Play Fantasy Use your Fantasy skills to win Cash Prizes. Join or start a league today. Play Now
 
Tag:Fuzzy Thurston
Posted on: June 28, 2011 1:49 pm
Edited on: June 28, 2011 2:14 pm
 

Hot Routes 6.28.11: NFL, NFLPA holed up in Minn.



Posted by Josh Katzowitz

  • The players and the owners have again convened to negotiate a new CBA. The newest location? The great state of Minnesota, also the home of U.S. magistrate judge Arthur Boylan.
  • CBSSports.com’s Andy Benoit, writing for the NY Times, lists his top-10 quarterbacks.
  • LB Jason Taylor apparently wants to play one more season for the Jets. New York released him before the lockout, but it’s not out of the question that he could return for a reduced salary.
  • How much is a name worth? Well, if you want that name on the New Meadowlands Stadium, it’s going to cost about $17 million per year.
  • Bengals RB Cedric Benson, who will stand trial on an assault charge, had his trial moved to Aug. 29 after his attorneys requested more time. If convicted, Benson could face up to a year in prison.
  • Free agent CB Travis Fisher -- last seen playing for the Ravens -- was arrested early this morning on a charge of driving with a suspended license.
  • Packers fans are mobilizing. They’ve developed a Facebook page to convince President Obama that former Packers OL Fuzzy Thurston deserves a presidential pardon (he owes $1.7 million in back taxes to the IRS).

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: June 24, 2011 10:02 am
Edited on: June 24, 2011 6:57 pm
 

Fuzzy Thurston's Super Bowl ring to be auctioned

F. Thurston apparently owes $1.7 million in back taxes (US Presswire).Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Former Packers OG Fuzzy Thurston, who won Super Bowls with Vince Lombardi in Green Bay in 1966 and 1967, will lose his Super Bowl II ring when the government sells it at an auction to recover part of the $1.7 million the government says he owes in back taxes.

This comes according to the Green Bay Press Gazette, which writes that the government also wants to auction his Super Bowl I ring, as well as the NFL championship jewelry from 1958, 1961, 1962 and 1965. The government, though, apparently hasn’t recovered those items yet.

According to the Press Gazette, the Super Bowl II ring could sell for $20,000.  The Associated Press reports that other rings from Super Bowls I and II have sold in recent years; running back Paul Hornung's Super Bowl I ring fetched about $40,000 in 2002, and former offensive lineman Steve Wright sold his Super Bowl I ring in May for $73,409.

More details via the AP:
Messages left at Thurston's Waupaca home weren't immediately returned. Green Bay lawyer Owen Monfils, who represented Thurston in some of his tax cases, told the Green Bay Press-Gazette he was certain Thurston didn't owe "nearly as much as the government claims."

The tax fight stems from Thurston's post-Packers days, when he and his business partners opened a chain of restaurants. According to a federal complaint, Thurston and the others withheld federal income taxes from employee salaries but failed to turn all the money over to the Internal Revenue Service.

After a court fight, Thurston was ordered to pay about $190,000 in 1984. With interest, the debt now stands at just over $1.7 million, according to court documents.
"We hope to reach out to fans who might wish to purchase the material to return it to Thurston," said Chris Ivy, the director of sports auctions at Heritage Auctions of Dallas.

It’s certainly a sad moment for a former Pro Bowler.

But I like the idea presented by the Boston Globe’s Greg Bedard, who formerly covered the Packers for the Milwaukee paper. Wrote Bedard on Twitter: “It will take about 2 min for a Packers fan to bid on Fuzzy's ring and give it back to him. Favre should do it. Start the healing. Seriously.”

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.



 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com