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Tag:Daryn Colledge
Posted on: February 10, 2011 12:02 am
 

Packers free agents want to get paid

C. Jenkins could be an unrestricted free agent this offseason. Posted by Josh Katzowitz

It’s never too early to think about the potential free agents that could leave the Super Bowl champion Packers. I mean, it’s only been THREE days since they bathed in confetti in Dallas, and that obviously means it’s time to discuss who’s eligible to leave and if they’re going to do so.*

*The caveat being that if the owners lock out the players, none of this will matter.

Assuming we’re playing by normal rules, here are some of the unrestricted free agents who, if they leave Green Bay, could impact next season’s squad.

K Mason Crosby, RBs John Kuhn and Brandon Jackson, DE Cullen Jenkins, G Daryn Colledge and WR James Jones. Most of them are replaceable (though Kuhn developed a nice little fan following) but Jenkins is an effective pass-rusher and Colledge is certainly above average on the offensive line.

Though Jenkins told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel he’d like to stay in Green Bay, he also understands that by not having signed a deal during the season, he’s at far greater risk to leave the squad.

“I understand it’s a business,” Jenkins said. “Hopefully, there’s not a lockout and even if there is, we can get something done. Hopefully, we can get it ironed out quickly.”

One sticking point that the Journal Sentinel points out:

Green Bay will owe LB A.J. Hawk a $10 million base salary next season. What the Packers decide to do with him – keep him, renegotiate his deal or release him to avoid paying him – will impact how they deal with the rest of their unrestricted free agents, all of whom feel they deserve to cash a nice payday after winning the Super Bowl.

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Posted on: February 6, 2011 10:12 pm
Edited on: February 7, 2011 2:22 am
 

Rodgers leads Packers to Super Bowl win

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

DALLAS – The Super Bowl experience of the Steelers didn’t matter a bit to the Packers. Neither did Ben Roethlisberger’s toughness, the Pittsburgh defense’s resolve or Brett Keisel’s beard.

Green Bay wasn’t fazed by its youth, its receivers’ inability to make relatively easy catches, or the fact EVERYBODY seemed to pick the Packers to win this game (usually meaning the Steelers would run right over Green Bay). Hell, Green Bay wasn’t even fazed by the furious comeback(s) by Pittsburgh after the Packers took an 18-point lead in the second quarter.

None of it mattered.

Not when Aaron Rodgers, playing in the biggest game of his life, refused to be intimidated by a Steelers offense that never stopped scoring points and narrowing the lead he had built in the first half. Not when he led Green Bay to a 31-25 win.



The biggest drive in the biggest game of his life came after the Steelers cut the lead to 28-25 with 7:34 to play. He was sacked on first down, and on third down, LG Daryn Colledge was called for a false start penalty to make it third and 10. Rodgers’ response: a 31-yard laser to Greg Jennings for the first down to keep the clock running.

Later in the drive, he hit James Jones for a 21-yard pass, and the Packers eventually kicked the field goal. It wasn’t exactly what Rodgers (who finished 24 of 39 for 304 yards and three touchdowns) wanted, but it gave Green Bay some breathing room. Which, it turned out, was all they needed.

Despite an iffy second half on offense and despite the fact the Packers defense clearly was impacted by the loss of CB Charles Woodson, who suffered a shoulder injury in the first half, Green Bay managed to win its first Super Bowl since the 1996 season, returning the Lombardi Trophy to the town that Lombardi put on the map.

After grabbing a 21-3 lead in the second quarter following a Jordy Nelson touchdown catch, a Nick Collins 37-yard interception return and a Jennings touchdown pass, the Packers seemed in control of the game. No, it didn’t just seem like it. The Packers WERE in control of the game.

But the Steelers made an important score late in the second quarter when WR Hines Ward caught an eight-yard touchdown pass from Ben Roethlisberger to cut the lead to 11 before halftime.

Despite an extra-long halftime – an intermission show, mind you, that not even Slash could save – Green Bay couldn’t retake the game’s momentum.

The Steelers forced Green Bay to punt on the first drive of the second half, and five plays later, Steelers RB Rashard Mendenhall completed the five-play, 50-yard drive with an eight-yard scoring run. The fact Green Bay didn’t gain a first down in the third quarter and the fact the Packers receivers couldn’t handle Rodgers’ passes didn’t bode well going into the last 15 minutes.

Until the beginning of the fourth quarter, that is, when Clay Matthews and Ryan Pickett forced a fumble from Mendenhall to take possession at the Packers 45-yard line. And despite another terrible drop from Nelson, he redeemed himself with a 38-yard catch on a third down to keep the drive going.

After a Rodgers sack, he found Jennings, who had dominated Troy Polamalu on the route, in the corner of the end zone for the eight-yard score and the 11-point lead.

Rodgers, entering the postseason, had never won a playoff game. Now he’s won a Super Bowl. He might not be the best quarterback in the league. But he’s pretty damn close. And now he’s an NFL champion.

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Posted on: February 3, 2011 9:43 am
 

Unsung heroes inside Green Bay's O-line

Posted by Andy Benoit

DALLAS -- From the “unsung heroes” department we spotlight the Green Bay Packer guards. Unlike most offensive linemen, the spotlight is something these two enjoy. Left guard Daryn Colledge was a communications major at Boise State and hopes to get into broadcasting after his playing career. Right guaJ. Sitton (US Presswire)rd Josh Sitton is the type who loves shock value. Told there would be a story about him and Colledge, he opened up the interview by saying, “Daryn Colledge is an a******.”

Sitton eventually took the interview seriously, talking about his breakout 2010 campaign.“Obviously there’s always competition in this game, but coming into this season I was pretty entrenched at the right guard spot, I knew it was going to be my job and so I could focus on me, focus on the little things, focus on the details,” he said.

Sitton declined to rank himself amongst NFL right guards, but most neutral experts will tell you he’s now somewhere near the top five. The third-year pro thrives in pass protection and has emerged as Green Bay’s most mobile run-blocker. He gets off his first block and delivers contact at the second level as smoothly as just about any player in the game.

His running mate College has always had adequate mobility; it’s been his consistency in the trenches that has wavered in past years. But playing all 16 games at the left guard position for the first time in his five-year career led to a breakthrough season (just in time for his second contract, no less).

“I have some things I’d like to do better, but being my first year that I didn’t have to move around, I feel like I’ve played strong,” Colledge said.

Pressed for specifics as to how he can improve, he replied, “I think everybody wants to play (with lower positioning), we want to be better in the run game. For me, just physically improving every single year is the goal. As soon as you get stagnant, you’re probably going to get replaced.”

Getting replaced has been a constant threat in Colledge’s career. Before this season, training camp benchings were somewhat of a ritual for the former second-round pick. Not anymore.

“Daryn Colledge has played a lot of football for us. He is a very reliable individual,” Mike McCarthy said. “He doesn’t miss practice, is very consistent.”

As for Sitton?

“I think Josh has come into his own the last two years,” McCarthy said. “In my opinion, I think he is playing at a near Pro Bowl level.”
Best of all is that the Packers can reasonably assume that both their guards still have yet to reach their full potential. Sitton, in particular, is destined to become an upper echelon blocker. “You can always get better. You’re never going to master this game,” he said.

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Posted on: February 2, 2011 1:59 am
Edited on: February 3, 2011 8:45 am
 

Green Bay Packers offensive roster breakdown

Posted by Will Brinson & Andy Benoit

Perhaps the most fascinating thing if you look (at a glance anyway) at Pittsburgh and Green Bay is that they've built their teams "properly." (AKA "the opposite of Dan Snyder.) They draft smart, and they sign smarter. At least that's what we're lead to believe, right?

Andy and I set out to check the roster breakdown for both teams. En route, we* managed to figure out not only where they're coming from, but what they'll do for their respective teams in the Super Bowl.

Name POS Acquired Scouting Report
Aaron Rodgers
QB
Drafted 24th overall, 1st Round 2005
He lacks is a weakness. One of the smartest, savviest and most athletic quarterbacks in the NFL. A Super Bowl ring might even legitimize the inevitable Is he better than Favre? discussion.
James Starks
RB
Drafted 193rd overall, 6th Round 2010
ixth-round rookie arrived on the scene just in time for Green Bay’s playoff push. Not a star, but the upright runner gives the backfield some of the burst it’s been missing.
Brandon Jackson
RB2
Drafted 63r overall, 2nd Round 2007
Doesn’t have the initial quickness or agility to be a quality NFL runner, though has at least found a niche as a pass-blocker and screen pass receiver on third downs.
John Kuhn
FB
UDFA 2005, PIT; FA 2007
Now synonymous with the term “folk hero” around Wisconsin. Has a knack for moving the chains.
Chad Clifton
LT
Drafted 44th overall, 2nd Round 2000
Superb technique and consistent pass protection earned him Pro Bowl honors for the second time in his 11-year career.
Daryn Colledge
LG
Drafted 47th overall, 2nd Round
Was finally kept at one position for 16 games, and responded with a career year. Not the strongest ox in the field, but dexterous at the second level. Packers would be wise to give him the long-term contract he wants.
Scott Wells
C
Drafted 251st overall, 7th Round
Reliable as they come. Will get jolted by bull-rushing nose tackles, but very rarely let’s that disrupt the entire play. Good mobility out in front.
Josh Sitton
RG
Drafted 135th overall, 4th Round
Arguably the best right guard in football this season. Outstanding brute force on contact, has little to no trouble reaching linebackers in the run game. What’s more, he’s at his best in pass protection.
Bryan Bulaga
RT
Drafted 23rd overall, 1st Round 2010
First-round rookie was drafted to eventually become the left tackle, but he might not have the quickness for that. Sound mechanics have made for a fairly smooth debut season.
T.J. Lang
OL
Drafted 109th overall, 4th Round 2009
Versatile player but limited athlete.
Greg Jennings
WR
Drafted 52rd overall, 2nd Round 2006
Known for his catch-and-run prowess, though his best asset is his innate feel for working back to the ball late in a play.
Donald Driver
WR
Drafted 213th overall, 7th Round 1999
The elder statesman saw his production dip in 2010 (thanks in part to a quad injury). But there’s still plenty of speed and quickness left in him.
James Jones
WR
Drafted 78th overall, 3rd Round 2007
When he’s not dropping balls he’s burning teams for long plays. Was actually Green Bay’s second most productive receiver this season.
Jordy Nelson
WR
Drafted 36th overall, 2nd Round 2007
The fact that he’s white and not constantly compared to Wes Welker or Brandon Stokley tells you what a viable field-stretching target he can be.
Andrew Quarless
TE
Drafted 154th overall, 5th Round 2010
Not Jermichael Finley, but then again, Antonio Gates isn’t even Jermichael Finley. The fifth-round rookie improved as the season wore on. Can catch what you throw him within 15 yards of the line of scrimmage.
Donald Lee
TE
Drafted 156th overall, 5th Round 2003
Scaled-back role because he’s not the blocker that Tom Crabtree is. Still athletic, though. Packers try to get him one or two touches a game, usually on a screen.

*Scouting smarts credited to Benoit. HTML and research credited to Brinson.
Posted on: November 6, 2010 11:50 pm
 

Week 9 injury report analysis Part IV

Posted by Andy Benoit

Colts @ Eagles
D. Jackson (US Presswire)
These days, it’s almost easier to list which Colts players are NOT injured. Actually, there’s only one that needs to be mentioned: Peyton Manning. He’s fine, so the Colts are fine.

Though if you MUST know more details, Anthony Gonzalez went on IR with a knee, but Austin Collie (finger) could be back this week, so it’s all a wash. Joseph Addai (shoulder) is doubtful; Mike Hart is unavaila nble after not practicing on a bad ankle all week. Cornerbacks Jerraud Powers and Justin Tryon did not practice either, due to foot injuries (or would it be feet injury?). LB Clint Session, who deserves serious Pro Bowl consideration, was hoping he could fight through a dislocated elbow and fractured forearm, but he’s out Sunday.

The Eagles have Michael Vick 100 percent healthy now that his rib injury has healed. The hope is that Vick’s favorite target, DeSean Jackson, will be able to return from his Week 6 concussion. Jackson practiced and is probable. LT King Dunlap is out with a knee, but fortunately, the man Dunlap was filling in for, Jason Peters, is back from his own knee injury. No Ellis Hobbs (hip) for Philly, which is crucial because he has always killed the Colts as a return man.

Chiefs @ Raiders

Dexter McCluster was limited in practice for the Chiefs with a high ankle sprain. The rookie did not play last week and it would probably behoove the team to be safe and sit him one more game.

Speaking of ankle sprains, Raiders superstar Nnamdi Asomugha has one. He sat out practice all week and is doubtful. It’s actually amazing Asomugha’s status is even that hopeful; on Monday, speculation was he’d miss about a month. Tight end Zach Miller was on crutches during the week and is doubtful (i.e. 99 percent certain to be out) with a foot injury.

Wideouts Louis Murphy (chest) and Chaz Schilens (knee) remain sidelined. Quarterback Bruce Gradkowski’s shoulder is still not 100 percent, which is why Jason Campbell gets the nod. Most people believe the hot-handed Campbell should keep the job anyway. This gives us a chance to pass along this tidbit from Mike Tanier, arguably the funniest football expert in the biz:

“Of course, leave it to Oakland to get stage fright after a two-game winning streak: the team was considering benching Jason Campbell in favor of Bruce Gradkowski, generating a quarterback controversy for its own sake. The Raiders ultimately decided to go with Campbell, but have said Gradkowski will return as the starter when healthy. With decisions like these, they’ll be back to punchline status by Thanksgiving.”


Cowboys @ Packers

Does anyone care who plays and doesn’t play for the Cowboys at this point? (Included in that “anyone” are the 53 Cowboys themselves.) Out of principle, we’re going to skip right ahead to the Packers.

For only the second time in a little over six years, the Packers will take the field without wide receiver Donald Driver. The veteran was ineffective the past two games trying to fight through a quad injury. Defensive lineman Ryan Pickett will once again test his injured ankle. RT Mark Tauscher remains questionable with a shoulder injury (first-round rookie Bryan Bulaga has started in place of him the past four weeks). Both starting linemen on the left side, T Chad Clifton (hamstring) and G Daryn Colledge (back), are probable. Despite constantly battling for his job, Colledge actually has a 72-game consecutive starts streak that he’s continuing to build on.

Steelers @ Bengals

DE Aaron Smith (out, triceps) is the only Steeler listed on the injury report. The Bengals’ injury report reads like the first string of the defensive depth chart. S Roy Williams, CB Johnathan Joseph, DT Tank Johnson, LB Keith Rivers, S Chinedum Ndukwe, DE Jonathan Fanene and DE Frostee Rucker are all banged up. Their status for Monday night has not yet been declared.

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Posted on: November 5, 2010 1:03 pm
 

Hot Routes 11.05.10 NFL election week news

Hot Routes

Posted by Andy Benoit


Dolphins cornerback Nolan Carroll is the son of Florida's new Lieutenant Governor-elect, Jennifer Carroll.



A column mentioning that a player’s cellphone went off when Wade Phillips was giving a speech about discipline. (And apparently Phillips let it slide.)



Ross Tucker, a rising NFL analyst who offers fantastic insight, uses a firsthand experience he had as a Cowboy to argue for why Wade Phillips needs to be fired right now.



The Chargers added a desperately-needed wide receiver Thursday: veteran Kelley Washington. And, so far, all reports indicate that Washington has not yet suffered a hamstring injury. So he should be good to go Sunday. He can also help out those downtrodden special teams.



Donte’ Stallworth is turning into Socrates.



Neither Detmer brother, Ty nor Koy, made the NFL’s Top 100 Players of All-Time list.



Neither did Phil Dawson, though some believe he’s at least the greatest kicker in Browns history.



Packers LG Daryn Colledge could see his streak of 72 consecutive starts end this Sunday (he’s dealing with a back issue -- at least he was able to practice Friday). Packer fans might be saying, “72 straight starts? Ha! Big deal! We once had a quarterback here who started…you know what, never mind.”



The South Florida media enjoys the weekly Thursday visits with Brandon Marshall.



Believe it or not, but the Saints have not defeated the Panthers two times in a row in five years.



A great matchup this Sunday will be Jets underrated right guard Brandon Moore against Lions sensational rookie defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh.



Bruce Gradkowski is making progress with his shoulder, but Tom Cable is still going with Jason Campbell against the Chiefs this week.

Will this be the week Andy Reid suffers his first head coaching loss after a bye?



NFL Players recently voted James Harrison as the hardest hitter in the league. (It’s not known whether illegal hits were included or not included in the players’ decision.)


Niners LB Takeo Spikes and CB Shawntae Spencer had a heartfelt Q and A in front of the media recently.


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Posted on: October 29, 2010 9:55 am
 

Week 8 Key Matchup: Jets D vs. Packers O

Posted by Andy Benoit

The New York Jets might be the only team in the NFL where the scheme is more important than the players executing it. At least, this is true for the front seven. (Of course, it’s only true for the front seven because the back four, and specifically cornerback Darrelle Revis, is so dominant. So maybe, at the end of the day, the players are still more important than the scheme. It’s a chicken or egg thing.)

Anyway…about that scheme…R. Ryan

One of the greatest misconceptions in football is that Rex Ryan’s Jets are strictly a blitzing defense. When the Jets bring pressure, it’s not always in the form of a blitz. Often times, the Jets rush only four. But unlike a 4-3 scheme, where the four rushers are downlinemen, a 3-4 scheme allows for a linebacker to rush. The Jets have mastered the art of what scouts call a “zone exchange”, which is to say, the Jets are great at disguising which linebacker will rush. This often creates the illusion of a blitz, as opposing offensive lines struggle to identify assignments and wind up scrambling from out of position.

So why is New York better than other teams in this department? For one, Ryan is fantastic at creating congestion on one side of a line of scrimmage and bringing clean pressure from the other. The Jets will overload on say, the right side of a line. They’ll force an offensive line to slide its protection to the right, but once the ball is snapped, they’ll drop a handful of those would-be rushers back into zone, leaving the offense with four linemen blocking two pass-rushers. Over on the left side, a defensive back or linebacker will rush through what is now an open alley.

This concept demands speed from the pass-rusher, which is why that pass-Green Bay (US Presswire)rusher is often a safety or nickelback. Fans automatically assume this is a blitz. But watch closely and you’ll see, often times, the Jets are still only rushing four players. In order for this to work, you need agile, versatile linebackers (like, say, a Jason Taylor or a Bryan Thomas).

This leads us to the next topic: the results. We think of pressuring a quarterback as generating sacks. The Jets think of it as generating incompletions. The Jets recorded a modest 32 sacks in 2009. But they forced opponents into an incomplete pass a league-best 48.3 percent of the time. Their zone exchanges aim to not just reach a quarterback, but make him believe he’s under siege. That way, he’ll hurry his throw.

The Packers have had their fair share of pass protection woes, though their offensive line is far more cohesive than it was at this point a year ago. Left tackle Chad Clifton is playing perhaps the best football of his career. Left guard Daryn Colledge has been more consistent. Center Scott Wells is as steady as a calendar. Right guard Josh Sitton is one of the bright young run-blockers in the game (and he’s been adequate on passing downs). Right tackle Bryan Bulaga has struggled early on, but unlike last year’s struggling right tackle, Allen Barbre, Bulaga at least has first-round talent to fall back on. (That said, the Packers will probably go back to Mark Tauscher once the veteran is healthy.)

Despite these decent offensive line improvements, expect the Packers to spread the field with four-receiver sets against New York, with two of the receivers split outside the hash marks. Doing this will discourage the Jets from overloading in the box and being ultra aggressive with blitzing defensive backs. And, when the Jets decide to overload and bring defensive backs anyway, Rodgers, with four wide targets at his disposal, should have a quickly-defined read. This plays into Green Bay’s offense, as the Packers love the quick-striking passing game.

The onus will be on the Packer receivers to make plays after the catch. Either James Jones or Jordy Nelson will have to be in the 80-90-yard range receiving. And with the Jets putting Revis on Greg Jennings, it’s critical Donald Driver (quad) be effective.

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Posted on: August 29, 2010 10:19 pm
Edited on: August 29, 2010 11:14 pm
 

Bulaga won't start after all

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

It’s rarely a good thing when a player who has lost a battle for a starting position isn’t informed of the coach’s decision until the media who have been informed of the coach’s decision asks said player about … um … said decision.

Such was the case today when Green Bay coach Mike McCarthy declared that Daryn Colledge (that's his mug shot on the right) had won the starting LG job over first-round pick Bryan Bulaga for the season-opener against the Eagles.

The Green Bay Press Gazette has the story.

After he was told he would not be a starter, Bulaga said, “This is the first I know about it, so we’ll see. I’m sure they have a plan and we’ll just take it day by day. … He won the job, Coach made a decision. That’s what it is. Obviously I’m disappointed I’m not the guy, but been nicked up a little bit. That’s just the way it goes.”

I do love Colledge’s response, though.

“Awesome, I didn’t know I wasn’t the starter originally,” said Colledge.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com