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Tag:Kamerion Wimbley
Posted on: March 1, 2012 3:13 pm
Edited on: March 1, 2012 3:17 pm
 

Raiders might make Wimbley cap casualty

Oakland wants Wimbley to take a paycut, but he's already said he's not interested in doing so. (US Presswire)
By Josh Katzowitz

As general manager Reggie McKenzie continues to make the Raiders a less-expensive (and possibly less-talented) club -- already, Oakland has purged cornerback Stanford Routt – it sounds like there’s a big-time conflict coming between the club and linebacker Kamerion Wimbley.

According to NFL.com’s Jason La Canfora, the team will cut Wimbley if the two sides can’t renegotiate his deal.

While the Raiders try to get under the salary cap, at this point, they’ll have to pay Wimbley $11 million for next year, including $6.5 million guaranteed (in August, he signed a $48 million deal).

Wimbley has been a valuable member of the Browns and Raiders defense since Cleveland selected him in the first round of the 2006 draft, averaging 61.5 tackles and seven sacks per season.

As the Raiders blog points out, though, Wimbley has the leverage, writing, “This is classic contract standoff. Wimbley has Raiders by the throat. They both want him and don't want his contract. Team using media.”

But if the Raiders do decide to let go of Wimbley, who said he’s not interested in taking a paycut, so they don’t have to pay him, there likely won't be a shortage of teams who are willing to compensate him for playing.

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Posted on: November 15, 2011 4:47 pm
Edited on: November 15, 2011 5:21 pm
 

Eye on Football NFL Awards: Week 10

Posted by Will Brinson



Every week, our NFL experts will hand out the Eye on Football hardware to the best of the best from the NFL week that was.

Week 10 NFL Awards
Expert Offense Defense STeams Coach
Freeman   Fitz  Carter  Hester McCarthy
Judge   Fitz  Carter  Hester   Fox
Prisco  Romo  Carter  Hester  Whiz
Brinson  Romo  Carter Hauschka   Fox
Katzowitz  Romo Wimbley Hauschka   Fox
Wilson  Romo  Carter Hauschka Carroll
Another NFL week's in the books, and that means it's time to hand out the hardware.

Our Eye on Offense Award goes to Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo, whose matchup against Larry Fitzgerald for the trophy was much closer than his beatdown of the Buffalo Bills.

Andre Carter was the near-unanimous selection for our Eye on Defense Award. That's what happens when you produce the best pass rush New England's seen since the Bush administration.

Steven Hauschka -- a fellow Wolfpacker! -- stole Devin Hester's award away from Devin Hester thanks to five field goals that propelled the Seahawks to a (somewhat?) shocking win over the Ravens, and is our Eye on Special Teams recipient.

And John Fox, who continues to befuddle AFC West opponents by properly utilizing Tim Tebow, ran away with our Eye on Coaching Award for Week 10.

Leave your votes in the comments below or scream angrily at us on Twitter @EyeOnNFL.

Eye on Offense Award
Mike Freeman Clark Judge
Larry Fitzgerald Larry Fitzgerald, WR, Cardinals
On a crap team, with a crap quarterback, in a crap game, on a crappy throw, he makes one of the top catches of the week. Then again, week in and week out, that's what Fitzgerald does. He sometimes gets lost amid the talk of the best receivers in the NFL but he was the biggest reason the Cardinals beat Philly and I'd take Fitzgerald over any other WR.
Larry FitzgeraldLarry Fitzgerald, WR, Cardinals
He has 146 yards in catches, two touchdowns and sets up the winning score with a diving reception near the goal line ... and all from John Skelton. The Cards weren't supposed to win on the road. They weren't supposed to win with Skelton. And they certainly weren't supposed to beat the Eagles. They did, and Fitzgerald is why.
Pete Prisco Will Brinson
Tony Romo Tony Romo, QB, Cowboys
Romo completed 23-of-26 passes setting a Cowboys record for completion percentage, and threw three touchdowns in the Cowboys blowout of the Bills. Romo was poised in the pocket all day and never seemed to get unsettled.
Tony RomoTony Romo, QB, Cowboys
Romo had arguably the best game of his career against the Bills, throwing just three incompletions with three teeters, and the only reason his production wasn't better is that Dallas blew Buffalo out. Prediction: we'll be calling Romo a darkhorse MVP candidate by Week 14.
Josh Katzowitz Ryan Wilson
Tony RomoTony Romo, QB, Cowboys
He started the game 11/11 and finished by completing 88.5 percent of his passes (23/26) and throwing for 270 yards and three TDs. Forget about the loss of Miles Austin. With Dez Bryant beginning to show his talent and with the emergence of Laurent Robinson, Romo, at times, shows why he could be a top-five quarterback. That’s what he accomplished in destroying the Bills. 
Tony Romo Tony Romo, QB, Cowboys
According to Football Outsiders, Romo is a top-5 NFL quarterback. You wouldn't know it after watching him against the Jets and the Lions but you certainly would after his performance versus the Bills Sunday. He threw just three incompletions all day (that's three fewer than Tim Tebow ... while attempting 18 more passes) and had three TDs.
Eye on Defense Award
Freeman Judge
Andre CarterAndre Carter, DE, Patriots
The easiest choice to make for these awards. I watched Carter against a moderately talented offenisve line and he destroyed it with 4 1/2 sacks. I didn't think Carter had it in him. I didn't think the New England defense was capable of anything remotely like that. 
Andre Carter Andre Carter, DE, Patriots
The biggest problem with the league's last-ranked defense, people tell me, is that the Patriots can't rush the quarterback. Well, this just in: They just did, with Carter producing a career-high 4 1/2 sacks by himself. Rex Ryan wasn't outcoached. His players were outplayed, with Carter simply too much for the Jets' offensive line.
Prisco Brinson
Andre CarterJared Allen, DE, Vikings
Carter had 4 1/2 sacks against the Jets and could not be blocked. For a team that lacked a pass rusher for much of the season, they may have found one.
Andre CarterAndre Carter, DE, Patriots
The Patriots dynasty was dead (again). Until Andre Carter did to the Jets on offense what Tom Brady did to them on defense, exploding for 4 1/2 sacks and generating the first pass rush we've seen in New England in a while. If he keeps his motor running like this, watch out.
Katzowitz Wilson
Kamerion Wimbley Kamerion Wimbley, OLB, Raiders
On the day when Carson Palmer was celebrated for leading the Raiders to their first win under his stewardship, Oakland’s outside linebacker accumulated four sacks, three additional hits and seven pressures on Rivers. Not bad for a guy who had just two sacks on the season coming before.
Andre Carter Andre Carter, DE, Patriots
The Patriots' defense has alternated between punching bag and laughing stock all season. Against the Jets they were neither, harassing Mark Sanchez into mistakes all evening. Carter had 4.5 sacks, a personal and team best. 

Eye on Special Teams Award
Freeman Judge
Devin HesterDevin Hester, WR/KR, Bears
Thanks to Hester producing yet another return touchdown (this time an 82-yard run to the house), he was the second easiest choice this week. How about this? Stop kicking to him. STOP KICKING TO HIM. And put him in the Hall of Fame.
Devin Hester Devin Hester, WR/KR, Bears
One of these days someone will figure out that no one in NFL history has more punt returns for touchdowns than this guy, so maybe it's not a good idea to kick to him. Hester sets up one score with a 29-yard return, then produces a touchdown on an 82-yard runback. The numbers don't lie, people. This guy is the best there ever was.
Prisco Brinson
Devin HesterDevin Hester, WR/KR, Bears
He had a punt return for a touchdown, his 18th return for a score in his career. Why do people kick to him?

 

Steven HauschkaSteven  Hauschka, K, Seahawks
Doesn't Hauschka kind of look like he should be named "Steve" instead? Whatever, the N.C. State product kicked like his name was Morten on Sunday, banging home five field goals and generating the majority of the scoring for the Seahwaks in an upset only one person saw coming.
Katzowitz Wilson
Steven Hauschka Steven Hauschka, K, Seahawks
In Seattle’s upset of the Ravens, Hauschka matched the franchise record by kicking five field goals (22, 38, 39, 35 and 30 yards). They weren’t long attempts, and they weren’t game-winners. But without his capability, Seattle doesn’t provide the week’s most surprising result.
Steven Hauschka Steven Hauschka, K, Seahawks
The former Raven was an integral part of the Seahawks' "death by 1,000 field goals" gameplan. He was 5 for 5 and accounted for all but seven of Seattle's points in their win over Baltimore, the league's most inconsistent team.
Eye on Coaching Award
Freeman Judge
Mike McCarthyMike McCarthy, HC, Packers
Monday night against Minnesota was the perfect time for a letdown game and the Packers respond by wrecking the Vikings. I know. Division rival. But it isn't easy playing those type of games when their lead in the division is so large and the opponent is no good.

John Fox John Fox, HC, Broncos
Not only did he beat Kansas City in Kansas City, he won by completing two passes all afternoon. Of course, it always helps when you run for 244 yards, but Fox's Broncos did it with their top two backs missing most of the afternoon. Fox is smart to tailor is offense to his quarterback's talents, and that tinkering has the Broncos a game out of first in the AFC West.
Prisco Brinson
Ken WhisenhuntKen Whisenhunt, HC, Cardinals
Playing with backup quarterback John Skelton on the road against a supposed good team in the Eagles, Whisenhunt got his team to pull off an upset as a 14-point underdog. That's impressive.
John FoxJohn Fox, HC, Broncos
Fox is a run-first/play-defense type of guy, so you have to think he rather enjoyed beating the Chiefs when his offense only completed two passes all day. Mock the read-option at your own risk: what Fox and his staff are doing with Tim Tebow is the very definition of great coaching.
Katzowitz Wilson
John Fox John Fox, HC, Broncos
You can call the offense he’s helped install a college-style offense. You can call it outrageous to current NFL sensibilities. But you also have to call it a winning formula so far. Fox isn’t known for his offensive capabilities – he came up on the defensive side of the ball – but with offensive coordinator Mike McCoy, this read-option style of play has Denver at 3-1 when Tim Tebow starts at quarterback.
Pete Carroll Pete Carroll, HC, Seahawks
Jim Harbaugh deserves some credit too, because Carroll hoped the Ravens would get away from Ray Rice and the run game and that's exactly what happened. It's not every day you're out-schemed by Carroll. We can only hope that during this post-game handshake Caroll reminded John to say hello to his brother Jim for him.

Posted on: November 11, 2011 12:03 am
Edited on: November 13, 2011 11:17 am
 

Old Carson shows up, looks great in Raiders win

Palmer was the best quarterback on the field Thursday night. (Getty Images)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

It's been 23 days since Carson Palmer hoisted himself off his couch to resume his football career. After nine months off, the first six quarters of Palmer's comeback were highlighted by indecisiveness, incompletions, sacks and interceptions (six of them to be exact). And then against the Chargers, it clicked.

Palmer missed on his first two throws then proceeded to connect on 13 consecutive passes, including two touchdowns to rookie Denarius Moore and completions of 41, 46, 33 and 55 yards. It was as if Palmer hopped in a time machine, set course for 2005, and that guy suited up for the Raiders Thursday night against the Chargers in a game Oakland would win 24-17.

Maybe Hue Jackson really does know what he's doing.

San Diego, meanwhile, continues to flounder, although their fourth straight loss had nothing to do with quarterback Philip Rivers. One of the league's best passers, Rivers admits that he hasn't played well this season. The 14 interceptions through eight weeks are a testament to that.

Against the Raiders, it was injuries along the offensive line that doomed San Diego's chances. Left tackle Marcus McNeill went down midway through the first quarter, which prompted NFL Network color analyst Mike Mayock to predict a long evening for McNeill's replacement, Brandyn Dombrowski --and by extension, Rivers.

"All day long Dombrowski is going to have trouble if he doesn't get some help. And at halftime they gotta get that kid some help," Mayock said.

Raiders linebacker Kamerion Wimbley had three first-half sacks, all coming against Dombrowski who did little to slow him up.

Despite all that, Rivers had the Chargers in position to tie the game late. Trailing 24-17 with just over three minutes to go and the ball on the Raiders' 42-yard line, Rivers threw a ball into the end zone looking for Vincent Jackson. Except Jackson appeared to lose the ball in the air. Safety Matt Giordano (who was replacing the injured Michael Huff) had no such trouble and came up with the interception.

Two plays later, the Chargers had a chance to get the ball back. Facing third and 11, Carson From the Past calmly stood tall in the pocket, before stepping up and finding tight end Kevin Boss over the middle … for a 24-yard gain.

San Diego got the ball back for one more series, with 1:04 on the clock. Rivers drove them to midfield and then, as if scripted, Wimbley sacked him on the penultimate play and Tommy Kelly sealed the Chargers' fate with another sack a snap later.

The six sacks are a season high for Oakland, who now sit atop the AFC West at 5-4. The Chargers, losers of four straight, fall to 4-5.

It's not an exaggeration to say that Palmer put on a clinic. And while his story of redemption makes for a swell After School Special about never giving up, the best offensive player for the Raiders Thursday was running back Michael Bush.

Oakland was without Darren McFadden for the second straight game and all Bush did was rush for 157 yards and haul in another 85 yards receiving. He softened up the Chargers' defense, made the Raiders' play-action passing game effective, and perhaps most important, kept Rivers off the field. (By the way, Bush's 242 yards from scrimmage is a new team record, surpassing Bo Jackson's mark of 235, set in 1987 against the Seahawks.)

After the game, Bush sounded thankful for the opportunity.

"You know, today, I think a lot of people doubted me. Darren's hurt -- he is a big part of our offense, and I miss him just like everybody else misses him -- but today the o-line did a great job, Carson did a great job, and coach called some great plays and we got a win," Bush said.

When NFL Network's Alex Flanagan asked Bush what he proved to his doubters, he said, "That's what they get. I laugh at them. I work hard just like every back in the league and I come out here and try to have fun."

We're only midway through the season but this game is a vindication of sorts for Jackson, who staked his reputation -- and the Raiders' future -- on Palmer. It took three games but Palmer looks legit and Jackson looks like a genius. How long it lasts remains to be seen, but for now Jackson has silenced his critics.

A month ago Palmer, in his words, was "hitting up Norv (Turner) for tickets to a game -- I was going to take my son." Now he's the quarteraback of the first-place Raiders.


Cris, Phil, and Warren go into overtime to complete their set of predictions for Week Ten. Watch a web-exclusive from SHOWTIME's Inside the NFL.

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Posted on: August 2, 2011 2:33 pm
 

Zach Miller about to be 'back with the Raiders'?

Posted by Will Brinson

The Raiders made a splash by giving linebacker Kamerion Wimbley a five-year, $48 million deal on Monday, though when we wrote about the deal, we expressed some concern that it could end up costing the team the services of tight end Zach Miller, especially after their franchise-tag flip-flop.

Miller's been visiting the Seahawks (and therefore cranking up a little west-coast drama, as they currently employ ex-Raiders coach Tom Cable) but, according to Raiders radio guy Greg Papa, via the San Francisco Chronicle, the black-and-silver is about to bring their tight end back.

"Zach Miller will be back with the Raiders," Papa said, per Vittorio Tafur. "Al Davis didn't just give Kamerion Wimbley $29 million to lose Zach Miller to Tom Cable."

Papa also said that he expects an announcement to come on Tuesday.

Miller's easily the top free-agent tight end remaining on the open market, and landing him would be a coup for either Oakland or Seattle, both of whom could use an extra safety blanket for their shaky quarterbacks on the roster.

Raiders coach Hue Jackson, per our Raiders Rapid Reporter Eric Gilmore, noted as much on the radio Monday night.

"Zach was a Raider last year, we want him to be a Raider now," Jackson said. "That thing is going to come to a head here soon. It has to. I feel good about where we are and, hopefully, he'll get back to us, we'll get back to him, and we'll try to get something resolved."

Based on Papa's claim, that resolution could come sooner than Jackson might have expected.

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Posted on: August 1, 2011 8:14 pm
 

Kamerion Wimbley lands $48M deal from Raiders

Posted by Will Brinson

Kamerion Wimbley was franchise-tagged by the Raiders before the lockout. But, it was only after the Raiders decided to franchise tag tight end Zach Miller, rescinded it, and then hit up Wimbley.

Given that Wimbley cost more than $10 million for just 2011 under that tag, this seemed like a weird move. Whatever, it won't matter because the Raiders have reportedly signed Wimbley to a five-year deal worth $48 million that also contains $29 million in guaranteed money, according to Jason LaCanfora of the NFL Network.

Yes, that's a chunk of change, but the Raiders were bumped up on the salary cap and needed to loosen up some money -- restructuring Wimbley's deal does just that.

Wimbley will turn 28 in October, and he posted nine sacks last year, giving him 35 on his career. So, the deal's not bananas crazy or anything (unless you want to compare it to Nnamdi Asomugha, a former Raider, and what he got on the open market anyway!).

My beef with this whole shebang stems more with the fact that a) there's more value to the money spent on someone like Miller and his relative franchise-tag number, b) they could have signed Wimbley to this deal before the lockout and also tagged Miller, c) they probably could have done so without giving Wimbley as much leverage by telling him he's worth north of $10 million a year, and d) the whole Wimbley saga got started because someone in the Raiders' front office forgot how to do math.

Therefore, it seems only fair to criticize the deal a bit.

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Posted on: March 17, 2011 2:06 pm
Edited on: March 20, 2011 3:03 pm
 

Offseason Checkup: Oakland Raiders

Posted by Will Brinson



Eye on Football's playing doctor for every NFL team with our Offseason Check-ups. Also, check out our checkup podcast:


For every single team in NFL history, sweeping the division has resulted in a playoff spot. As it should -- that’s six wins and an incredible headstart on the postseason race.

Then the 2010 Raiders came along.

They won all six of their division games and yet still somehow managed to go 2-8 in the remaining contests on their schedule. That resulted in Tom Cable’s firing and a lot of angry confusion in the Bay Area.

A much worse trait’s percolating around the Black Hole though: cautious optimism. Since Oakland’s fall from grace following their 2002 Super Bowl loss to the Bucs, Oakland hasn’t just been a lost cause. They’ve been the poster child for bad management.

2010 didn’t change that, but Raiders fans will probably try and tell you otherwise. Hue Jackson moving from offensive coordinator to head coach will give Jason Campbell some much-needed stability, and it should bode well for both the continued improvement of Darren McFadden and Oakland’s stockpile of burners at the wide receiver position.

But personnel losses on the other side of the ball -- Nnamdi Asomugha, mainly -- and a focus on scoring points might not exactly guarantee any more success in 2011.


Delusion, Stopping the Run

Part of the Raiders second-ranked passing defense was Asomugha’s ability to shut down half of the field. But part of it was also their inability to stop opposing offenses from piling up yardage on the ground; running backs averaged 133.6 yards per game (and 4.5 yards per carry) against Oakland.

That was good for 29th in the NFL and it’s pretty clear that “losing games” and “not stopping the run” go hand-in-hand. Chris Johnson (142 yards), Arian Foster (131), Frank Gore (149), Ricky Williams (95), Rashard Jennings (109) and even Dominic Rhodes (98) all put up pretty big numbers when Oakland lost.

Oddly, not once in a Raiders’ win did an opposing back tote the ball more than 20 times. Many times -- though not always -- that was because Oakland jumped out to big leads early.

And it’s possible that Jackson can continue that trend into 2011, but improved defense against the rush will avoid the need to make big and sometimes luck-driven leads a requirement.


1. Secondary
Stanford Routt’s the new No. 1 in Oaktown with Asomugha now departing to, um, somewhere. (We don’t know where yet, but he’s probably not coming back to Oakland.) Routt and Chris Johnson can work well together, but there’s a pretty good chance that losing Nnamdi will expose other areas in the secondary as teams work the entire field against Oakland. It’ll also stretch their safeties even thinner than before, something that could become a problem if Michael Huff and Tyvon Branch can’t step up their game.

2. Front Office Contract Guy
No, but seriously -- the fact that Asomugha and Kamerion Wimbley somehow BOTH managed to end up with funky as all get-out finales to their contracts is pretty indicative that something ain’t stirring the Kool-Aid in the front office when it comes to the guy who draws up the deals. Either that or Oakland really wanted to dump Nnamdi this offseason. Which makes less sense than accidentally messing up a pair of big-time contracts.

3. Outside linebacker
Branch and Huff were the leading tacklers for Oakland in 2010, which is good, because tackles are nice. It’s bad because it means that teams were pretty easily getting to the furthest layer of the Raiders’ defense. Letting people break big plays (the Raiders allowed 17 rushes over 20 yards, third-worst in the league, and 51 passes over 20 yards, 11th worst) was a nasty little problem for Oakland last year. And even with "franchise" player Wimbley sitting on the outside, Oakland needs some more run stuffers.


There'll be optimism in the Raiders' fanbase, because there always is. But there's not that much of a reason for it. They're losing one of the top two cornerbacks in the NFL, there's no guarantee that McFadden can continue his much-delayed breakout, there's a 100-percent certainty that Richard Seymour is a year older, and they're still starting Jason Campbell.

Oh yes, and they're still the Raiders too.

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Posted on: February 24, 2011 2:19 pm
Edited on: February 24, 2011 2:23 pm
 

Raiders flip flop, hit Wimbley with franchise tag

Posted by Will Brinson

Things were going a little TOO well for the Oakland Raiders, weren't they? Well, there's a familiar air of normal oddity floating out of the Bay Thursday, as it appears the Raiders have reversed course on their decision to franchise tight end Zach Miller and are applying the tag to linebacker Kamerion Wimbley

That's because the Raiders apparently made a little boo-boo with Wimbley's contract -- as we previously mentioned, the final buy-back year of his contract was in jeopardy because of some mathematical folly.

Now Adam Caplan of FOX Sports reports that the Raiders have decided to franchise Wimbley, which means that instead of buying back the final year of his rookie contract at $3.5 million, the Raiders will pay him more than $10 million for the 2011 season.

Wimbley's a very good player, but is he worthy of being paid an average of the top-five salaries at his position? Um, no. And that could mean that the Raiders are interested in pursuing a long-term deal with him -- though they've now done a pretty poor job of establishing a baseline for negotiations.

And there's the issue of what to do with Miller if they want to keep both players through at least 2011. They can either seek to sign him to a long-term deal at this point, or use the same RFA tag the Panthers are reportedly popping on DeAngelo Williams and Charles Johnson to at least squat on his rights for the time being.

Either way, everyone can sleep normally knowing that things are getting dysfunctional with Oakland once again.

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Posted on: February 23, 2011 12:01 am
 

Report: Wimbley might become UFA after all

Posted by Will Brinson

Kamerion Wimbley was going to be a free agent, after he hit playing-time incentives in 2010. But the Raiders decided to utilize a buy-back clause in his rookie contract, paying the linebacker $3.5 million dollars to keep him in 2011.

According to Adam Caplan of FOX Sports, though, things could get choppy, because Wimbley's $3.5 million buy-back would actually violate the "30-percent rule," which states that player's contract can't increase from the previous year by more than 30 percent.

In this case, Wimbley's salary for 2010 was $2.115 million. That means his max base salary for 2011 would be, based on the aforementioned percentage rule, $2.75 million.

Purchasing his contract for $3.5 million, then, would theoretically violate that rule and make Wimbley a free agent on March 4, which is what he thought would happen once the final year voided the first time around.

If this happens -- and, bear in mind, it's still just a report -- it would be the second time this offseason that a Raiders player had the final year of their contract lost for a bizarre reason. You may recall that Nnamdi Asomugha's contract voided because of some asinine playing incentives. The Raiders played it off as if they meant to allow the contract to void -- if the same thing happens to Wimbley's deal, that might be a tougher claim to make.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com