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Tag:Jeremy Shockey
Posted on: February 25, 2012 2:51 pm
 

2012 NFL Free Agency: Tight End Rankings

Shiancoe leads what is a fairly unimpressive group of free agent tight ends. (US Presswire)
By Josh Katzowitz

Leading up to the start of free agency on March 13, we're compiling the best 2012 NFL free agents by position. These are the tight ends.

Originally for this post, I listed Jermichael Finley for the No. 1 spot on this list. Obviously, he was an easy call, because he was so obviously the best tight end on the market. Now, though, he’s a signed a two-year deal with the Packers worth about $7.5 million per season, and therefore, the free agent tight end class of 2012 suddenly has grown awfully weak (let’s face it, it wasn’t all that great with Finley on top either).

The best tight ends in the game -- guys like New England’s Rob Gronkowski, New Orleans’ Jimmy Graham, San Francisco’s Vernon Davis and Finley -- are safely secure with their respective teams, and those teams who actually are looking for tight ends will have to draw on a list with very few, if any, top-line playmakers. Considering Gronkowski and Graham are helping to redefine the position, that’s not great news. Nevertheless, here we go.

1. Visanthe Shiancoe

Breakdown: Since catching 56 passes for 566 yards and 11 touchdowns when Brett Favre was throwing to him, Shiancoe’s production has decreased the past two seasons, especially in 2011 when he caught 36 passes for 409 yards and three touchdowns. Since he made $4.5 million last season, it doesn’t seem likely the Vikings will re-sign him. Especially since the Vikings seem high on Kyle Rudolph. But unless Favre is planning to return for another season (and let’s face it, we can never rule out this option), the value of Shiancoe isn’t as high as it once was.

Potential Landing Spots: Giants, Browns

2. Martellus Bennett


Breakdown: Though Bennett doesn’t have impressive receiving numbers, that’s not what he’s called upon to do. Instead, he’ll be one of the more valuable tight ends in free agency because he’s top-notch run blocker. Bennett oftentimes is overshadowed by his teammate Jason Witten, but his worth to the Cowboys is evident every time Bennett steps on the field (it also seems evident, though, that Bennett’s time in Dallas is finished). But in order to get paid tons of money, he needs to show he can catch the ball, and that’s something missing from his arsenal at this point.

Potential Landing Spots: Bears, Broncos, Jets, Bengals

3. Joel Dreessen


Breakdown: Dreessen is a solid tight end, and he’s been an important cog for the Texans as quarterback Matt Schaub, receiver Andre Johnson and running back Arian Foster have turned Houston into a consistent top-10 offense in the past three years. He’s not a big-time pass catcher, but he’s a solid run-blocker (as Foster, Ben Tate and Derrick Ward likely would attest). The Texans would like to keep their two tight end set, but assuming Owen Daniels can stay healthy, Dreessen becomes a little more expendable in Houston.
Fred Davis
Potential Landing Spots: Chiefs, Jets, Giants, Texans, Redskins

4. Fred Davis

Breakdown: He’s actually a pretty good candidate to be franchise-tagged by the Redskins (safety LaRon Landry (and his muscles!) is another candidate), and considering he caught 59 passes for 796 yards in 12 games last year in the best season of his career, Davis is a potential emerging star. Unfortunately for Davis, he was suspended for the final four games of the season for a failed drug test, and if he happens to fail another one, he’d be suspended for a year. So, there’s a little bit of a gray cloud following him around, and teams that need a tight end might shy away from a potential off-the-field problem like that.

Potential Landing Spots: Redskins

5. Jeremy Shockey


Breakdown: It was only four years ago when Shockey was considered an elite tight end, good for about 60 catches, 600 yards and six touchdowns per season from 2004-07. He’s been hurt (literally) by injuries, and after the Saints released him in 2010, he was solid enough  last season in Charlotte (though the team did like the toughness he brought to the squad). Shockey has talked about wanting to play in Miami -- he’s also talked apparently about retiring, though it seems like everybody is denying it at that point -- but with Anthony Fasano already entrenched as the Dolphins tight end, Shockey probably would have to be content to play as the No. 2 tight end. He made $4 million last season, and in order to return to the Panthers to play with tight end Greg Olsen, he’d probably have to take a paycut.

Potential Landing Spots: Dolphins, Giants, Panthers
Shockey

6. John Carlson


Breakdown: Carlson missed the entire season with a torn labrum in his shoulder, so there will be plenty of caution surrounding him, even though he’s caught at least 50 passes in two of his first three seasons in the league. Making matters worse, Carlson said in January that he’s not completely healed, estimating that he was only at 90 percent. “Obviously missing the season is not ideal,” he told the Tacoma News Tribune. “But that was the situation I was in. I feel really good. I didn’t beat my body up over the course of the season and my shoulder is repaired.” Carlson is also a solid run-blocker, and he seems like one of those guys who could move into the top-10 of tight ends around the league.

Potential Landing Spots:Seahawks, Rams

7. Jacob Tamme


Breakdown: Like most everybody inside the Indianapolis franchise, Tamme suffered without Peyton Manning around. Playing in place of the injured Dallas Clark, Tamme caught 67 passes for 631 yards and four touchdowns in 2010. Last year, those numbers dropped to 19 for 177 and one. Which obviously is not the kind of season you want to have in a contract year, but it reflects Tamme’s position on the team and, probably, in the league. He’s a solid backup, the No. 2 tight end in a two-tight end set. He has talent, but it’s unclear how much of that was reflected off Manning. He could be a low-risk, somewhat-high reward guy for the right team.

Potential Landing Spots: Colts, Dolphins, Broncos, Bengals

8. Honorable Mention


Unrestricted free agents: Scott Chandler, Reggie Kelly, Daniel Fells
Restricted free agents: None

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Posted on: February 23, 2012 10:24 pm
 

Rivera says Jeremy Shockey might retire

Ron Rivera isn't sure whether Shockey wants to play next season. (US Presswire)
Eye on Football staff report

INDIANAPOLIS -- There’s little question Jeremy Shockey isn’t the same player he was when he averaged 62 catches per season from 2004-07 with the Giants and was considered one of the best tight ends in the game. But after the Saints cut him before the 2011 season, he signed with the Panthers on a one-year, $4 million contract and played admirably alongside Greg Olsen.

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His 37 catches last year were a career-low, but the fact he played 15 games, matching the most ever during his injury-ravaged career, was a good sign. Now, however, at least one person believes he’s contemplating ending his career after 10 years in the league. 

That was the word from Carolina coach Ron Rivera at Thursday’s media session at the scouting combine.

“It was a great conversation and he just said, 'Well, we'll see,'” Rivera said. “With him, who knows?”

The last time Shockey and Rivera talked was in January after the season ended. But since then, Rivera told Joe Person of the Charlotte Observer that he hasn’t heard an update because Shockey -- who’s either a hero or a scoundrel -- has been traveling abroad.

Panthers general manager Marty Hurney, though, isn't buying it, telling the AP, "We’ve gotten no indication that Jeremy’s considering retirement at this point,” and that, “it’s ultimately a question for Jeremy but all indications we are getting is that he wants to play.”

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Posted on: December 18, 2011 10:07 pm
Edited on: December 18, 2011 10:15 pm
 

Shockey: Texans didn't 'give respect' to anthem

By Will Brinson

Jeremy Shockey played a big role in Carolina's 28-13 victory over the Texans in Reliant Stadium on Sunday, catching a 9-yard touchdown pass. But he made more noise after the game, when Shockey ripped members of the Texans for not showing respect to the National Anthem.

Well, at least in Shockey's opinion anyway -- the Panthers tight end apparently didn't feel like some of the players should've had their hands on by their sides.

"Myself, I was pretty upset they weren't showing respect to America during the national anthem," Shockey said per Scott Fowler of the Charlotte Observer. "There were about 10 players who didn't put their arms across their chests.  This is America. They should at least give respect to America. Maybe they just forgot to do it or something. I don't see how you can forget something like that."

Um, OK? That's just weird, right?

It's not like the Texans players turned the opposite way as the anthem was being sung. And it's not like they waved British flags while the music was playing.

They simply stood there without putting their hand on their hearts. Good for Shockey if he's able to use it as motivation later during the game, but there's really no reason to rant about it -- unprovoked -- to reporters afterwards.

For what it's worth, Shockey took to Twitter after the game to apologize, so clearly he feels bad about the comments.

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Posted on: November 7, 2011 5:20 pm
Edited on: November 7, 2011 5:33 pm
 

Survey says: Vick NFL's most disliked player

Fantasy players might love Vick but the general public does not. (Getty Images)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

It's all about perspective. Looking through the prism of fantasy football, Eagles quarterback Michael Vick is probably one of the NFL's most popular players. In real life, where there are no points for total passing yards, Vick is the league's least liked player, at least according to the latest public surveys from Neilson and E-Poll Market Research, which tracks the public's perception of athletes and celebrities.

Details via Forbes.com:
Vick has clearly made some public reparations over the past two years with his strong play on the field and gentlemanly behavior off of it. But these things have a way of taking time....

Why the continued hostility toward Vick? Nielsen Sports VP Stephen Master chalks it up to the scientific sample that mirrors the entire U.S. population, not just hardcore football fans. Casual fans that know Vick’s name primarily through his dog fighting legal circus naturally tend to focus on the negative. Women, for example, view Vick negatively at a 70% clip, compared to 50% for men.
Turns out, the public has little patience for law-breakers (or perceived law-breakers), in general. Plaxico Burress and Ben Roethlisberger were among the top vote-getters. Also unpopular: whiners and quitters; Vince Young, Carson Palmer and Jay Cutler were disliked for reasons having solely to do with football.

Young because of his rocky relationship with then-Titans head coach Jeff Fisher, Palmer for retiring until the Bengals traded him to the Raiders, and Cutler for the injury he suffered during last season's NFC Championship game. (Apparently, Cutler didn't appear injured enough for some folks.) “There was a feeling Cutler quit on his team,” Master says, “He took a lot of abuse.”

Yes, yes he did.

Other names to make the list: Albert Haynesworth, Chad Ochocinco, Tony Romo, and Jeremy Shockey.

Sorta surprising that nobody from the Ravens made the list, though the irony of Palmer being the Raiders' most disliked player more than makes up for it.

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Posted on: October 5, 2011 11:17 am
Edited on: October 6, 2011 4:59 pm
 

Film Room: Panthers vs. Saints preview

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit



The Saints are 3-1 but it’s the 1-3 Panthers creating most of the chatter. Or, Cam Newton creating the chatter. Through a quarter of his rookie season, the No. 1 overall pick is, in a word, sensational. But obviously not perfect. The Panthers are still dwelling in the basement of the NFC South.

Here’s a comprehensive look at Newton and his club as they head into their first divisional showdown of the season.



1. How good is he, really?
Through four games, Newton has far exceeded all expectations. Remarkably, this includes expectations about his physical talents. We knew the 6’5”, 245-pound Auburn Tiger was an athletic monster, but rarely are quarterbacks still athletic monsters once they reach the NFL. Newton has been a productive runner, both with power and speed.

He’s a poor man’s Vick when it comes to eluding tacklers and a poor man’s Roethlisberger when it comes to shedding them. That’s a rich combination considering no other quarterback truly exhibits any of these traits (save for maybe Josh Freeman shedding defenders).

Most impressive, however, is that Newton has not leaned on his athleticism. Operating almost exclusively out of shotguns, he’s been a willing and poised statuesque passer who willingly works through his progressions from the pocket. His decisions are usually capped off by a bullet either downfield, outside the numbers (he has the uncanny arm strength to stretch the field both horizontally and vertically) or, if need be, underneath.

For the most part, Newton’s decisions have been good. He has faced an aggressive blitzing defense in Arizona, a classic 3-4 press defense in Green Bay (playing without Tramon Williams, the Packers kept Charles Woodson outside and blitzed far less often than usual that game) and, most recently, a classic Cover 2 defense in Chicago. He posted a legit 370-plus yards passing against all three of them.

The proof that it’s not all daisies and roses is that Newton also threw crucial interceptions in all three games and came away with a loss. He’s still a rookie and still prone to the occasional blunder. The blunders have been far less frequent than anyone expected, but they’ve been costly nevertheless.

2. Panthers dual tight ends
We assumed that with tight ends Jeremy Shockey and Greg Olsen, Panthers offensive coordinator Rob Chudzinski would craft a dink-and-dunk, run-first system. Indeed, the Panthers have kept two tight ends on the field a majority of the time, but often, at least one of them (usually Olsen) has split out, serving essentially as a No. 3 receiver.

This poses serious personnel issues for defenses. Leave your base three-linebacker unit on the field and risk getting burned through the air (Shockey and Olsen have been superb downfield route runners the first four weeks). Use your nickel personnel and you risk getting run on by a team that always has a top-10 running back on the field.

The Saints are one of the few defenses that have an answer for this: strong safety Roman Harper. He is their second best run defender (behind Jonathan Vilma) and a demon in the box. He’s versatile enough to play press man coverage (he’s not particularly good at it, but Gregg Williams feels comfortable using him sporadically in this capacity) or blitz (3.5 sacks on the season).
 
Expect the Panthers in Week 5 to continue to be pass-first with their tight ends. And expect the Saints to not simply react to this, but rather, to attack by changing up what they do with Harper throughout the game in order to get Newton thinking.

3. Running Impact
Newton is the first quarterback since Vick to pose a veritable threat as a runner (Vince Young can’t be counted as a running threat quarterback because he was such a limited passer that defenses could get away with putting nine in the box against him; not a chance that happens against Newton). Having a running threat under center does wonders for your rushing attack.

The Panthers have all the resources to pound teams on the ground – DeAngelo Williams and Jonathan Stewart are an excellent duo, center Ryan Kalil can lock defenders at both the first and second level, left tackle Jordan Gross is a Pro Bowler and right tackle Jeff Otah flashed his old power against Chicago last week. But for whatever reason, Chudzinski has not gone in that direction. Carolina is averaging 25.5 rushing attempts per game, tied for 18th in the NFL.

Chudzinski would be wise to change this. The threat that Newton poses really opens things up. We saw this on the third play of the game against Chicago last week:


4. What Newton will see from Saints D
The Saints have one of the most aggressive defenses in football – both in terms of execution and presnap disguise. That has a lot to do with the trust Gregg Williams has in his secondary. Jabari Greer is one of the best ball-man corners in the game. Patrick Robinson had a rough Week 1 at Green Bay but has come on the last few outings (he was phenomenal at Jacksonville).

Playmaker Tracy Porter was eased back into action last week – he missed two games with a calf injury – and should see more snaps Sunday. When you factor in free safety Malcom Jenkins’ range, the Saints clearly have the resources to handle a Panthers’ wide receiving corps that is underwhelming outside of Steve Smith.

Dealing with the tight ends might be an issue, but Roman Harper’s versatility could cause Newton to question that matchup at times. How will Newton react when he sees Harper leave Olsen or Shockey and blitz? The simple answer would be, “He’ll throw to Olsen or Shockey”. But if you and I can predict this, so can Gregg Williams.

The Saints are one of the best green dog blitzing defenses in the league. (A green dog blitz is when a linebacker has a running back man-to-man, sees that the running back is staying in to pass protect and so he goes after the quarterback in response.) These blitzes can be hard to recognize because they come unexpectedly and late in the action.
 
When blitzing is not involved, Carolina’s offensive line can contain a Saints pass-rush that has been hit-or-miss early this season (the return of end Will Smith certainly helps). Thus, expect Gregg Williams to go after Newton and get him guessing before the snap. Many of Williams’ blitzes come out of nickel personnel packages. The Saints used their nickel later in the game against the Texans to counter the receiving impact of Houston’s two tight ends (Owen Daniels and James Casey). Don’t be surprised if they refer to their nickel early against the Panthers’ two-tight end offense.

5. The other side of the ball
The Saints have remade their offense this season. It now runs through Darren Sproles and Jimmy Graham. Sproles has been better for the Saints than Reggie Bush ever was (much better, in fact). That could be in part because Sproles doesn’t yet draw the attention that Bush drew. But more than anything, it’s because he has lightning quick feet and an understanding for how to create and exploit spacing in both the run and pass game.

Graham is the dynamic athlete we all knew he’d be after his 2010 debut. It just so happens that the ex-power forward is developing much quicker than expected. He’s a mismatch for any linebacker, has the size to out-position defensive backs and has better hands than Robert Meachem (who is now the fourth option in this pass offense, behind Sproles, Graham and, when healthy, Marques Colston).

Panthers strong safety Charles Godfrey has been stellar in coverage this season and can compete with Graham, but the Panther linebackers (who are really missing Jon Beason) will have trouble with Sproles. Carolina’s best hope is to get pressure on Brees early in the down.

Defensive ends Charles Johnson and Greg Hardy are capable of embarrassing New Orleans’ athletic but grossly unreliable tackles Jermon Bushrod and Charles Brown. But Brees knows this and is also capable of adjusting.

So who will win? Check our Week 5 NFL expert picks for all the games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: August 29, 2011 9:31 pm
 

Jeremy Shockey saves choking Ben Hartsock

ShockeyPosted by Josh Katzowitz

Panthers tight end Ben Hartsock is real thankful for Jeremy Shockey today. That’s because Shockey came to the quick rescue of Hartsock when he began choking while eating lunch at the team facility.

Hartsock was eating pork tenderloin when a piece of the meat got caught in his throat, as the National Football Post recounts. Hartsock drank water to try to dislodge the obstruction, but it soon became clear to teammates that he couldn’t breathe.

“He started to go to the bathroom and I don’t know if he collapsed, but he couldn’t breathe,” agent Mike McCartney told the NFP. “Some new guy came and tried to give him the Heimlich. It didn’t work. Then, Shockey hit him in the back pretty hard and out came the meat. The Panthers told me it was really scary.

“Ben told me, ‘Shockey came over and gave me the Heimlich Maneuver and saved my life.’ He was in good spirits and he’s real thankful for Shockey.”

So, there you go: Jeremy Shockey, hero.

But my favorite part of the story (you know, other than the fact Hartsock is alive and breathing)? It’s what the Panthers repeatedly said to Hartsock at practice afterward: “Don’t choke, Hartsock.” Hopefully it’s a zinger that Hartsock and Shockey can laugh at for a long time.

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Posted on: July 28, 2011 6:20 pm
Edited on: July 28, 2011 9:17 pm
 

TE Olsen traded to Panthers for draft pick

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

It was just a few hours ago when we told you that the Bears had put TE Greg Olsen on the trading block, as agent Drew Rosenhaus tweeted that Chicago was willing to be very “reasonable” in who they got for swapping Olsen.

The Panthers have taken the Bears up on the deal.

The Chicago Tribune is reporting that Olsen is on his way to Carolina in exchange for a player (not likely named Steve Smith) and for an undisclosed draft pick.

Olsen caught 41 passes last year for 404 yards and five touchdowns, and he’ll join a crowded tight end group in Carolina with Jeremy Shockey and Ben Hartsock already on the roster.

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Posted on: March 11, 2011 10:50 pm
 

Hot Routes 3.11.11 shortened special (thanks CBA)

Posted by Will Brinson



Got a link for the Hot Routes? Hit us up on Twitter (@CBSSportsNFL).


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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com