Tag:Jeffrey Lurie
Posted on: January 3, 2012 3:03 pm
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Eagles bring back Reid, coaching changes his call

Andy Reid and Michael Vick will get another shot in 2012. (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

This isn't a huge shock, but the Eagles are bringing back Andy Reid, the NFL's longest-tenured coach, for at least one more season.

Jeffrey Lurie, Eagles owner, announced as much (in a lengthy fashion!) during a press conference Tuesday.

"I want to see our team coached by Andy Reid next year and I can't wait," Lurie said. "If our goal is to win title, Andy Reid is our guy."

Lurie also added that any coaching changes are "up to Andy" -- the most obvious decision everyone's wondering about is the possibility of changing defensive coordinators. Juan Castillo was, arguably, more embattled in 2011 than any head coach in the NFL and it won't sit well with the locals if he remains the defensive coordinator, particularly with ex-Eagles coach Steve Spagnuolo now on the free-agent market.

Of course, the Eagles defense was substantially better down the stretch in 2011, but don't think Lurie didn't notice the schedule they had.

In his press conference, Lurie pointed to the Eagles strong close to the season and said that to hold onto a four-game winning streak against teams that didn't make the playoffs would be "fool's gold."

"I think there was a miscalculation of implementing scheme changes in a post-lockout season," Lurie said when pressed about Castillo's status. "Anyone who's known Juan Castillo knows he's an incredibly impressive man. Was he put into a tough situation early? Tough to say."

But Lurie added that the decision to keep or not keep Castillo was completely up to Reid. The only difference, based on Lurie's comments Tuesday, is that Reid would be wise to get his team motivated to play before December this season, otherwise 2011 won't go down as the "most disappointing" season of his career.

Next year will.

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Posted on: August 24, 2010 12:32 pm
 

McNabb gets a few things off his chest

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Washington QB Donovan McNabb has a few interesting things to say in the new edition of GQ .

Here are some of his thoughts (and, of course, my responses in bold ):

On the ridicule he took in 2008 when he admitted he didn’t know that if both teams went scoreless in overtime, the game would end in a tie (for the record, I was at the 13-13 game against the Bengals, and it was hands down, the worst contest featuring professionals I’ve ever seen).

The media wants you to be honest and up front with them, and then when you are, they just throw the dagger at you. "Oh, what was he thinking?" There were a lot of responses from other players who said the same thing I did, and then when the referee tells you, "Hey, you get another five minutes to go after this quarter…" Nobody talks about that.

You're in the game and the ref…?

We're in the game, and we go off on third and out, they're out there, and I'm like, "Hey, we need to get this thing going, how much time is left?" I'm looking at the clock and the ref is like, "We've got another five minutes afer this quarter if no one scores." I didn't think nothing of it, but I did hear it. It was a mistake on my part. I've got to know the rules.


OK, so maybe an official gave him faulty information. But it’s still hard to believe – as it was when he first said it two years ago – that McNabb wouldn’t know a rule as elementary as that. Yes, ties are rare. But still, he should have known that games can actually end that way. He deserved to hear criticism about that.

After he was benched in 2008, how did he and coach Andy Reid repair their relationship?

“I had a meeting set up with Andy and [owner] Jeffrey Lurie after the season. We sat down and talked, and I got everything off my chest from '99 on. It went all the way back to the T.O. situation, it went back to us not winning big games, me being criticized for whatever, leadership, whatever it may be, and how no one in the organization ever stepped up and said anything. They'll say something to you in the building, but not publicly. My feeling was, 'I'm out here getting cut up, where are you? I'm always defending and helping you guys, but where's that support?' I thought it was beneficial, because you can sit there and tell somebody you truly love them, you're a big fan, your family loves you, but what about when we're over here in the hot seat, where are you now?

I agree with him. I think McNabb unfairly was a lightning rod during his time in Philadelphia. It goes back to the booing he received during the 1999 Draft (by the way, from looking at that video, there can’t be anything much lamer than painting your face and wearing shoulder pads during the freakin’ NFL Draft).


Did he puke during Super Bowl XXXIX?

No, at no point did I throw up. I got hit and dumped on my face a couple of times…we lost Todd Pinkston…we all were gassed, and there were a couple of times in the game where I got hit either by [linebacker Teddy (sic)] Bruschi or by [defensive end Richard] Seymour, I had grass in my helmet and maybe I lost my wind a little bit, but nothing to the point where I would come out of the game. People can run that game back and forth and find out that I wasn't throwing up, but I guess it's a sexy topic to talk about.”

The question here: do you take Terrell Owens or Donovan McNabb at his word? Me? I’m going with McNabb.

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Posted on: July 18, 2010 1:35 pm
 

How much power does Andy Reid have?

The Philadelphia Inquirer has an interesting story today, detailing the relationship between Eagles coach Andy Reid and team president Joe Banner.

The good parts of their relationship, as outlined by staff writers Ashley Fox and Mike Jensen:

For 11 years, Reid and Banner have worked together, making the crucial decisions that, for better or worse, have led the Eagles to 118 wins, including 10 in the playoffs. They have constructed teams that have won five NFC East titles and have been to the conference championship game five times and the Super Bowl once.

Neither man is overly generous in divulging the details of the inner workings of their complicated relationship. Both independently insist that they get along, and they point to the longevity of their relationship as proof. If they had internal conflict and strife, they say, they wouldn't still be together.


The more uncomfortable aspects of their relationship:

As the years have passed since the Eagles were in the Super Bowl, a team source said, the balance of power in the front office has shifted away from Reid and back to Banner.

The Eagles' main decision-makers – (owner Jeffrey) Lurie, Banner, Reid, and new general manager Howie Roseman - bend over backward to say that Reid is the one who has final say on all football decisions. It is a fact so frequently stated that it raises a simple question: Is he really?

Is it really Reid who decides who stays, who goes, and how much a player gets paid? He runs the football operations, but Banner negotiates the contracts and manages the salary cap. When a tough decision has to be made - such as trading Donovan McNabb, releasing Brian Westbrook, or not re-signing Brian Dawkins - is it really Reid who makes the decision?

"If you ask me who's running the show, I'd say Joe Banner, without question," said a team source who asked for anonymity because of the sensitivity of the topic. "All along, Joe's the boss. Jeffrey's the owner, Joe's the boss. Everybody knows that.

"When Andy first came here, he had the power. We were winning. It was like a shared type of thing. But guess what? Joe's got all the power again, and that's it."


The question is, though, what happens if the Eagles continue to not win the Super Bowl? Will Banner eventually have to fire Reid in order for Philadelphia to take that next step? I guess that's when we'll see who really has the power.

--Josh Katzowitz

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