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Tag:Interviews
Posted on: January 7, 2012 12:35 pm
 

Ocho on Motorola's OCNN, 'scripted' ESPN and Pats

Ochocinco is embracing the "Patriot Way." (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

In 2009, at the Super Bowl in Miami, the OchoCinco News Network (OCNN) "launched." Patriots wide receiver Chad Ochocinco, then with the Bengals, partnered with Motorola to create his own news network, with various NFL players (Ray Rice, Darnell Dockett, Chris Cooley) serving as correspondents.

This year, Chad and Motorola are bringing OCNN to the Super Bowl in Indianapolis, but it will be fans who are the correspondents -- winning a shot to take a trip to the Super Bowl and enjoy media day are one of the many reasons to check out Motorola's Facebook page.

We talked to Chad about OCNN, Wes Welker on Twitter, ESPN (it's "scripted"), the Patriots (they, um, don't care about statistics apparently) and much more below.

Will Brinson: Chad, what's going on?

Chad Ochocinco: What's up Will?

WB: Not much, man. Hey, talk about the contest you've got going on with Motorola and OCNN because I think it's something that'll interest our readers, especially with the idea of working with a media mogul like yourself.

Ochocinco: Basically what I'm doing is instead of what I did last year is have fellow colleagues of mine in the NFL that were in the OCNN. This year I'm flipping it around and the folks who send in videos -- who will probably be journalism majors and other people who love journalism and sports and football itself. And so it'll help springboard whatever else they have going on. And I think it's a great idea to give the fans and those people the opportunity to experience media day at the Super Bowl -- that's the chance of a lifetime, especially for a fan.

WB: Yeah, for sure. Kind of break down what someone has to do to win, and what the responsibilities are for the winner -- do they get to spend media day with Ochocinco?

Ocho: Oh no. He won't be with me. I'm not planning to be doing media day because I plan on playing.

WB: [Laughing] Oh right, sorry man. You'll be getting interviewED.

Ochocinco: Yes, that's correct. The whole point is you put in your 30 second video on why you think you should be chosen and whatever comes to your mind that's creative and then the winner's chosen and after that there will be an itinerary for the winner. When I started doing it, it was new to me -- so this person will go through credentials and the whole nine yards and actually be a part of the media.

WB: Well, that's kind of awesome. I talked to Darrelle Revis and Chris Cooley who were correspondents. Will you have players back again this year?

Ochocinco: You know what? I think I want to use the fans this year. I think the players are good but there are so many people out there that love the media, that want to do broadcast journalism, I think it's really cool that they're into it like that. So to give them a chance to interact not just with the real media but in an atmosphere like the media day at the Super Bowl will be awesome.

WB: Yeah, I agree. And I think the NFL's a tough sport to cover because the sport's so saturated -- there are so many organizations that cover it. And I know when OCNN started people thought of it as "one of Chad's crazy ideas" or whatever. But you guys have done a nice job of keeping it relatively serious. Do you think it can be something that other media companies will respect?

Ochocinco: Yeah it takes a long to get to that point. It takes a long way to get to that point. With the right backing and the right steps and wanting to take it to that serious and take it to the next level, we can get that respect we deserve. But stuff like that takes time. And breaking the stories takes time and getting the trust of the athletes around the NFL to allow them to tell us things before anybody else … but it's possible and we can legitimately compete against ESPN and it's affiliates.

WB: Lemme ask you this -- you're preparing for the playoffs and the Patriots have a bye. How different is the approach in New England versus when you were in Cincinnati?

Ochocinco: I don't want to compare, I can't compare. And I care not really to talk about Cincinnati at all. I'm a Patriot and the Patriots, they win for a reason. So obviously the preparation is what it is and it's been the same way for a reason. Whatever way we do prepare, which I really don't want to get into, is the reason why we win all the time.

WB: Ha, OK. I think that's called "The Patriot Way." People always use the phrase "new season" to describe the playoffs. I know 2011 wasn't your greatest season, statistically speaking, but you seemed to show promise at the end of the year. Do you look at the playoffs as a new season for you as well?

Ochocinco: I have no idea. I do what I'm asked to do. One thing outsiders don't realize: they don't give two sh*ts about stats. They care about one thing winning: that's it. And I've embraced what they've asked me to do and that's it.

WB: Do you think Tom Brady's season has gone under the radar? I know that's weird and I know no one cares about statistics but Brady broke Dan Marino's record too and went over 5,000 yards and no one's talking about it -- is that something you find odd?

Ochocinco: I have no idea, man. I have no idea.

WB: OK … I was just curious because I find it odd. Um, back to the media aspect of stuff, is there something where you're working with OCNN is there something that the mainstream media does -- not wrong -- but that you'd like to see done differently?

Ochocinco: I don't really pay the mainstream media any mind on what they do or don't do. I think OCNN is just refreshing because it's different. For one, it's from players that are still active which makes it a lot more fun especially for those who get their news. Sometimes the mainstream media can be overhyped -- it's about filling the stories, it's like the TMZ of sports if that makes sports. And I think OCNN would be a lot better, hearing it from different views and different personalities.

And it won't be scripted you know? ESPN is so scripted.

WB: Yeah, I don't disagree. It gets old even when it's on in the background -- I'd be interested in something like that, that's more towards the fans and less towards entertainment. Is that what you're going for?

Ochocinco: Exactly, most definitely.

WB: As it turns out, you're Mrs. Brinson's favorite athlete of all-time. She's a big fan of "Ultimate Catch" and wanted me to ask if you've got any more reality shows coming down the pipeline?

Ochocinco: I'm not sure. I'm supposed to be filming with my fiancee in a few weeks. But I'm not sure what's going on with that. Just let her know my fiancee and I are supposed to be filming and right now that's about it.

WB: Ha, will do. Fiancee stuff is totally worthy of reality television. I want to talk to you about Twitter real quick -- your Twitter account is one of the most popular among athletes. How do you stay ahead of the curve in being an athlete on Twitter and engaging fans? Is there a strategy towards it?

Ochocinco: Nah, no strategy. Just having no filter. No filter is what makes it what it is.

WB: And did you play any part in getting Wes Welker on Twitter? He's pretty funny there too.

Ochocinco: Yeah, yeah, of course. He wasn't into it and I got him on two weeks ago and now he can't stop tweeting.

WB: Ha, good stuff man, alright. Well thanks again for taking the time to talk with us and hopefully you'll be interviewed by your own media network, pretty sure that would be a first.

Ochocinco: Alright man take it easy.

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Posted on: August 5, 2010 2:20 pm
Edited on: August 5, 2010 2:36 pm
 

5 Questions (or more) with Jerry Rice

Posted by Andy Benoit

Jerry Rice, the greatest wide receiver of all time will be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame this weekend. We had a chance to chat with the legend. Here's what he had to say.

CBSSports.com: You’re going to the Hall of Fame this week, which means you’ve been out of football five years. So what has been most surprising to you in your post-football life?

Jerry Rice: The most surprising thing after football is that I’m still hungry. I’ve teamed up with Proctor and Gamble (for the Take it to the House program ). I’ve done Dancing with the Stars. The Nationwide (Golf) Tour. Getting ready for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. So, I’m busy, I’m enjoying life and I’m just living each day one at a time.

CBS: Have you had to shift your expectations as a competitor, or have you been able to scratch the competitive itch with these new things?

JR: I miss football. I miss it – I miss it with a passion. When I did Dancing with the Stars, there was a competitive nature there. Same with the Nationwide Tour. Anything I try, I’m always looking for perfection. I never had that ultimate game. I could have so many great things – 10 or 12 receptions, whatever, 20 touchdowns and still it would boil down to missing a block or blowing an assignment or something like that. So, I’m always searching for it (perfection) and hopefully one day I’ll get it.

CBS: You have a son playing at UCLA.

JR: Yeah, my son got redshirted his first year, so I’m hoping to see him on the football field this year.

CBS: Talk about your relationship with your son football-wise. Imagine it’d be both a blessing and a curse to be Jerry Rice’s son and play wide receiver.

JR: You know, I think my son does a great job of dealing with “Ok, yeah, my dad is Jerry Rice, who played for San Francisco and accomplished so many things”, but he’s just trying to be himself and I never try to put pressure on him. More than anything, I just want to support – just like a father. When I go to his ball games, I don’t try to critique him, but if he wants to talk about scenario, I’m willing to give him my input.

CBS: How often does he come to you for advice?

JR: He’ll call me up and say, “Hey Dad, what happens when you get a defensive back that wants to be physical at the line of scrimmage?” And I will tell him, “You have to win at the line. You have to dictate to that defensive back what you want to do. If anything, you have to be aggressive. That was my approach for 20 years, and I think I had some success doing it.”

CBS: You have a lot going on. But we both know, no matter what you do for the rest of your life, people are going to see you as a football legend first. Whenever you meet someone, that’s their image of you. Very few people have that in their life. How do you feel about that?

JR: I feel very fortunate because I was able to play the game for 20 years. That’s a long time. I think it shows my dedication to the game and how I would prepare myself in the offseason. A lot of guys are lucky to play for four years; I was able to exceed that by 16. I just feel honored.

CBS: Do you ever feel like part of you just wants to be treated as Jerry Rice Human Being rather than Jerry Rice Football Legend?

JR: You know what, I’ve never looked at myself as "the football legend". I had an opportunity to live a dream for so many people. I think a lot of guys can relate to me – even a lot of women – because when I stepped on a football field, you could tell there was a lot of appreciation there. If I’m walking through the airport or I’m doing whatever, I have people come up to me and say, “Hey, thank you for bringing so much gratification to my day just watching you play football on television or at the stadium.”

CBS: What’s something about yourself as a football player that you appreciate that other people maybe don’t appreciate – something you never got credit for that you’re proud of?

JR: It’s easy to become complacent, but I never gave in, I was always like a rookie trying to make the team and I continued to work hard. I would go training camp early with the rookies, and I felt like I had to prove myself every year.

CBS: What’s your single greatest accomplishment as a player?

JR: Oh my God. Ah….(laughs)…well, I would say the Super Bowls that we won. That’s why you play the game. Not the records, but having the opportunity to play on that stage and win it – that’s something I’ll never forget.

CBS: Wes Welker is coming back from a knee injury. You came back from a knee injury in the 90s. What’s it going to be like for Welker?

JR: I think with Wes Welker, it’s going to take him a second to gain the confidence he needs to be on the football field. He’s out there practicing right now and he’s probably doing everything. But after I came back, it was all about taking that first hit, being able to step up after that first hit and walk back to the huddle. It’s like “okay, I’m okay, I can go now.” I’m sure he’s waiting and anticipating that first hit, and I hope everything goes well for him.

CBS: Darrelle Revis shutdown a lot of No. 1 receivers last year. If you went up against him in the height of your career, what kind of numbers do you think you would have posted against him?

JR: You know, I never really would predict how many balls I would catch or how many touchdowns I would score. I think it would be the ultimate challenge for me. I enjoyed rivalries like that. Say like the Darrell Greene’s or the Deion Sanders’s. I would just go out there and try to dictate the game, and not wait on him for him to get his hands on me. I would be the aggressor, and hopefully come out with some catches and score a couple touchdowns.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com