Tag:Evan Dietrich-Smith
Posted on: January 12, 2012 11:28 am
Edited on: January 12, 2012 11:39 am
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Without Philbin, Packers feel his absence

Joe Philbin hasn't been at practice since his son died (AP).By Josh Katzowitz

As the Packers continue to ready themselves for their showdown with the Giants this weekend, they’re having to practice and prepare through the pain that offensive coordinator Joe Philbin is feeling after his son, Michael, drowned in the Fox River last Sunday morning in Oshkosh, Wis.

Philbin has not returned to the team since police positively identified the body, and it’s not clear if and when he’ll be available for the team’s playoff run. Until then, the Packers continue on with heavy hearts.

"Honestly, there's nothing anybody can really say that'll make the pain go away,” Packers guard T.J. Lang, said via the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Philbin wasn’t in Green Bay for Packers practice Wednesday, and afterward, an emotional Mike McCarthy told the assembled media, “The reality of this just gave everybody a punch in the heart to let you know the reality how fortunate to be where we are."

Without Philbin at the team facility during the week of preparation, McCarthy had delegated Philbin’s responsibilities to other assistant coaches. As the newspaper writes, “Philbin doesn't call plays on Sundays. The offense is in McCarthy's vision with a MVP front-runner serving as the triggerman. But Philbin is a behind-the-scenes force that keeps the unit in unison. He's the one leading offensive meetings at the start of each week, breaking down certain plays.”

And at the end of the week, when the team is finishing up its final practice, Philbin takes over the drill as the first-team offense goes against the scout-team defense. As the Journal Sentinel relates, "'It's a lively scene,' (Evan) Dietrich-Smith said. Players are jumping, yelling and trying to stump the starters. Philbin raises the urgency. It's one way he pushes Rodgers and the offense as a whole."

So, how do the Packers cope for now?

"When you step into our building, you have to find a way to focus on the task at hand and when you go home you deal with things there," said Lang, who also revealed that he’s been dealing with the emotions brought on by a sick father. "But I think we've always had a strong team. We're a very close team.

"Guys rally around each other when you're going through tough times."





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Posted on: November 30, 2011 5:09 pm
Edited on: November 30, 2011 5:55 pm
 

Suh's appeal hearing set for Thursday afternoon

Suh

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

We told you Tuesday about the two-game suspension handed down to Ndamukong Suh by the NFL for stomping all over our hopes and dreams the arm of Packers guard Evan Dietrich-Smith last Thursday and about how Suh -- who didn’t apologize and then did -- immediately appealed Roger Goodell’s decision.

Suh's stomping good time
The reports about the matter said the NFL would expedite the matter and render a decision on the appeal as soon as possible so the team would know before this Sunday. The league wasn’t kidding about that.

According to ESPN’s Adam Schefter, Suh’s appeal will be heard via conference call Thursday at 3 p.m. ET by former Raiders coach Art Shell.

The interesting thing about the appeals officer is that Shell has been in management as a head coach but he also knows what it’s like to play the game as well -- he was a Hall of Fame left tackle for the Raiders from 1968-82. And according to NFL.com’s Jason LaCanfora, Shell isn’t necessarily biased against one side or the other.

Shell is not a league employee, and he’s compensated by the NFL AND the NFLPA. So, Suh should get as fair a hearing as possible. So, you might see Suh’s punishment slightly reduced (we have seen the league willing to bend on that issue before), and if not, he'll be eligible to return to the team Dec. 12 before a road game against Oakland. But for Shell to overturn the entire suspension: don’t count on that to happen.

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Posted on: November 27, 2011 1:05 pm
Edited on: November 27, 2011 1:06 pm
 

Casserly: Suh's antics aren't surprising



Posted by Ryan Wilson

It looks like Lions defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh can expect to be suspended two games for his actions during Thursday's Packers game. During The NFL Today's pregame show, James Brown asked NFL insider Charley Casserly if there was any indication of Suh's behavior coming out of Nebraska.

Is Ndamukong Suh dirty?

Casserly's response: 

"I talked to general managers and scouting directors over the weekend and they me absolutely there were red lights at Nebraska and even before that that did not surprise them when they see Suh behave like this in the NFL. …

"Furthermore, when the league goes in to decide how long to suspend -- if they're going to suspend Suh -- one of the things that will work in Suh's favor is that he was ejected from the game … so he has a little bit of time served already. … Comissioner Goodell, in his tenure, has suspended five players. Only one of them, Albert Haynesworth, was suspended for more than one game.

"Finally, the Detroit Lions are going to lose something here too. Suh's salary is a little over $82,000 per week. If he's suspended for more than one game that means the total fines for the year for the Lions will be over $100,000. There's a new rule in the league: over $100,000 and the team has to pay it. So now what happens? The Lions will have to pay if Suh is suspended for one game."

As for what punishment Suh should face: "I think he should be suspended two games."



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Posted on: November 27, 2011 10:58 am
Edited on: November 28, 2011 11:18 am
 

Report: Ndamukong Suh to be suspended 2 games



Posted by Ryan Wilson

We probably won't know Ndamukong Suh's fate until Monday or Tuesday, but that doesn't mean it's still not one of the biggest stories of Week 12. Suh, one of the Lions' best players, was ejected from the Thanksgiving Day game against the Packers for stomping on Green Bay guard Evan Dietrich-Smith's arm.

On Sunday, ESPN's Adam Schefter reports that Suh is expected to be suspended for at least two games. 

Is Ndamukong Suh dirty?

After the his ejection Thursday, Suh offered up a lame excuse for his actions before apologizing a day later on his Facebook page.

Suh said he's now ready to move on from the incident.

"I want to reiterate my commitment to working to become a better player, and professional—on and off the field. My reaction on Thursday was unacceptable. I made a mistake, and have learned from it. I hope to direct the focus back to the task at hand — by winning," Suh wrote on Facebook.

But it's not enough to just say you're sorry and you're ready to get on with the rest of your life. In addition to how severely the NFL will punish him, there are also concerns in the Lions' locker room about Suh's antics. Specifically, some of his teammates are also tired of it. NFL Network's Jason La Canfora confirmed as much during Sunday's NFL GameDay Morning.

"The interesting thing, there are people in his own locker room that think [a suspension's] called for," La Canfora said.



Does a reported two-game punishment fit the crime? No idea. (Worth noting: CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman warns that, given NFL commissioner Roger Goodell's history of suspending players, we shouldn't expect a huge punishment for Suh.) But if it's to the point where Suh's teammates are fed up, then maybe a stiffer sanction will have a better chance of getting through to him, and in his words, help him "to become a better player, and professional—on and off the field."

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Posted on: November 25, 2011 11:03 am
Edited on: November 26, 2011 11:31 am
 

Former ref: Suh should get multi-game suspension

Suh's having a hard time convincing people that stomping on a Packers player was an accident. (US PRESSWIRE)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

The fallout from Ndamukong Suh's two-step on Packers gaurd Evan Dietrich-Smith's arm during the Thanksgiving Day game continues unabated. The Lions defensive tackle offered a mealy-mouthed explanation for actions that can't be categorized as anything but intentional.

"I was on top of a guy being pulled down," Suh said, according to CBSSports.com's Pete Prisco. "I was trying to get up off the ground. You see me pushing his helmet down because I was trying to remove myself from the situation. As I'm getting up, I'm getting pushed, so I'm getting myself in balance and getting away from the situation. I know what I did and the man upstairs knows what I did. Not by any means [did he intentionally step on Dietrich-Smith]."

Uh-huh. Suh's words don't agree with Suh's actions.



CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman wrote Thursday that any punishments coming Suh's way (which could very well include a suspension) won't happen until the rest of the Week 12 games have been played.

But former NFL VP of Officiating Mike Pereira, who now works for FOX Sports, thinks that Suh's "not dirty, he's filthy" and that his latest antics should lead to a multiple-game suspension.

Is Ndamukong Suh dirty?

"Suh met with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell recently to discuss his on-field play and afterward said he had a better understanding of how to play the game within the rules. I would say he needs another lesson — or two. Maybe three."

We wrote Thursday that the league suspended Albert Haynesworth five games for stomping on the head of then-Cowboys center Andre Gurode, but we also noted that Suh's kick, while clearly dirty, unnecessary and intentional wasn't nearly as malicious or dangerous as what Haynesworth did. Then again, it's not clear Goodell weighs actual harm inflicted vs. intent when handing down sanctions.

But as PFT.com's Gregg Rosenthal points out, what Suh did was no worse than what the Vikings' Brian Robison perpetrated on an unsuspecting T.J. Lang (incidentally, also of the Packers) earlier this season when he kicked him in the family jewels. Robison was fined $20,000. Unlike Suh, however, Robison wasn't a chronic offender. Also unlike Suh, Robison apologized.


Lang, who now undoubtedly wears a cup every time he leaves the house, was asked Thursday about the play that got Suh ejected.

"That's (expletive)," he said, according to the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel's Tyler Dunne. "He clearly had Evan by the face mask pinned to the ground. His explanation is crap. There's no room for that. It's a dumb penalty. He hurt his own team today."

Packers tight end Andrew Quarless was even more unimpressed.

"He was lucky I wasn't on the field," he said. "Lucky. I'm a New York guy. I don't go for that stuff. It was very unnecessary. I can understand you might get in a scuffle, but you never stomp on a guy. That's like hitting a guy when he's down. You don't do things like that. I was this close to running on the field."

Finally, there's this from radio host and Houston Chronicle blogger Lance Zierlein, via Twitter: "Heard from some people at Nebraska that Suh was just as dirty in practice vs his own teammates. Angry dude."

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com