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Tag:Joey Porter
Posted on: February 29, 2012 12:33 pm
Edited on: February 29, 2012 2:28 pm
 

2012 NFL Free Agency: Linebacker Rankings

Fletcher, at 37, might not have many options other than returning to Washington. (US Presswire)
By Josh Katzowitz

Leading up to the start of free agency on March 13, we're compiling the best 2012 NFL free agents by position. These are the linebackers.

While there are a ton of free agent linebackers about to come on the market -- I’ve counted approximately 80 -- there doesn’t seem to be many surefire game-changers in the bunch. London Fletcher, vastly underrated in Washington, is one such player, but other than him, you’ve mostly got solid guys who can be contributors to whichever team signs them.

Some of the better free agent linebackers have been taken off the board already, as D’Qwell Jackson has re-signed with Cleveland while Ahmad Brooks agreed to return to San Francisco. Here are the rest of those who probably will try out their fortunes on the market.

1a. Mario Williams


Breakdown: Though we have Williams as the No. 1 defensive end available, we have to give him some love on the linebacker list, as well. Simply because in Wade Phillips' 3-4 scheme, Williams was an outside linebacker. He only played five games for the Texans last year before tearing his pectoral muscle, but with five sacks, he also proved he can be successful in a 3-4 defense, meaning every team in the league should be thinking about Williams' worth. We thought he might struggle to find his balance in the first year of Phillips' scheme, but, as a linebacker, Williams is pretty damn good also.

Possible Landing Spots: Texans, Jaguars, Seahawks, Titans

1b. London Fletcher


Breakdown: Fletcher is one of those players who, unless you’re paying close attention, somehow seems to rack up the tackle numbers -- and you’re not really sure how. And before you know it, he’s leading the league with 166 takedowns, like last year.  In fact, Fletcher has recorded at least 116 tackles every year since 2001, and he’s started 224-straight games. The problem with Fletcher is that he’s 37, and you have to wonder how long his durability will hold up -- as well as his penchant for making scores of tackles every season. That shouldn’t matter, however, because it sounds like he wants to return to Washington and that the Redskins feel the same way. “We want our captain back,” Redskins general manager Bruce Allen said earlier this month. The feeling apparently is mutual.

Potential Landing Spots: Redskins

Tulloch might be a good fit in Philadelphia because he knows how to play in the wide nine. (US Presswire)

2. Stephen Tulloch


Breakdown: After a solid 2008-10 with the Titans (the dude had 160 tackles in 2010), Tennessee let the Lions take away Stephen Tulloch for 2011. After recording 111 tackles, two interceptions and five passes defended last year, Detroit would like to keep him. It’ll likely cost the Lions much more than the one-year, $3.25 million deal they paid Tulloch last year. More importantly for the Lions, though, is locking up defensive end Cliff Avril, and you have to wonder if the Lions will want to shell out that much money to two defensive players. One good option for Tulloch might be the Eagles. Considering Tulloch played for years with Jim Washburn, who installed the wide nine scheme in Philadelphia last year, Tulloch would be comfortable in that system. Besides, the Eagles linebackers last year were pretty horrible, and Tulloch would be a big upgrade. Wherever he lands, one can only hope that Tulloch gets another chance to Tebow in front of Tebow.

Possible Landing Spots: Lions, Buccaneers, Eagles

3. Anthony Spencer


Breakdown: He’s pretty much the definition of one of those solid linebackers I wrote about before, and the Cowboys don’t fancy losing him to free agency. There has been speculation that the team could place the franchise tag on him, but if not, at least one Dallas reporter has speculated that Spencer could land a Chris Canty-like deal (a six-year, $42 million contract signed in 2009). The Cowboys might be averse to giving him such a long deal, because he hasn’t necessarily lived up to his first-round draft pick expectations. Spencer’s representatives and the Cowboys were scheduled to meet at the scouting combine, and if they can’t come to a long-term agreement, Dallas might just have to grit its teeth and tag him.

Possible Landing Spots:Cowboys, Dolphins

4. Curtis Lofton


Breakdown: For the past three years, Lofton has been a tackling machine, accumulating at least 118 (including 147 in 2011), and it’s clear the Falcons want to re-sign him. But when Atlanta general manager Thomas Dimitroff says that negotiations between the team and Lofton are “amicable,” it strikes kind of a weird tone (or is that just me?). And maybe the Falcons won’t be terrified if Lofton leaves. As the Atlanta Journal Constitution wrote last week, “There’s growing sentiment that he’s a liability against the pass. The question thus becomes: Would you pay $8 million a year for a two-down linebacker?” Lofton might want more than that. Reportedly, Lofton is asking or a four-year deal worth $36 million.

Possible Landing Spots: Falcons, Eagles, Browns

5. David Hawthorne

Breakdown: With Hawthorne, you pretty much know what you’re getting. He’s good for about 110 tackles a season, five passes defended or so, and an interception or three. But it sounds like the Seahawks have a higher priority to sign running back Marshawn Lynch and defensive end Red Bryant than inking Hawthorne to a new deal. Hawthorne is only 26 years old, and he’s solid across the board. But maybe more than most of the other linebackers on the list, there’s not a great chance for him to return to his old team. The one caveat to that: now that Leroy Hill is facing another drug charge, that might open up Seattle’s interest in Hawthorne again.

Possible Landing Spots: Bears, Cowboys, Seahawks

6. Jarret Johnson


Breakdown: The Ravens, at some point soon, might have to make a choice between whether they want Johnson or Jameel McClain (see below) to return to Baltimore for 2012. General manager Ozzie Newsome had said he wants to keep both, but that will be tough for the club to accomplish. So, if you’re Newsome, who is the priority between Johnson and McClain? Well, McClain had more tackles (84-56) last season  but less sacks (Johnson had 2.5 to McClain’s 1), and the Baltimore Sun predicts the Ravens have a better chance of retaining Johnson. He is, though, four years older, which might mean Baltimore will actually go harder after McClain. “I’d like to fit in again here,” Johnson said last month, via the team’s official website. “But unfortunately this is a business and sometimes business decisions [have] got to be made. I hope to be back. I’d love to retire a Raven, but we’ll see.”

Possible Landing Spots: Ravens, Colts

7. Jameel McClain


Breakdown: At 26, McClain is a young talent who likely will command a large salary (moreso than Jarret Johnson (see above)). It doesn’t sound like there’s a great chance for the Ravens to keep him.

Possible Landing Spots: Ravens, Colts, Eagles

8. Honorable Mentions

Unrestricted: Barrett Ruud, Chase Blackburn, Clark Haggans, Joey Porter, Andra Davis, Manny Lawson, Geno Hayes, Wesley Woodyard, Dan Connor

Restricted: Dannell Ellerbe, Aaron Maybin

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Posted on: April 18, 2011 12:13 pm
Edited on: April 19, 2011 6:00 pm
 

Offseason Checkup: Arizona Cardinals

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

L. Fitzgerald could walk into free agency at the end of next season (US Presswire).

Eye on Football's playing doctor for every NFL team with our Offseason Check-ups



Let’s see, when your choices to fill the starting quarterback spot boil down to Derek Anderson vs. Matt Leinart, you know your season is pretty much screwed before it even begins. And that’s pretty much what happened with the Cardinals last year (though, to be fair, quarterback was far from the only problem in Arizona).

I bet you don’t remember this, though. After beating the Saints in Week 5, Arizona actually was 3-2 before falling through the floor. The only player worth a darn on offense was WR Larry Fitzgerald, and it seems like most of the defense underachieved (most notably, LB Joey Porter). Suffice to say, it was not a good year for the Cardinals.




Best player is unhappy

Fitzgerald, the only bonafide superstar on this team, was visibly frustrated last year with the offense (and the quarterback play in particular), and even though he somehow caught 90 passes for 1,137 yards last season, the Cardinals front office has to convince him that Arizona has a blueprint for the future. Otherwise, Fitzgerald could walk away after his contract is up after the 2011 season.




1. QUARTERBACK
This is an easy spot to pick on, because if you look at the current roster of QBs, here’s who you find: Anderson (consistently terrible throughout his career, and he doesn’t like taking questions about laughing on the sideline during losses), Max Hall (probably doesn’t have the skill set to start in the NFL), John Skelton (perhaps a little potential) and Richard Bartel (no idea who this is). Missouri’s Blaine Gabbert has a pretty good shot at landing in Arizona, and if he doesn’t, the Cardinals could elect to go after Marc Bulger.

2. RUNNING BACK
The Cardinals tried two years ago, selecting RB Beanie Wells in the first round, but that hasn’t worked out so well. Wells had a tough time staying healthy last season, and Tim Hightower had a big problem with fumbles. In fact, Arizona was last in the league in rushing offense – which kinda doesn’t help the quarterback. I actually think LaRod Stephens-Howling is a pretty good player, but I’m not sure he’s a featured back kind of guy.

3. LINEBACKER
Although the defense ranked No. 29 last season, I like the three players across the line (NT Dan Williams and DEs Darnell Dockett and Calais Campbell), and the secondary could be very, very good. But the linebackers are brutal. Texas A&M’s Von Miller would be a blessing for the Cardinals, who pick fifth, but he might not be around by then. Besides, Gabbert might be the more exciting (though not the safer) pick.




It’s hard to believe the Cardinals are only three seasons removed from playing in the Super Bowl, and it’s hard to imagine them getting back there anytime soon. If only Arizona had a good quarterback, a dependable running back, a second WR, a decent offensive line, and some players in the LB corps, the Cardinals would have a good chance of getting back to .500.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed

Posted on: January 7, 2011 2:34 pm
Edited on: January 7, 2011 2:37 pm
 

Cardinals making change at defensive coordinator

Posted by Andy Benoit

On Thursday, Arizona Cardinals head coach Ken WhisenhunB. Davis (US Presswire) announced that he had fired defensive coordinator Bill Davis.

"I have great respect for Billy as a coach and a friend, but when you go 5-11 you're forced to make some tough decisions, and this is one of them," Whisenhunt said.

Whisenhunt has always had the stomach for changing defensive coordinators. He fired Clancy Prendergast shortly after the Cardinals’ Super Bowl appearance.

The Cardinals defense ranked 31st in yards allowed this past season. But in Davis’ first year, when the team had inside linebacker Karlos Dansby and free safety Antrel Rolle, the Cardinals were 14th in yards.

But, as safety Kerry Rhodes told Kent Somers of the Arizona Republic, "Whenever you're the head guy you're going to catch flak. You could see (the firing) coming."

Whisenhunt will likely go outside the organization to find Davis’ replacement. Many believe that his former colleague and current Steelers linebacker coach Keith Butler is the front runner. Upon taking the Cardinals job in ’07, Whisenhunt requested to interview Butler but was denied by the Steeler brass. In ’09 Butler was unable to interview because of hip surgery. (If Whisenhunt surprises by promoting someone from within the organization, expect him to tap secondary coach Teryl Austin.)

Butler is obviously erudite in the 3-4 scheme, which the Cardinals ostensibly prefer (they spent a first-round pick on a true nose tackle, Dan Williams). Whoever gets the job will need more firepower at the outside linebacker position. Joey Porter underachieved as the team’s headlining free agent pickup. His counterpart, Clark Haggans, is only good for about five sacks a year. There is little to no depth behind both guys.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: October 30, 2010 7:04 pm
 

Week 8 injury report analysis Part III

Posted by Andy Benoit

Packers @ Jets

The Jets used the bye week to get healthy. C Nick Mangold (shoulder), OLB Calvin Pace (foot) and CB Darrelle Revis (hamstring) are probable, though all have been deemed 100 percent by Rex Ryan.

Packers DT Ryan Pickett (ankle) did not participate in practice all week. Pickett tried to fight through the injury against the Vikings last week but was utterly ineffective on only six plays. Former DE and current OLB Cullen Jenkins (calf) is also iffy. The loss of either Picket or Jenkins would be significant for a front seven that, in part because of other injuries, has become very average against the run.

Titans @ Chargers

Vince Young is back after sitting out last week nursing a sprained knee. WR Justin Gage is also back after missing three games with a hamstring. It will be interesting to see how the Titans incorporate the veteran starter back into the offense. While Gage was away, youngster Kenny Britt and Damian Williams really stepped up. Tennessee’s best defensive lineman, Tony Brown, is out with a knee injury.

It’s a little ironic that on the week where Vincent Jackson finally signs, the Chargers find themselves depleted at wide receiver. Starters Malcom Floyd and Legedu Naanee are both doubtful with hamstring problems. Craig Davis also missed part of the week’s practices with sore ribs. He’s questionable. You wonder if A.J. Smith now regrets suspending Jackson three games.
Chargers ILB Brandon Siler is questionable with a foot; OLB Larry English (foot) remains out.

Bucs @ Cardinals

The Bucs will be without starting C Jeff Faine (quad) and RT Jeremy Trueblood (knee). And they just cut starting LG Keydrick Vincent. Thus, sixth-round rookie Ted Larsen and undrafted third-year pro James Lee will start up front. That’s not ideal for sparking what has been an anemic rushing attack. Rookie DT Brian Price, whose NFL career is off to a slow start thus far, is out with a pelvis injury. Every other significant Bucs player had full participation in practice this week.

For the Cardinals, OLB Clark Haggans is questionable with a groin. OLB Joey Porter also has a sore groin, though he’s probable. DT Alan Branch, who is coming off a rare two-sack game against Seattle, was limited in practice with a back injury. The Cardinals hope wideout Steve Breaston (knee) can join Early Doucet (groin) back on the field this week. Both are listed as questionable and have been practicing.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .

Posted on: October 22, 2010 2:36 pm
 

Hot Routes 10.22.10 Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight!

Hot Routes

Posted by Andy Benoit

Titans players seem to have a knack for getting in serious bar fights but not charged with a crime. First Vince Young, and now Kenny Britt. The difference, of course, is Britt’s incident did not happen in May – it happened at 1:45 am Friday morning on the week of a game.

Speaking of the Titans…it’s now been one year since they started 0-6. Since then, they’ve gone 12-4 and, statistically speaking, been one of the most solid teams in all of football.

Chad Ochocinco sent T-shirts to some of the Falcons players this week. So, Roddy White responded with this homemade video. Guerilla trash talk, gotta love it.


The Chiefs will get defensive end Tyson Jackson back Sunday. The No. 3 overall pick of the 2009 draft has been out since Week 1 with a knee injury.


Joey Porter insists he will have double-digit sacks when all is said and done. So far, Arizona’s $5.2 million outside linebacker has one.


The Ravens don’t agree with those who say their offensive is conservative.


Interesting article about how the Bills passed on Haloti Ngata in the 2006 draft. (They took Dante Whitner instead.)


The Panthers have benched right guard Mackenzy Bernadeau. Geoff Schwartz will move from right tackle to Bernadeau’s spot. Stepping in at right tackle will be second-year player Gary Williams, making his first NFL start. Bernadeau understood: “They said I’ve been playing pretty well, but not to the best of my ability. And I know I wasn’t. Little things were holding me back, nothing too crazy,” he said. “Right now we just need a win and we’ve got to make some changes, and that’s one of them.”


Redskins veteran leader Phillip Daniels is traveling to Chicago earlier than the rest of the team so that he can attend his son’s high school football senior night. Daniels left the Bears in 2003 but his family stayed in town. Daniels’ son, DeVaris Daniels, is a defensive back/wide receiver and has committed to Notre Dame.


Thanks to wrist surgery, Nick Barnett is now learning how to be a southpaw.


The Dolphins are making a push for stadium improvements. For the second time in seven months, they’re trying to drum up support for some public funding.


The Bucs are practicing at Raymond James Stadium on Friday because Raheem Morris wants his players to get more familiar with being in their end zone. It’s not a pure metaphor – they’re literally spending more time on that part of the field.


The Wall Street Journal says the numbers suggest the 2-4 San Diego Chargers might be the greatest bad team in NFL history.


Mathias Kiwanuka expects to play against this season, but WHEN, exactly, is unclear.

Chris Kluwe offered some unique analysis on the league’s illegal hit policies.


For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed

Posted on: October 12, 2010 4:35 pm
Edited on: October 12, 2010 5:37 pm
 

Top Ten With a Twist: Overpaid players

J. Delhomme is making more than $19 million this year. He's probably not worth it (Getty). Posted by Josh Katzowitz

I saw a stunning stat on Twitter as the Browns mucked their way to a loss against the Falcons this past Sunday. It had to do with how much money QB Jake Delhomme is pulling in this year. Naturally, the number is ridiculous, as I’ll detail further in the below paragraphs.

But it gave me the idea for the newest edition of Top Ten With a Twist. Who are the most overpaid players in the game today? By overpaid, I mean the players who are either busts or has-beens or guys who simply found an owner who decided that spending tens of millions of dollars on a problem child was the way to go.

I’m not talking about rookies like Sam Bradford. Of course, the first-round NFL draft picks are overpaid, but at this point, I’m not including them on this list (it’d be an entirely new list altogether). Instead, I’m including guys like Delhomme – either guys who have been around the league for a while who are getting a good payday because they were good at one time, or guys who were supposed to be good but haven’t shown it.

Be forewarned: the salaries we’ll discuss might make you a little nauseous. So, pop a Dramamine or two and let’s go.

10. Eli Manning, QB, Giants: Before last season, you’ll recall, Manning signed a seven-year deal worth $106.9 million that pays him an average of about $15 million from 2009 through 2015, and that doesn’t include his endorsement deals. There’s little doubt that Manning is the most important player on the team, but is he really worth the money? I’m not saying Manning isn’t good, because he is a good quarterback. But he’s not an elite top-five kind of guy, and he’s making elite top-five kind of money. For what it’s worth, he currently makes more than his brother, Peyton (and his oldest brother, Cooper, for that matter).

9. Marvin Austin, DT, Tar Heels: OK, we’re getting a little ahead of ourselves if we’re talking NFL. But look at the damage Austin – well, the recruitment of Austin – has done already and look how much money it’s cost the people around him. Austin apparently accepted gifts and other improper benefits from agents (the NCAA determined it was worth between $10,000-$13,000). As a result, Austin was kicked off the team Monday and UNC teammates Robert Quinn and Greg Little have been made permanently ineligible, the NCAA has brought up academic violations, coach Butch Davis might get fired, the Tar Heels football program has been set back in a major way, and the school in general has taken a hit to its reputation. That’s quite a bit of money Austin indirectly is costing everybody, and as one of my colleague says, “And he hasn’t even played yet!”

8. Joey Porter, LB, Cardinals: Blame the team in this case instead of the player. The team which gave a 33-year-old LB a three-year deal for $17.5 million which could max out at $24.5 million. Porter was coming off a pretty good season in Miami in 2009, where he recorded nine sacks in 14 games. This year, though, has been a rough one. He’s recorded 16 solo tackles, good for 10th on the team, and he’s only recorded one sack through the team’s first five games. No doubt that Porter has had a standout career, but there’s also little doubt that he’s not the player he once was. He’s still making good bank for it, though.

7. Brandon Jacobs, RB, Giants: Perhaps if Jacobs had been signed as a discus hurler, his four-year, $25 million extension that he signed before last season would have made sense. Instead, Jacobs is solely a RB who’s gained 172 yards in the team’s first five games and who’s lost his starting position (for the record, in 2009, his attempts rose from the 2008 season, but his yards gained fell and his touchdowns dropped from 15 to five). Plus, you had the throwing-his-helmet-into-the-crowd incident at the Indianapolis game. The $15 million he was guaranteed doesn’t look so good now.

6. Darrius Heyward-Bey, WR, Raiders: We’re not discussing rookies in this list, but that doesn’t mean we can’t talk about second-year players (or players that are still in college, I suppose). For some reason, the Raiders took him with the seventh pick in the 2009 Draft, and then they blew up the slotting system by awarding him a five-year contract worth $38.25 million ($23.5 million guaranteed). He promptly went out and caught nine passes in 11 games. This year, he’s got 11 catches through five games, so that’s an improvement. Good thing the Raiders took Heyward-Bey instead of, say, Jeremy Maclin.

5. Tyson Jackson, DE, Chiefs: He was the third overall pick of the 2009 Draft, and while he wasn’t great last year – hell, he wasn’t even decent – he wasn’t the worst bust in the history of the Draft. It could be argued that he wasn’t nearly as bad as Glenn Dorsey, the Chiefs 2008 first-round pick who had tallied exactly two sacks in his first two years. But Dorsey is playing better this year, while Jackson – 38 tackles last year but zero sacks – has been out with a sprained MCL. At this point, he’s a big disappointment.

A. Smith still hasn't won a starting job with Cincinnati (Getty). 4. Andre Smith, OL, Bengals: The one thing I’ll always remember about Smith – aside from the whole running-the-40-shirtless-at-his-pro
-day-only-to-be-mocked-unmercifully
thing – is that after he signed his contract for $21 million on HBO’s Hard Knocks, his agent turned to him and said, “Congratulations. You’re a millionaire now.” Yep, that’s pretty much how he’s acted the past two years in Cincinnati. He’s been overweight, and his work ethic has been questioned. He only played in six games last season, starting one, and he still can’t be used as an every-play offensive lineman. Dennis Roland, who’s much less talented than Smith, has been starting ahead of him.

3. Matt Cassel, QB, Chiefs: One good year can get you a big contract, and for proof, look no further than Cassel. In 2008, he led the Patriots to a 11-5 record while completing 63.4 percent of his passes for 3,693 yards, 21 touchdowns and 11 interceptions. After New England QB Tom Brady returned, Cassel signed with the Chiefs for a six-year, $63 million deal with $28 million guaranteed. Not bad for a career backup in the NFL and in college at USC. This year, he’s completed 54.7 percent of his passes for 650 yards (about 162.5 yards per game), four TDs and three INTs. That’s not much production for a guy being paid a lot of money.

2. Albert Haynesworth, NT, Redskins: You thought I was going to put Haynesworth No. 1, didn’t you? While we’ve spent so much time on Haynesworth and the $100 million contract and the tens of millions of dollars of guaranteed money, he’s begun to play better lately (he sat out this past week, though, after the death of his brother). Surely, he’s not worth the money, but considering some thought he could have been released from the Washington squad at this point, the fact he’s still playing is sort of a win. Sort of. Still, it’s hard to overlook the fact he’s made six tackles and recorded exactly zero sacks this season.

1. Jake Delhomme, QB, Browns: Ah, the impetus for this column in the first place. Delhomme, between what the Browns and his former team, the Panthers, are paying him, is making $19.7 million this season. Doesn’t that number just absolutely blow you away? He started the first game of the season but was lost for three games with an ankle injury. Then, he backed up Seneca Wallace against the Falcons on Sunday, replaced him when he went out with an ankle injury and then reinjured his own ankle. He’s likely to be out for a while now. On the year, he’s 33 of 60 for 324 yards, one touchdown and four interceptions. Not real good. Not a real good return on Cleveland’s money either.

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Posted on: July 28, 2010 3:07 pm
 

The worst free agent moves this season

The Sporting News breaks down the top-eight worst free agent signings this year, and it’s no surprise that the Bengals-Antonio Bryant marriage (and the four-year, $28 million dowry that goes with it) tops the list.

Already, there’s been plenty of talk across the national airwaves today about Terrell Owens and Bryant and Chad Ochocinco – I’ve already done video for CBSSports.com, and radio stations in Albuquerque and Edmonton have been in touch – and in this case, I agree with Mike Florio when he writes, “… (W)ith Bryant potentially the odd man out when the team employs two-receiver sets, it made no sense for the Bengals to pay him so much money so early in free agency. Already rumblings have emerged Bryant could be cut, but with $7.85 million already in hand, it's unlikely Cincinnati will dump him before 2011.”

I still don’t completely understand why the Bengals signed Owens. I don’t know if it’s a problem with Bryant’s knee, though coach Marvin Lewis is adamant that the knee isn’t the reason why Owens was signed. But considering the Bengals signed Bryant instead of Owens earlier this year, there has to be some reason the Cincinnati front office decided to invest in Owens.

Among the moves that also draw the ire of Florio: QB Jake Delhomme to Cleveland, RB LaDainian Tomlinson to the Jets and LB Joey Porter to the Cardinals.


--Josh Katzowitz

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .




Posted on: July 6, 2010 5:37 pm
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