Tag:Darrius Heyward-Bey
Posted on: November 20, 2011 6:09 pm
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Heyward-Bey has feeling, should travel home

D. Heyward-Bey had feeling after this hit (AP).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Early in the fourth quarter of the Raiders-Vikings game, Darrius Heyward-Bey caught a pass across the middle of the field, and while Cedric Griffin tackled him, E.J. Henderson’s knee caught Heyward-Bey in the head and knocked off his helmet.

While the play looked serious and awfully scary, Raiders coach Hue Jackson said Heyward-Bey had full use of extremities. Jackson also said he was optimistic that Heyward-Bey would travel home with his teammates tonight.

Heyward-Bey led the team with four catches for 43 yards in Oakland's win, and as he was stretchered off the field, his raised his left hand to the sky, much to the relief of everybody watching.

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Posted on: October 23, 2011 6:15 pm
Edited on: October 23, 2011 8:27 pm
 

Boller benched; Carson Palmer inserted

C. Palmer made his Oakland debut (US Presswire).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Down two touchdowns, the Raiders decided they should give starting quarterback Kyle Boller one last chance to make an impression after halftime. But following a three-and-out that lasted less than a minute into the third quarter, Hue Jackson made his move.

After Chiefs cornerback Javier Arenas scored a rushing touchdown to gave the Chiefs a 21-point lead, Jackson inserted newly-acquired Carson Palmer to see if he could lift the team (we already told you that Jackson plans to start Palmer in two weeks).

Boller went 7 for 14 for 61 yards and three interceptions, so it was doubtful that Palmer would perform much worse. And on the first play, he nailed Darrius Heyward-Bey for an 18-yard gain, and he had to shake off a personal foul penalty on Chiefs linebacker Tamba Hali after Hali went at his knees. It was certainly a positive first play on his first series.

He handed off a couple times, but on his other two passing attempts, an out route to Heyward-Bey and a screen pass, Palmer looked rusty. Those two passes fell incomplete, and though the Raiders went for it on fourth and eight, a false start penalty forced them to punt.

Still, Palmer, in those few plays, looked better than Boller. And maybe the Raiders can have some hope for the first time since Jason Campbell’s injury.

UPDATED 8:24 p.m. ET: It did not go well for Palmer, who threw three interceptions on the day.



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Posted on: October 19, 2011 3:05 pm
 

Film Room: Raiders vs. Chiefs preview

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit



Imagine you get sick. You call your girlfriend to tell her that you’re sorry but you’re not going to be able to go with her to the ski resort this weekend. She says that’s no problem, she’ll just go with one of her friends. But when she scrolls through her contacts, she realizes she doesn’t have any friends nearby who are good skiers.

So, she calls to tell you to get well soon and also that she’s going to the ski resort with that guy her cousin knows from the gym. Oh, and the guy and her are moving in together after the trip but can the two of you still be friends? You can’t help but realize that if you’d never gotten sick, your girlfriend would not have started thinking about someone else.

If you can imagine this, then you can imagine how Jason Campbell is probably feeling right now. Let’s examine Jason Campbell’s Carson Palmer’s 4-2 Raiders as they head into their matchup against a Chiefs club that has won two straight coming off its bye but has been rocked by injuries and turmoil.


[Raiders vs. Chiefs PreGame]

1. The Decision
Forty-three million over four years, along with a first-and either first-or-second-round pick in exchange for a quarterback who became inconsistent after a slew of injuries and failed to manage the oversized personalities infiltrating his locker room and huddle in Cincinnati? That’s a steep price – probably too steep, in fact.

But you can understand the Raiders’ logic in going for a potential franchise quarterback. Like the skiing girlfriend, they’re attracted to strong-armed prototypes and are looking for a ring.

The Raiders knew they couldn’t get that ring with Campbell. Caretaking quarterbacks don’t cut it in today’s NFL. Campbell has always been too methodical in his reads and mechanics. He locks onto receivers, which limits what Hue Jackson can do with his gameplans. Campbell is athletic but seems to forget it whenever defenders flash in his face. In short, he has always been exactly what he’ll be when his collarbone heels: a quality backup.
That said, when a team goes all-in like the Raiders have here, they’d better be set in virtually all areas around the quarterback.

So how set are the rest of the Raiders?

2. Pass offense
It’s difficult to gauge Oakland’s passing attack because it has been tailored to hide Campbell’s limitations. But a safe assumption is that with Palmer aboard (whenever he does play), it will become downfield oriented. Darrius Heyward-Bey, Jacoby Ford and Denarius Moore might be the fastest receiving trio in the league. Also, tight end Kevin Boss is not fast, but he’s effective stretching the seams.

Still, speed isn’t everything. The Raiders wideouts all remain raw. Heyward-Bey’s elevated reception total has been partly a function of facing favorable off-coverage. His hands are improved but still not naturally soft. As for Ford, durability and route running can be hit or miss. And Moore? He has done next to nothing since his breakout game at Buffalo.

Still, we’ve seen that (when healthy) these guys can give the Raiders firepower. And because Darren McFadden and fullback Marcel Reese are such dynamic weapons out of the backfield, Hue Jackson can comfortably sacrifice an extra receiver in the formation in order to employ a sixth offensive lineman.

Doing this makes for a better play-action game (a run-oriented team throwing out of a run formation) and also ameliorates right tackle Khalif Barnes’ weakness in pass protection.

3. Run offense
McFadden has blossomed into a legitimate top-five running back. The difference between now and two years ago is he’s staying healthy and has figured out how to get to the perimeter early in the run. That’s important because being such a stiff-hipped, straight-line runner, McFadden doesn’t have the type of agility and lateral burst needed to elude defenders at the line of scrimmage or second level. But he has uncanny speed and acceleration, which, when turned on full blast, make him hard to tackle cleanly.

The Raiders blockers have helped ignite Oakland’s explosive outside run game. Rookie guard Stefan Wisniewski has good movement skills (particularly in short areas) and center Samson Satele has been getting out in front with much greater consistency.

The Raiders also spend a lot of time in six-offensive linemen sets, with the nimble Khalif Barnes serving essentially as a 325-pound blocking tight end. Factor in Michael Bush’s between-the-tackles power and you have the making of a potent, sustainable rushing attack.

4. Defense
When the Raiders don’t surrender big plays they’re tough to trade blows with for four quarters. The defensive line is enormous and athletic, particularly inside where Richard Seymour (future Hall of Famer?) and Tommy Kelly present thundering power augmented by uncommon initial quickness.
The key to creating big plays against Oakland is isolating their linebackers.

Middle linebacker Rolando McClain plays slow (both mentally and physically) and can be exploited. Aaron Curry has only been in town one week, but if his track record from Seattle means anything, he too can be exploited, mainly in space outside the numbers or when forced to cover receivers horizontally. It’s surprising that Curry was handed Quinton Groves' job right away (Groves had been up and down but was getting more comfortable).

The secondary does indeed miss Nnamdi Asomugha, but any secondary would miss Nnamdi Asomugha. Stanford Routt has been adequate on the left side, and the versatile Michael Huff is having the best season of his career. Anytime a team plays predominant man coverage (like the Raiders do), the defensive backs are vulnerable. A pass-rush can help relieve this. The Raiders have great interior rushers but could stand to use a little more speed on the edges.

5. Kansas City’s chances
The question is whether the Chiefs can find some sort of run game without Jamaal Charles. So far, the answer has been no. Don’t expect that to change Sunday; Oakland’s defensive tackles should feast on Kansas City’s struggling interior line.

In the air, teams have been attacking the Raiders defense with play action and rollouts. Matt Cassel has the mobility and arm to make throws on the move (he did so frequently against the Vikings) but that’s usually by circumstance, not design. This is a shotgun passing offense, with success hinging on whether Dwayne Bowe and Steve Breaston can separate from Stanford Routt and DeMarcus Van Dyke (or Chris Johnson or Chimdi Chekwa, should either return from their hamstring injuries).

On the other side of the ball, Tamba Hali is one of the most disruptive players in all the land. He plays with perfect leverage and physically strong quickness in all cardinal directions. The Raiders don’t have anyone who can block him. Hali can’t do it alone, though, which is why Justin Houston needs to play with more decisiveness (tough to ask of a rookie sometimes). Kansas City’s secondary misses Eric Berry but has two physical corners (Brandon Carr and Brandon Flowers) who can compensate, especially against raw wideouts.

Key matchup to watch: Darren McFadden against Derrick Johnson. Speed on speed.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all Week 7 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: October 13, 2011 11:37 am
 

Keep an Eye On: Week 6's finer points of analysis

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit

Raiders vs. Browns
Keep an eye on: Raiders passing game
The Raiders are a run-first team, no doubt. That shouldn’t change against the Browns.

Cleveland can stop the run well enough, especially if middle linebacker D’Qwell Jackson stays clean from blockers. But at some point, Jason Campbell will have to make a play or two through the air. Expect Darren McFadden to be the primary receiving weapon out of the backfield.

Throws to McFadden have easy, defined reads for Campbell (who often flounders late in his progressions and when his pocket gets too crowded for him to take a full step into his throw) and they should be available given the way Cleveland’s linebackers have struggled in underneath coverage. Most of those struggles have come against athletic tight ends.

The Raiders, however, are more inclined to run tight end Kevin Boss down the seam and swing McFadden underneath. The Browns will likely commit a safety (perhaps T.J. Ward) to tight end coverage and allow Scott Fujita to cover McFadden (expect zone principles since Fujita doesn’t have a prayer at running with McFadden in man coverage).

This isn’t to say Campbell won’t go to his wide receivers. He’s been attacking deep more in October than he did in September. That’s a response to the new speedy duo of Denarius Moore and Darrius Heyward-Bey. Both are raw but potentially lethal. (No. 3 receiver Jacoby Ford is also a burner.) They’re not a potent one-two punch yet, though. Moore’s only big game came against the Bills, when Heyward-Bey was out of the lineup.

We may find out which receiver the Raiders like better this Sunday. Campbell has avoided throwing at top-flight corners this season (he hardly looked to Darrelle Revis’ side in Week 3 and rarely challenged Houston’s Johnathan Joseph in Week 5). Browns second-year sensation Joe Haden is most definitely a top-flight corner (he may have the most natural change-of-direction ability of any defensive player in football).

If Haden returns from his sprained knee, he’ll likely line up on the defensive left side. Whoever Oakland puts on the offensive left side (i.e. away from Haden) figures to be the go-to target. That could tell you what wide receiver pecking order the Raiders prefer.



Ravens vs. Texans
Keep an eye on: Brian Cushing
The third-year pro has been arguably the best inside linebacker in the AFC this season. That’s significant considering how mightily Cushing struggled as the middle linebacker in Houston’s 4-3 scheme last season.

But the inside duties are different in Wade Phillips’ new 3-4. With less field to cover, Cushing has been able to be more of an attacker than a reader-and-reactor. That’s a style best suited for his speed and ferocity.
 
Cushing hunts down outside runs extremely well and shows vigor when tasked with clearing out a lead-blocker. Both are critical traits for containing a Ravens ground game featuring a dynamic B-and C-gap runner like Ray Rice and a fullback like Vontae Leach.

Cushing is also noteworthy because of what he means to Houston’s pass-rush. Against the Raiders last week, Phillips resorted to frequent inside blitzes in an effort to instill panic in Oakland’s pass protectors and command one-on-one matchups for the rushers outside. Cushing continuously stood out for timing his blitzes well and executing them with reckless abandon.

With Mario Williams out, Phillips may feel compelled to be even more aggressive with linebacker blitzes. And he’s certainly seen the Week 4 film of Joe Flacco and the Ravens struggling to sort out many of the Jets’ inside blitzes.

Lions vs. 49ers
Keep an eye on: the tight ends
The 49ers and Lions are very different offenses. The Lions run a modern, semi-spread, aerial attacking offense. The 49ers run a 1980s, compact, ground-pounding offense.

That’s primarily a function of the quarterbacks. Though both are former No. 1 overall picks, Matthew Stafford is gun-slinger while Alex Smith is, comparatively, a spitball shooter. (To be fair, Smith did have a terrific game against the Bucs. He diagnosed coverages well and made a few stick throws.)

Though vastly different, both offenses are built around the same base personnel package: two tight ends. The Lions frequently line up with Tony Scheffler and Brandon Pettigrew while the Niners often feature Vernon Davis and Delanie Walker. The conundrum that two tight end personnel presents for a defense is in deciding what personnel to respond with.

Go with nickel and you risk getting run on (especially when facing the Niners, given that Davis and Walker are both solid run-blockers). Go with a base defense and you risk getting thrown on (especially with the Lions since Scheffler often splits out as a third receiver in the slot).
 
All four tight ends are weapons. For the Lions, Brandon Pettigrew is surprisingly mobile given his 265-pound frame and ’09 knee injury (from which he’s seemingly gained mobility through rehabbing). Scheffler is a swift downfield target.

For the Niners, Vernon Davis is as athletic as they come. No one save for maybe Jermichael Finley is as dangerous down the seams. Delanie Walker is not as good as Bay Area fans think, but he’s versatile in patterns and can block from a standstill position, off of motion or in a lead out of the backfield.

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Posted on: August 5, 2011 12:20 pm
Edited on: August 5, 2011 3:16 pm
 

Raiders sign Boss to replace Miller

Posted by Ryan Wilson

The Seahawks signed Zach Miller away from the Raiders with a five-year, $34 million deal with $17 million in guarantees. To replace their leading receiver from 2010 (and one of the few pass-catching threats not named Darren McFaddenwho is currently on the shelf) Oakland inked former Giants tight end Kevin Boss. ESPN's Adam Schefter reports that the contract is for four years and worth $16 million, about half what Seattle paid for Miller.

Which immediately raises the question: was Miller worth it? Put differently: should the Raiders, who need all the downfield passing help they can get, have made more of an effort to keep Miller in Oakland?

Looking at the raw numbers, Miller had 60 catches for 685 yards and 5 TDs last season. Boss had 35 receptions for 531 yards and also had 5 TDs. According to Football Outsiders' advanced stats, Miller ranked 19th among all NFL tight ends in total value, and 22nd in value per play; Boss was 32nd in both measures.

To add some context, Yahoo.com's Doug Farrar (who's also a Seahawks fan and watches a ton of film) tweets that "Boss and Miller (are) not the same player. Boss: speed for shorter routes, good blocker. Miller: size and speed to stretch seam. Different level."

Boss' blocking acumen will come in handy given that the Raiders like to run the ball, but he won't magically make up for the lost downfield production now that Miller is in Seattle.

But, hey, maybe this is the year Darrius Heyward-Bey finally puts it together.

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Posted on: November 27, 2010 7:54 pm
Edited on: November 27, 2010 7:55 pm
 

Week 12 injury news and analysis, part III

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Panthers at Browns

Both sides have big quarterback questions this week. The Panthers have three of their signal-callers on the injury report – including Tony Pike, probable with a right shoulder, and Brian St. Pierre, probable with a right shoulder – but Jimmy Clausen, who has shaken off the effects of a concussion, is the one who will get the starting nod.

You might think the probable status of RB Jonathan Williams would be good news for Carolina, but you’d be wrong (I’m not saying it’s bad news, but it’s kind of meh news). He’s been extremely ineffective this year, and in his absence, Mike Goodson has been very impressive.

Meanwhile, Cleveland QB Colt McCoy is doubtful with an ankle injury, meaning Jake Delhomme, who hasn’t started a game since the season-opener, will face off against his old team. WR Joshua Cribbs, who broke four of his toes two weeks ago, is questionable. He might be on the active roster, but don’t look for him to get too involved with the offense.

Chiefs at Seahawks


Kansas City would feel much better about its prospects to beat Seattle on the road if WR Dexter McCluster and TE Tony Moeaki – both of whom are questionable – can play. McCluster has missed the past four games with a high ankle sprain, but it seems likely he’ll return this week. Moeaki, coming off a concussion two weeks ago, also should play.

The big question for the Seahawks is whether WR Mike Williams (questionable, foot) will play. All week, Seattle has prepared like he wouldn’t play, and as of Friday, he was still in a walking boot. But he’ll also be a gametime decision, so if Williams can look OK in pregame warmups, there’s a chance he might be out there when the game starts.

Dolphins at Raiders


No matter who’s quarterbacking Miami – and indications are pointing toward Chad Henne – the Dolphins will suffer without standout WR Brandon Marshall, who was downgraded today from doubtful to out with a hamstring. Henne, thought to be lost for the season two short weeks ago, likely will get the start in place of former third-stringer Tyler Thigpen.

For Oakland, TE Zach Miller is questionable but probably will play. As will CB Nnamdi Asomugha, G Robert Gallery and WR Darrius Heyward-Bey – all of whom are listed as probable.

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Posted on: November 20, 2010 3:57 pm
 

Week 11 injury report analysis Part II

Posted by Andy Benoit

Raiders @ Steelers

For Oakland, WR Chaz Schilens is out. That has become as standard as eating lunch after breakfast. Superstar CB Nnamdi Asomugha hopes his speedy recovery from a high ankle sprain will allow him to play. Asomugha participated in parts of practice during the week. The Steelers will have WR Hines Ward back (he missed three quarters with a concussion against New England last week), but the Raiders would probably prefer to put Asomugha on the more explosive Mike Wallace.

Oakland’s passing game might be more limited than usual, as TE Zach Miller (foot) and WR Darrius Heyward-Bey (hamstring) are both questionable. The Steelers vaunted defense is at full strength minus the all-important defensive ends, Aaron Smith (triceps) and Brett Keisel (hamstring).

Browns @ Jaguars

Josh Cribbs is a no-go after dislocating every toe in his right foot except the big one last week against the Jets. That obviously hurts Cleveland’s return game (though rookie Joe Haden is solid running back kickoffs) and it limits the creativity of the already-mundane offense. The offense could be further limited if sensational LG Eric Steinbach (calf) can’t play. He’s questionable – and so is backup Floyd Womack (knee).

Defensively, the Browns could once again be without Shaun Rogers (ankle). They will certainly be without LB Scott Fujita (knee). CB Sheldon Brown is questionable after last week’s shoulder injury. LB Matt Roth got sick and did not practice all week. DE Kenyon Coleman was limited in practice with a knee injury.

Cleveland’s banged-up defense presents the Jaguars with a golden opportunity to get to 6-4 and, remarkably, sneak to the top of the AFC South (that is, if New England beats Indy). The Jags will be near full strength Sunday, as WR Mike Sims-Walker (doubtful, ankle) is the only player listed as anything worse than probable.

Lions @ Cowboys

The Lions listed 17 players on the injury report this week. That’s not good considering they have to play just four days after the conclusion of this game.

The Lions will of course be without QB Matthew Stafford (shoulder). Kicker Jason Hanson (leg) is still out. So is RB Kevin Smith (thumb), which is a problem exacerbated by the fact that Jahvid Best is battling a toe injury (he’ll likely play but at less than 100 percent).

Tony Romo’s injury means we get to see Jon Kitna facing his former team. Somehow this doesn’t quite have the glamour of Favre facing the Packers. Kitna will have his full arsenal of weapons. The only iffy starter for the Cowboys is cornerback Terence Newman (ankle).

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Posted on: October 12, 2010 4:35 pm
Edited on: October 12, 2010 5:37 pm
 

Top Ten With a Twist: Overpaid players

J. Delhomme is making more than $19 million this year. He's probably not worth it (Getty). Posted by Josh Katzowitz

I saw a stunning stat on Twitter as the Browns mucked their way to a loss against the Falcons this past Sunday. It had to do with how much money QB Jake Delhomme is pulling in this year. Naturally, the number is ridiculous, as I’ll detail further in the below paragraphs.

But it gave me the idea for the newest edition of Top Ten With a Twist. Who are the most overpaid players in the game today? By overpaid, I mean the players who are either busts or has-beens or guys who simply found an owner who decided that spending tens of millions of dollars on a problem child was the way to go.

I’m not talking about rookies like Sam Bradford. Of course, the first-round NFL draft picks are overpaid, but at this point, I’m not including them on this list (it’d be an entirely new list altogether). Instead, I’m including guys like Delhomme – either guys who have been around the league for a while who are getting a good payday because they were good at one time, or guys who were supposed to be good but haven’t shown it.

Be forewarned: the salaries we’ll discuss might make you a little nauseous. So, pop a Dramamine or two and let’s go.

10. Eli Manning, QB, Giants: Before last season, you’ll recall, Manning signed a seven-year deal worth $106.9 million that pays him an average of about $15 million from 2009 through 2015, and that doesn’t include his endorsement deals. There’s little doubt that Manning is the most important player on the team, but is he really worth the money? I’m not saying Manning isn’t good, because he is a good quarterback. But he’s not an elite top-five kind of guy, and he’s making elite top-five kind of money. For what it’s worth, he currently makes more than his brother, Peyton (and his oldest brother, Cooper, for that matter).

9. Marvin Austin, DT, Tar Heels: OK, we’re getting a little ahead of ourselves if we’re talking NFL. But look at the damage Austin – well, the recruitment of Austin – has done already and look how much money it’s cost the people around him. Austin apparently accepted gifts and other improper benefits from agents (the NCAA determined it was worth between $10,000-$13,000). As a result, Austin was kicked off the team Monday and UNC teammates Robert Quinn and Greg Little have been made permanently ineligible, the NCAA has brought up academic violations, coach Butch Davis might get fired, the Tar Heels football program has been set back in a major way, and the school in general has taken a hit to its reputation. That’s quite a bit of money Austin indirectly is costing everybody, and as one of my colleague says, “And he hasn’t even played yet!”

8. Joey Porter, LB, Cardinals: Blame the team in this case instead of the player. The team which gave a 33-year-old LB a three-year deal for $17.5 million which could max out at $24.5 million. Porter was coming off a pretty good season in Miami in 2009, where he recorded nine sacks in 14 games. This year, though, has been a rough one. He’s recorded 16 solo tackles, good for 10th on the team, and he’s only recorded one sack through the team’s first five games. No doubt that Porter has had a standout career, but there’s also little doubt that he’s not the player he once was. He’s still making good bank for it, though.

7. Brandon Jacobs, RB, Giants: Perhaps if Jacobs had been signed as a discus hurler, his four-year, $25 million extension that he signed before last season would have made sense. Instead, Jacobs is solely a RB who’s gained 172 yards in the team’s first five games and who’s lost his starting position (for the record, in 2009, his attempts rose from the 2008 season, but his yards gained fell and his touchdowns dropped from 15 to five). Plus, you had the throwing-his-helmet-into-the-crowd incident at the Indianapolis game. The $15 million he was guaranteed doesn’t look so good now.

6. Darrius Heyward-Bey, WR, Raiders: We’re not discussing rookies in this list, but that doesn’t mean we can’t talk about second-year players (or players that are still in college, I suppose). For some reason, the Raiders took him with the seventh pick in the 2009 Draft, and then they blew up the slotting system by awarding him a five-year contract worth $38.25 million ($23.5 million guaranteed). He promptly went out and caught nine passes in 11 games. This year, he’s got 11 catches through five games, so that’s an improvement. Good thing the Raiders took Heyward-Bey instead of, say, Jeremy Maclin.

5. Tyson Jackson, DE, Chiefs: He was the third overall pick of the 2009 Draft, and while he wasn’t great last year – hell, he wasn’t even decent – he wasn’t the worst bust in the history of the Draft. It could be argued that he wasn’t nearly as bad as Glenn Dorsey, the Chiefs 2008 first-round pick who had tallied exactly two sacks in his first two years. But Dorsey is playing better this year, while Jackson – 38 tackles last year but zero sacks – has been out with a sprained MCL. At this point, he’s a big disappointment.

A. Smith still hasn't won a starting job with Cincinnati (Getty). 4. Andre Smith, OL, Bengals: The one thing I’ll always remember about Smith – aside from the whole running-the-40-shirtless-at-his-pro
-day-only-to-be-mocked-unmercifully
thing – is that after he signed his contract for $21 million on HBO’s Hard Knocks, his agent turned to him and said, “Congratulations. You’re a millionaire now.” Yep, that’s pretty much how he’s acted the past two years in Cincinnati. He’s been overweight, and his work ethic has been questioned. He only played in six games last season, starting one, and he still can’t be used as an every-play offensive lineman. Dennis Roland, who’s much less talented than Smith, has been starting ahead of him.

3. Matt Cassel, QB, Chiefs: One good year can get you a big contract, and for proof, look no further than Cassel. In 2008, he led the Patriots to a 11-5 record while completing 63.4 percent of his passes for 3,693 yards, 21 touchdowns and 11 interceptions. After New England QB Tom Brady returned, Cassel signed with the Chiefs for a six-year, $63 million deal with $28 million guaranteed. Not bad for a career backup in the NFL and in college at USC. This year, he’s completed 54.7 percent of his passes for 650 yards (about 162.5 yards per game), four TDs and three INTs. That’s not much production for a guy being paid a lot of money.

2. Albert Haynesworth, NT, Redskins: You thought I was going to put Haynesworth No. 1, didn’t you? While we’ve spent so much time on Haynesworth and the $100 million contract and the tens of millions of dollars of guaranteed money, he’s begun to play better lately (he sat out this past week, though, after the death of his brother). Surely, he’s not worth the money, but considering some thought he could have been released from the Washington squad at this point, the fact he’s still playing is sort of a win. Sort of. Still, it’s hard to overlook the fact he’s made six tackles and recorded exactly zero sacks this season.

1. Jake Delhomme, QB, Browns: Ah, the impetus for this column in the first place. Delhomme, between what the Browns and his former team, the Panthers, are paying him, is making $19.7 million this season. Doesn’t that number just absolutely blow you away? He started the first game of the season but was lost for three games with an ankle injury. Then, he backed up Seneca Wallace against the Falcons on Sunday, replaced him when he went out with an ankle injury and then reinjured his own ankle. He’s likely to be out for a while now. On the year, he’s 33 of 60 for 324 yards, one touchdown and four interceptions. Not real good. Not a real good return on Cleveland’s money either.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com