Tag:Dez Bryant
Posted on: January 19, 2012 4:13 pm
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Dez Bryant feuding with Lil Wayne?

BryantBy Josh Katzowitz

You know what Dez Bryant could use? Like, really, really bad? Some kind of, um, accountant who helps make sure all of Bryant’s supposed debts are paid off before another “Dez Bryant apparently owes somebody money” story comes out in the process.

Oh wait, too late.

As the Fort Worth Star Telegram writes, the Cowboys volatile receiver apparently got into a fight outside a ritzy hotel in Miami Beach on Sunday, and reportedly, his tussle was with the crew of rapper Lil Wayne.

Of course it was.

The fight apparently began because Lil Wayne’s people were blasting Bryant over unpaid debts he owes a high-end micro-finance company called Endurance Capital Fund. The Star-Telegram writes that company has ties to Lil’ Wayne’s record label Young Money Entertainment.

Bryant was briefly detained by police, but he wasn’t arrested. Obviously, though, Bryant’s money problems haven’t gone away yet.

So, that makes about $50,000 (out of an original loan of $100,000) he supposedly owes EFC and $600,000 he owed a Dallas jeweler. Therefore, if Bryant comes to you seeking money, it’s probably best to decline the loan request at this point.

But Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said recently that Bryant is NOT in debt, claiming, "His maturation over the last two years has been outstanding. Relative to his habits with meetings, on time, timeliness, preparation and the kinds of things we were concerned about when we drafted him he's made tremendous progress."

Lil Wayne, I assume, would beg to differ.

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Posted on: December 31, 2011 6:27 pm
 

Jones: Dez Bryant HAS paid off his debts

BryantBy Josh Katzowitz

A couple days ago, we told you about how Cowboys receiver Dez Bryant supposedly owed a micro-finance company $50,000 out of an original $100,000 loan.

Endurance Capital Fund, which helps athletes and entertainers buy large luxury items, went so far as to release a statement to the Boston Herald that said, “"We have reached out to everybody from Mr. Bryant’s agent to his mortgage broker to try to get this debt repaid.  Everyone acknowledges the debt, but nobody will come forward to repay it. This is a unique and disappointing experience. We have never had a client refuse to repay their debt before.”

But Cowboys owner Jerry Jones says that isn’t true. And he says Bryant is up to date on his debt payments.

"I've got some familiarity with the details, quite a bit familiarity with the details of this business that he had this week off the field,” Jones said on his weekly radio show (via the Dallas Morning News). "I would say that that is the reason you have disagreements. I know firsthand that the bill was paid and accepted, so I can't say and wouldn't say any more about that."

While Bryant has had numerous problems off the field (he’s been sued by jewelers and cited for wearing his pants too low in a mall, and he’s weirdly ranted and raved on the sidelines of games), Jones says he’s proud of Bryant.

"His maturation over the last two years has been outstanding,” Jones said. “Relative to his habits with meetings, on time, timeliness, preparation and the kinds of things we were concerned about when we drafted him he's made tremendous progress."

And if he’s actually paying off his debts without having to go to court, that’s another step in the right direction.

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Posted on: December 29, 2011 2:51 pm
 

Tony Romo practices with wrap, likely to start

Romo reportedly is 'fine' for Week 17's game. (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

The primary concern for Sunday night's NFC East "championship game" is the hand of Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo. Last we left Romo, he was reportedly "fine" and looked like he would start on Sunday against the Giants.

Our Cowboys Rapid Reporter Nick Eatman lends further credence to the belief that Romo will play, reporting that Romo practiced on Thursday with a "light wrap" on his hand and is now "likely" to start.

The issue for the Cowboys and Romo is the amount of swelling in the quarterback's hand. If he's unable to properly grip and throw the ball, then Dallas could struggle.

And if the injury makes him tentative in the pocket, then the Giants pass rush could certainly ramp up the pressure on Dallas offense.

But the news that Romo's at least able to practice and test out the strength he's got with a banged-up hand is huge. Though Stephen McGee didn't look like the worst quarterback in the world last Saturday afternoon, Dallas offense simply isn't the same when Romo's not on the field.

Knocking him out of the game would all but ensure that the Giants took home the division title this season.



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Posted on: December 29, 2011 11:06 am
 

Film Room: Giants vs. Cowboys preview


Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit


An NFC East championship game in primetime – no further introduction needed. Here’s the breakdown.

1. Reviewing Week 14
These teams gave us a classic Sunday night showdown just a few weeks ago. That contest was defined by mistakes more than anything. Tony Romo posted good numbers but missed a few throws that would have changed the outcome. His only completion to Dez Bryant was a 50-yard touchdown against a blown coverage.

The Cowboys defense blew several coverages of its own, leading to a 400-yard night for Eli Manning and prompting Rob Ryan later to scale back the complexity of his scheme in 2:00 type situations. Big-time throws against poor pass defense was why a game that was 34-22 Cowboys with under 6:00 to play wound up being 37-34 Giants.

2. The star quarterbacks in big games
The common perception is that Eli Manning is a big game riser and Tony Romo is a big game faller. The Week 14 battle only reaffirmed this; Manning was absolutely magnificent on the final two touchdown drives, fitting balls into tight windows and, as he’d been doing all night, quickly diagnosing and dissecting the Cowboys’ Byzantine blitzes. Romo, on the other hand, missed a third-and-five throw to Miles Austin with 2:25 remaining that would have sealed the win.

That throw came against an all-out, Cover 0 blitz. In the past, Romo’s inability to recognize blitzes before and after the snap often led to his blunders. Those issues, however, have been largely corrected this season. And yet, because of what happened against the Jets in Week 1, and because of the interception-riddled second half meltdown against the Lions in Week 4, Romo’s reputation remains that of a choker.

That’s mostly an unfair and overly simplistic characterization of a quality veteran. If not for the botched field goal hold at Seattle in the ’06 wild card loss – a play that had nothing to do with quarterbacking skills – Romo almost certainly wouldn’t be thought of as a late-game anything.
 
That said, Romo has indeed made some mistakes in critical moments. Most of those have been due to defenses confounding him with false looks. The broadcast viewers might tie this to Romo feeling stressed in crunch time; the film viewers tie it back to Romo’s mediocrity at reading defenses before the snap. When you’re a sandlot player, you’re reactionary. A reactionary player is much easier to trick – especially late in games after he’s gotten comfortable reacting to certain looks the same way.

This same concept applies in the other direction with Manning. He’s a splendid field general, audibling at the line of scrimmage, running the no-huddle offense and trusting his eyes and underrated arm strength in the face of pressure. While reactive quarterbacking is prone to defensive manipulation late in games, proactive quarterbacking is apt for defensive manipulation. You change your defensive looks and play aggressively to bait a reactionary quarterback into a mistake. Against a proactive quarterback, you change your looks and play aggressively so that he doesn’t bait you into a mistake.

The relevance of this sexy “big moment quarterbacking” storyline is debatable. As stated before, Romo has improved his mental approach to the game. And just because Manning has been great in crunch time doesn’t mean he’s unstoppable (especially given how up-and-down his receivers have been).

Dez needs to work on his disappearing act. (Getty Images)

3. Pass games
It’s been far too easy for defenses to take away Dez Bryant this season. The Giants had no trouble doing this with Corey Webster a few weeks ago. They also took away Jason Witten by smacking him with a defensive end or linebacker as he came off the line. Don’t be surprised if the Cowboys split Witten to the slot to prevent this from happening again.

Also, don’t be surprised if the Cowboys line up in three receiver sets to force the Giants into their nickel D. That nickel D has been poor in coverage the past few weeks, mainly because of Prince Amukamara. The first-round rookie has since been benched, with safety Antrel Rolle moving back to slot corner. The Cowboys should eagerly test Rolle with either Miles Austin or Laurent Robinson, both excellent route runners.

4. Run games
The Cowboys lost DeMarco Murray for the season in their last meeting with the Giants. Felix Jones showed his uncanny burst and acceleration in the lone game of consequence since then (Week 15 at Tampa Bay), but that was against the worst run defense in football.

It remains to be seen whether the Cowboys can sustain on the ground against a quality opponent. Expect them to try to establish the run, especially if the Giants play their three-safety nickel defense against base offensive personnel (something they did a bit against the Jets). Jones’ might also run out of three-receiver sets against that nickel D, as that’s a good way to take advantage of his proficiency on draws.

New York’s run game remains unimpressive, though there were a few signs of life last week. Brandon Jacobs and Ahmad Bradshaw both ran with power after averaging barely one yard per carry after contact against the Redskins in Week 15. David Baas is back at center after missing several weeks with migraines. Baas has been below average overall this season but at least offers a tad more short-area mobility than backup Kevin Boothe.

5. Up tempo?
The Meadowlands crowd will be in full throat – especially early. The Cowboys may want to go no-huddle to quell the crowd and dictate the flow.

A quick tempo can also be a good way to calm a pass-rush, which is critical when facing Justin Tuck, Jason Pierre-Paul and, perhaps, Osi Umenyiora. And the less time the Giants defense has between snaps, the harder it will be for them to change their coverages, which coordinator Perry Fewell likes to do.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all Week 17 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: December 28, 2011 5:18 pm
 

Report: Dez Bryant owes finance company $50K

BryantBy Josh Katzowitz

You might recall that Dez Bryant has had some legal trouble in the past year. He’s apparently worn his baggy pants too low at the mall and hadn’t paid off a $600,000 debt to a jeweler. It was enough to cause the Cowboys to express concern about off-the-field habits, while others, like my CBSSports.com colleague Mike Freeman. wondered about his on-field behavior.

Although Bryant said at the time of the jewelry story incident that he had a handle on his money problems, that might not be the case after all.

That’s because, according to the Boston Herald, Bryant refuses to pay off a $100,000 loan to Endurance Capital Fund, a micro-finance company based out of New York. The Herald writes that the debt is a year past due and that Bryant still owes more than $50,000.

The micro-finance company helps athletes and entertainers obtain large luxury items, and apparently, it’s unsuccessfully attempted to serve Bryant with a lawsuit in Dallas.

This from the ECF statement to Ian Rapoport of the Herald: “This was a simple transaction with a loan agreement and promissory note reviewed by Mr. Bryant’s advisors and signed by Mr. Bryant. We held up our side of the bargain, now we are simply asking that Mr. Bryant follow through with what he promised to do.

"We have reached out to everybody from Mr. Bryant’s agent to his mortgage broker to try to get this debt repaid.  Everyone acknowledges the debt, but nobody will come forward to repay it. This is a unique and disappointing experience. We have never had a client refuse to repay their debt before.”

With so many claims to Bryant’s money, you have to wonder what exactly happened to the five-year, $11.8 million contract ($8.5 million in guarantees) he signed before his rookie year.

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Posted on: December 24, 2011 4:49 pm
Edited on: December 24, 2011 5:00 pm
 

Tony Romo out with hand injury; Stephen McGee in

By Will Brinson

The Cowboys are currently losing to Philadelphia but that's not the bad news for Dallas. The bad news is that Tony Romo is probably done for the day with a right hand injury after taking a nasty hit from Jason Babin.

Of course, the worst news for the Cowboys is that he suffered the injury in a game that ultimately won't matter -- after the game began, the Giants finished off the Jets in New York, eliminating the Eagles from the playoff race and setting the stage for a Week 17 matchup between the Giants and Cowboys to decide the NFC East.

Stephen McGee's currently under center for the Cowboys, and it's hard to imagine that he won't stay there.

Romo returned to the sideline and had a pretty intense talk with the training staff; he's now on the sidelines with a baseball cap, and it makes sense to keep him there for the rest of the day.

Dallas needs a lot of help to make the postseason as a wild card, but they control their own fate in terms of the division. Romo suffering another injury that could put his status for the finale in doubt would be an unmitigated disaster

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Posted on: December 7, 2011 10:43 am
Edited on: December 7, 2011 12:05 pm
 

Film Room: Cowboys vs. Giants preview

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit


A hallmark rivalry renews Sunday night with the first of a two-game series between the Cowboys and Giants that will likely decide the NFC East. We’ve recently grown familiar with the Giants as they’ve spent the past few weeks on football’s center stage (Patriots-Eagles-Saints-Packers!).

In examining whether they can break their slump and get back above .500, we take an in-depth look at how they match up with this week’s familiar foe.


1. Stopping DeMarco Murray
New York’s most valuable contributor Sunday night might just be Jason Garrett. The Cowboys’ play-caller unwisely drifted away from Murray in the second half against the Dolphins on Thanksgiving, and he all but abandoned Murray against the Cardinals last week (12 carries, just seven after the first quarter).

Garrett’s pass-first decision at Arizona was likely in response to the aggression of the Cardinals linebackers. They recklessly attacked downhill much of the game, often as part of designed blitzes. Garrett may have felt that passing against an iffy and over-leveraged Cardinals secondary was the best response.

That said, Garrett can’t simply let Murray become an afterthought. The rookie running back has been the stabilizing force of the Cowboys’ offense. In recent weeks, the Cowboys’ front line has played with enough power in the ground game that, with the help of fluid H-back John Phillips, it’s realistic to think they could push the pile against aggressive linebacking. Even if they couldn’t, Garrett could still feature his young back in the passing game. Murray has soft hands and is smart in protection. Screen passes are a great way to punish fast downhill linebackers.
 
Expect the Giants to attack with their second level defenders much in the same way the Cardinals did. Defensive coordinator Perry Fewell knows that this might make Garrett one-dimensional in his play-calling. What’s more, the way to contain Murray is to make him go east and west early in the run. He has decent lateral agility and change-of-direction but only if he’s already built momentum.

By shooting the gaps, the Giants will push Murray to the perimeter, where he’s less dangerous. If the Giants continue to operate out of their big nickel package (two linebackers, three safeties), they’ll have enough speed on the field to chase the outside runs.

2. Cowboys passing game
Shooting the gaps against Murray will leave New York more susceptible to play-action passing and one-on-one matchups downfield. That’s a risk the Giants should be willing to take. They have a quasi-shutdown corner in Corey Webster.

They likely believe they can cover Jason Witten with one of their three safeties, or even with athletic linebacker Jacquian Williams. Williams was matched one-on-one against Jimmy Graham and Jermichael Finley the past two weeks. He was defeated in both matchups, but the Giants may be inclined to trust him again this week. Witten is elite, but he’s a prototypical tight end, not an insanely athletic hybrid wideout like Graham or Finley.

The Cowboys’ passing attack is interesting. Early in the season, it flowed through Witten. A few weeks ago, most noticeably on Thanksgiving, it was flowing through Laurent Robinson (a graceful, long-striding, deceptively fast street free agent who has blossomed now that he’s finally stayed healthy). Last week, it flowed through Dez Bryant, even though Bryant was defended by rising star Patrick Peterson. And keep in mind, last season, the passing attack flowed through Miles Austin, who may return this week from his hamstring injury.

In Dallas’ system, the go-to target is often determined by whom Tony Romo feels most comfortable with. Romo’s comfort may be influenced by the rhythm of the game. When things are grinding, Witten’s the guy. When everything flows, it’s Robinson. When it’s a sporadic, sandlot type game, he likes Bryant. The Giants will have studied the Cowboys’ offense all week. Whom they decide to put No. 1 corner Webster on will tell you who THEY think Romo likes most.

3. Tyron Smith
The first-round rookie right tackle from USC has been better than advertised, showing improvement with every start. Smith, the youngest player in the NFL, has uncommonly light feet for 310-pounder. He’s dripping with athleticism, which is evident when he lands blocks off short-area movement in the run game. His technique continues to be a work in progress – he was exploited by wily defenders early in the season and had a tough time against Cameron Wake two games ago – but it’s much better at this point than most expected.

That said, there may not be a worse player to face in a war of fundamentals than Justin Tuck. The seventh-year veteran has had a down season, but he’s still one of the craftiest – if not THE craftiest – ends in football.

If the Giants cared about our viewing entertainment, they’d move Tuck to the defensive right side and let Jason Pierre-Paul, the most dynamic young athlete playing defensive end today, go mano-a-mano against Smith.

4. Rob Ryan’s pass-rush tactics
Rob Ryan’s primary focus is on creating one-on-one situations for DeMarcus Ware. The league’s most prolific sack artist over the last five years almost always aligns on the open side of the offensive formation (i.e. away from the tight end).

To help ensure more one-on-ones for Ware – and to simply generate as much pressure as possible – Ryan walks safeties down into the box (Abe Elam’s physical strength is a plus for this), uses fire-X blitzes with his inside linebackers (where the left linebacker attacks the right A-gap and the right linebacker attacks the left A-gap) and often brings cornerback Orlando Scandrick off the edge from the slot (Scandrick is an excellent blitzer).

Ryan may want to be a bit cautious this week. Eli Manning is superb at identifying blitzes and audibling. Plus, it was on a double A-gap blitz that Ryan got outsmarted by Ken Whisenhunt with a screen pass for LaRod Stephens-Howling on the overtime touchdown last week. Ahmad Bradshaw is very good in the screen game.



5. Defending Cruz
Over the years, the Giants have had a field day going after Orlando Scandrick with slot receiver Steve Smith. Scandrick has drastically improved all-around in his third season. But the Giants also have a more dynamic slot weapon in surprising 1,000-yard receiver Victor Cruz. Cruz has big, ball-plucking hands and sinewy body control that allow him to make late adjustments to the ball. His powerful elusiveness after the catch makes him a threat to score on any play.

If Scandrick is blitzing or outside, the Cowboys are more likely to play a zone or some sort of off-coverage in the slot. The Cardinals had their outside and slot receivers align tight to one another last week, which the Cowboys defended by playing off-coverage inside. That left easy eight-yard completions on the table. Manning will gladly take those if given the opportunity.

The Cowboys may defend the seam with safety help – which could keep Cruz, as well as surprising downfield producer Jake Ballard, in-check. In that case, Scandrick would be an underneath defender, where he’s most comfortable. The cost here is that this safety help would either water down some of the blitz designs or leave one-on-one coverage against Hakeem Nicks outside.

Rob Ryan’s best bet might be to mix and match with disguise, in hopes of setting up a Manning turnover.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all Week 14 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: December 1, 2011 11:22 am
 

Top Ten with a Twist: Second-year players

Gronkowski

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

It’s too easy to talk about the best rookies of the season (Von Miller, Cam Newton, Andy Dalton, blah, blah, blah) -- hell  you could find that list just about anywhere online. But the Top Ten with a Twist list strives to take you a little deeper than the surface. So, we talk about the best players who are in their SECOND year of playing in the NFL.

Like last year when we touted players like Clay Matthews, Arian Foster and LeSean McCoy, as well as players like (sigh) Johnny Knox, Knowshon Moreno and Mark Sanchez, we’re giving it another shot to discuss the best players from the 2010 draft. But this year, we guarantee the players on this top-10 list will be Hall of Fame bound one day.

Because if there’s one thing we know for certain, by the time NFLers are in their second year of playing pro football, they’ve got it all figured out. Or maybe not.

10. Earl Thomas: As a rookie safety last year, he recorded 76 tackles and five interceptions. While he’s only got one pick this season, he’s already at 71 tackles. Some observers before this season compared him to Troy Polamalu, and while Thomas clearly hasn’t reached that level yet, Thomas has plenty of talent to justify his first-round selection.

9. Jason Pierre-Paul: He didn’t get much notice last season, but the injuries to Osi Umenyiora and a slew of other Giants have gotten him more playing time. He’s taken advantage, recording 10.5 sacks and 50 tackles on the season. And he’s still only 22 years old. That’s scary.

8. Pat Angerer: If you don’t know much about Angerer, that makes sense. He plays in the black hole known as Indianapolis. But he’s quietly put together one of the best seasons by a linebacker this year. He leads the league with 112 tackles. He’s made at least seven tackles in every game this season, and four times, he’s entered into double digits (including 21 in Week 3 vs. the Steelers, the most for the Colts since Bob Sanders in 2005). Just think how much you would know about him if he played for a team that could win a game.

7. Dez Bryant: He’s shown immense talent the past two seasons, but he’s also shown erratic behavior on the field (ranting and raving on the sideline) and off the field (lawsuits for alleged unpaid jewelry services, charges of sagging his pants at a mall). He should be -- and could be -- one of the best receivers in the game at some point in the near future, but if you’re in the Cowboys organization, how much can you really trust the guy?

Tebow6. Joe Haden: He’s a little more invisible than many others because he’s playing for a franchise that struggles, and he doesn’t have the stats of a top-notch cornerback (he’s recorded exactly zero interceptions this season vs. six during his rookie year). But he certainly has big-time play-making ability (opposing offenses have tended to avoid throwing his way), and though he can be a little inconsistent, he’s got the talent to move into that elite level of defensive back.

5. Tim Tebow: He has to be on this list, right? And I’m not even kidding.

4. Eric Decker: Hmm, maybe Josh McDaniels’ 2010 draft wasn’t all that terrible after all. Decker has become the team’s best receiver, and when Tebow gets rolling in the last few minutes of every game, Decker is usually the one making amazing catches to help the cause. Just think what he could do if he had a quarterback who could actually make NFL throws.

3. Ndamukong Suh: As we’ve been saying since the beginning of forever ago, Suh needs to get a better handle on his intensity if he wants to keep the NFL out of his wallet, because it’s pretty clear that he’s one of the dirtiest players out there. And now that he’s been suspended two games, it’s hurting his team. He hasn’t been as good this year as he was last season -- facing more double-teams and all -- but still, he’s one of the most feared defenders in the league.

2. Jimmy Graham: If Rob Gronkowski is the best all-around tight end in the game (see below), Graham is close on his heels. Graham didn’t begin making an impact in New Orleans until midway through his rookie season, but he’s a hot commodity now, leading all tight ends with 67 catches for 957 yards. He has quickly become Drew Brees’ favorite target, and for any pass-catcher in the NFL, that’s a very good thing.

1.Rob Gronkowski: In his second season, he’s already become the most complete tight end in the game. He can block, he can catch, he can score touchdowns and he can spike the hell out of the ball when the play is finished. Plus, the guy hangs out with porn stars. He’s living the life right now. He’s got 60 catches for a 14.4 yards average and 11 scores (more than anybody not named Calvin Johnson), and simply put, he has been a pleasure to watch this season.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com