio, but the list of potential candidates dried up quickly, with Jeff Fisher honing in on Miami and St. Louis, and Josh McDaniels heading back to New England.

That doesn't make Crennel the leftovers by any means; he was always the favorite to get the gig after the way the Chiefs closed out the season. It just simplified the process for Hunt and general manager Scott Pioli.

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Posted on: September 30, 2011 11:52 pm
 

Allen still feels slighted by his time in KC

AllenPosted by Josh Katzowitz

When Vikings defensive end Jared Allen faces off against the Chiefs in Kansas City this Sunday, he won’t have great memories of his departure from there the last time.

That’s because he started his career with the Chiefs, who drafted him 2004 but then traded him to Minnesota in 2008 for the draft picks they eventually would use to select Branden Albert, Jamaal Charles and DaJuan Morgan.

At the time, Allen was coming off his career-high 15 ½ -sack season, but he and then-general manager Carl Peterson couldn’t come to an agreement on a new contract. So, Allen made it clear that he wanted out, and he got what he wanted.

But Allen is obviously still fueled by the end of his tenure in Kansas City, and he lashed out at Peterson, who’s no longer in pro football, this week when discussing it.

After he was asked why he wanted to leave Kansas City, Allen said (via the Kansas City Star), “His name was Carl Peterson. You can write that in caps. Obviously I guess I had a problem with (owner) Clark (Hunt), too, because he chose Carl over me.”

The main problem was that Allen feels like Peterson lied to him. And apparently it still stings.

“When everything went down there,” Allen said, “I didn’t appreciate being lied to. I was told I’d be getting a (contract) extension and everything and the way things played out…

“My biggest thing was, ‘Listen, I never lied to you guys. I show up and I bust my tail for you. Please don’t lie to me.’ After so many times of hearing they’re going to take care of you and they don’t and hearing the words Carl had to say about me, it’s tough to give it your all for somebody like that.”

CBSSports.com sent Peterson an e-mail requesting comment, but the message was not returned. Instead, we’re left to record what former Chiefs coach Herm Edwards said.

“You never like to trade good players, especially guys that can rush the quarterback,” Edwards told the paper. “He’s a unique player. But there are times where you’re forced to do it. In the situation we were in, I don’t think we had any possibility of signing the guy. He felt like he wanted to move on and we were trying to rebuild. We needed players. It worked out well for Minnesota. It worked out for the Chiefs. They got some more players.”

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Posted on: July 21, 2011 9:40 pm
Edited on: July 21, 2011 10:40 pm
 

Atmosphere anything but festive at owners meeting

Goodell, SmithPosted by Josh Katzowitz

ATLANTA -- After the vote was tallied and a new CBA had been passed by the owners, a cheer went up inside the Marriott ballroom where the owners had spent the last nine hours of their day. After months of negotiating and another long day of discussing, arguing and compromising, the owners let off a little bit of steam that could be heard outside in the hallway.

A few minutes later, Roger Goodell, flanked by NFL attorney Jeff Pash, Carolina’s Jerry Richardson, Kansas City’s Clark Hunt, New York Giants’ John Mara and Pittsburgh’s Art Rooney, entered the press conference room.

The mood, though, wasn’t quite as cheery.

There were no balloons -- or champagne corks -- popping. It didn’t feel like a day of celebration. It didn’t feel like things would be all right and that life would be good again. It felt a little apprehensive.

And for good reason. The NFLPA hasn’t signed off on the new CBA, and at first glance, the NFLPA doesn’t seem altogether happy with the new document. We might continue to find out just how unhappy the players actually are.

So, yeah, there weren’t a ton of smiles from the Gang of Six who stood behind the podium in front of the assembled media. If they thought this labor negotiation was completely finished, they might not be (probably aren’t) correct.

“They have a real incentive (to ratify)," Richardson said after the presser. "I can’t imagine why they’ve negotiated so hard, and they have received so many things they thought were important, I can’t imagine why they would not. Of course, there is (apprehension). But we’ve done what we’re supposed to do. We’ve done our half. It’s their choice now.”

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Those first two sentences from Richardson was a point made repeatedly Thursday. How, the owners reasoned, could the players NOT accept this deal?

“There are very substantial incentives to do so and to ratify and conclude the agreement,” Pash said. “It is a good agreement. It is a fair agreement. It is an agreement that will be very positive for players in many, many ways. … We would expect that those incentives would be responded to.

“I can’t imagine DeMaurice Smith is electing to pay all of those hours for his attorneys to negotiate an agreement that he and his members then decide not to ratify.”

Well, it looks like the decision to ratify might be rejected. If that occurs, we have another, perhaps larger set of problems that could jeopardize part -- or all -- of the 2011 season. Then, money is lost, paychecks aren’t cashed, fans aren’t happy.

Maybe, on Thursday after the owners voted 31-0 to pass the agreement, they knew the fight wasn’t over, and that’s why there were no fist pumps or fist bumps on display. Maybe, as Goodell said, the owners were simply exhausted from the negotiations.

Or maybe they knew something the players and the rest of us didn’t. The thing we’re only beginning to find out. That the hard part isn’t over yet; that there really was no reason to celebrate at all.

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Posted on: July 1, 2011 1:58 am
 

NFL, NFLPA meet for more than 15 hours

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

The NFL and the NFLPA finally have emerged from their 15 1/2-hour meeting, and they will return at 9 a.m. Friday morning to continue discussions, according to reports from NFL.com’s Albert Breer. The mega-bargaining session began at 10 a.m. ET Thursday and continued until about 1:30 a.m. Friday

There’s obviously no new CBA, but after such a long day of meeting face to face, you have to wonder if that announcement is coming relatively soon -- like, say, within the next week or so.

Though late Thursday afternoon, there was plenty of pessimism emanating from a number of reports after the NFLPA held a conference call for some of its members, the fact that the two sides negotiated for another eight hours after that has got to be a positive step.

Plus, with the league moving closer to a deadline when a deal would have to be done in order to begin training camps on time, both sides seem a little more energized to get something accomplished.

According to the AP, among those involved in the talks today included: U.S. Magistrate Judge Arthur Boylan, Giants owner John Mara, Chiefs owner Clark Hunt, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, Patriots owner Robert Kraft and, for the players, Colts C Jeff Saturday, Chiefs G Brian Waters and Ravens CB Domonique Foxworth.

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Posted on: June 8, 2011 3:16 pm
Edited on: June 8, 2011 3:48 pm
 

NFL, NFLPA confirm secret talks

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

In case you needed confirmation that the NFL and the NFLPA are engaged in secret meetings this week – although you SHOULDN’T since CBSSports.com’s own Mike Freeman reported it Tuesday night – the two sides have released a statement.

"NFL owners and players have engaged in further confidential discussions before Chief Magistrate Judge Boylan this week,” the statement reads.

The two sides are meeting somewhere in New York – some reports have pinpointed the meetings to Long Island – and according to NFL.com, the NFLPA is represented by DeMaurice Smith, Kevin Mawae, Jeff Saturday, Mike Vrabel, Tony Richardson and Domonique Foxworth.

Meanwhile, the NFL is represented by commissioner Roger Goodell, New York Giants owner John Mara, Kansas City’s Clark Hunt, New England’s Robert Kraft, Carolina’s Jerry Richardson and San Diego’s Dean Spanos.

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Posted on: April 19, 2011 9:46 am
 

Mediation resumes Tuesday with new faces

Posted by Will Brinson

Mediation in the Brady v. NFL matter resumes Tuesday, and there will be some changes in the people present for the two parties.

For starters, NFLPA Executive Director DeMaurice Smith won't be present at the mediation, due to "a family medical emergency," per Mark Maske of the Washington Post.

Meanwhile, Albert Breer of the NFL Network reports that the NFL's negotiating team will feature Commissioner Roger Goodell, lead counsel Jeff Pash, Panthers owner Jerry Richardson, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, Broncos owner Pat Bowlen, and Packers CEO Mark Murphy.

Out of the owners present, only Richardson -- considered perhaps the lead negotiator for the owners -- is a holdover from last week. And it's interesting that the group heading into the second week of court-ordered mediation is in stark contrast to the group (Bob Kraft of the Pats, Clark Hunt of the Chiefs and Art Rooney of the Steelers) that was in Minnesota last week.

Jones, as you'll recall, allegedly had a bit of a confrontation with the players when the two sides mediated before George Cohen in Washington, D.C. That's not to say this will end poorly, because however the two sides act over the course of the mediation ends up reflecting on their position to Judge Susan Nelson.

And maybe it's a good thing that a new group of owners gets to see the proceedings and gauge the NFLPA's position at this point in time through an in-person experience.

Smith's absence is regrettable, certainly, but a family illness is one of the things that get you excused from almost any mediation. It probably also means that we're unlikely to see any settlement on Tuesday.

But that was likely to be the case anyway -- as our own Mike Freeman wrote recently, this second round of mediation might theoretically hold more water because it's court-ordered, but it's just about as likely to produce a happy ending to this labor dispute as the UFL is to produce football that will satisfy America come the fall.

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Posted on: April 14, 2011 7:45 pm
Edited on: April 14, 2011 9:23 pm
 

NFL, NFLPA will continue mediation Friday

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

After nearly 10 hours of negotiations today, the mediation session between the NFL and the NFLPA in the presence of U.S. Magistrate Judge Arthur Boylan has ended. And, as we suspected, not many people are saying much of anything.

Although NFL lead negotiator Jeff Pash said the two sides would return to the courthouse in Minneapolis on Friday, commissioner Roger Goodell said, “We pledged confidentiality.”

As NFL.com's Albert Breer wrote earlier this evening, “I've been told talks upstairs have been ‘tough’ and there's lots of ‘fence-mending’ to be done.”

Still, it sounds like something productive occured.

"We had a full day. It was constructive to get together," said Pash, who was joined by Panthers owner Jerry Richardson, Chiefs owner Clark Hunt, Steelers owner Art Rooney and Patriots owner Robert Kraft. "The chief magistrate judge is working very hard, and I give him a lot of credit for really trying to move the parties toward a solution."

OK, that sounds fine. But how long will this mediation attempt last? Until (fingers crossed!) there’s a resolution?

 "The court has indicated it wants to continue with everyone talking as long as it makes sense," said Michael Hausfeld, one of the attorneys for the players.

Hmm, that doesn’t really tell us much, does it?

Actually, the fact that NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith (who was joined by Vikings LB Ben Leber, Chiefs LB Mike Vrabel and Hall of Fame DE Carl Eller) and Goodell – who had to step away from part of the bargaining session to join in on a conference call scheduled with 5,300 Browns fans – attended the mediation is a pretty good sign.

"I can tell you that it's a positive step when the parties are talking," Goodell told the Browns fans. "We saw the March 11 proposal as responsive to issues raised by the players and there are many attractive elements in it. ... Our entire focus is on getting a deal done."

Though these sessions were mandated by Judge Susan Nelson – who will eventually rule on the Brady v NFL case – it’s obviously positive that the two sides, once again, are meeting. And hope for an agreement of any sort between the two sides continues.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com